Behavioral Case Study assignment Prefer first see all the instruction then reply please. All information attach in files please follow case study example and rubric

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Behavioral Case Study assignment

Prefer first see all the instruction then reply please. All information attach in files

please follow case study example and rubric

Behavioral Case Study assignment Prefer first see all the instruction then reply please. All information attach in files please follow case study example and rubric
CDEC 1319 case study – page 3 Department of Education Child Development Program 3214 Austin Street, Houston, TX 77004 713-718-6303 phone 713-718-6235 fax CDEC 1319 Child Guidance Behavioral Case Study Required Assignment – This assignment (child guidance case study) is required for completion of this course. If this assignment is not completed with 70% of possible points, you will not receive a passing grade in this class. You will observe and write about the behavior of one child. 3 – 8 years old. You will observe this child on three different days. This assignment must be typed. The case study assignment for this class is meant to help the student practice accurately observing children’s behavior, stating the goal for behavior changes and planning an implementation procedure to change the behavior. The case study must be written and presented to college standards for neatness, grammar and writing. The title page should include the student’s name, course number and instructor’s name. The case study development must follow the following outline: The first half of the case study will include: 1. Introduction of the Child Mention the child’s name (may be fictitious name). Give a short physical description of the child. Include the child’s age in this section. Give a short “history” of the child, including family make-up, family environments or other factual information you consider important about the child. Do not give any opinions or suppositions in your paragraph. 2. State the Behavior Give a short description of the problem behavior. For example: The child regularly hits (bites, wastes materials, takes toys, wets his pants, etc.) It should be factual; do not give any opinions or suppositions. One or two sentences is enough. 3. Observe the Behavior Before you attempt to deal with the problem behavior gather as much factual information about the behavior as possible. Answer these questions in bullet format. When does the inappropriate behavior occur most often? What happens to the child just before the inappropriate behavior occurs? With whom does the inappropriate behavior occur? What does the child do when she/he act inappropriately? What happened after the child acts inappropriately? 4. Explore the Consequences What can happen if a problem behavior is not altered? Use your knowledge, from reading the textbook, to write two or three sentences. 5. Consider the Alternatives Could outside influences be fueling this behavior? Problem behavior does not always stem from the child. Look at the environment, the other children and the adults in the child’s life. What else could be a factor in the observed behavior? Write a paragraph about these influences. 6. State the Goal The goal for the child whose behavior you want to change is stated in this section. For some children, it would be helpful to eliminate the behavior, for some to lower the frequency, or to change the expectations of the child, caregiver or parent. Your goal should be written in objective format such as: Donny will eliminate his nail biting within thirty days. The second half of the case study will present a step by step method for changing the specific behavior. 7. Definition Give a concise definition of the behavior to be changed. Find the definition in your textbook or in a dictionary. 8. Baseline Take a baseline of the frequency of behavior with which to compare later changes. Do this over at least a three-day period. These will be hand-written anecdotal observation notes. If you are submitting these three anecdotal observations as separate documents, then write, “See attachments.” In this section of your study. 9. Program Design a program for changing the behavior. It could be several consecutive steps or simultaneous procedures. For example, you might ignore the behavior, offer a reward for opposite behavior, institute a brief “time out”, or encourage the child to help in determining the consequences. Put this in a numbered step-by-step format. 10. Maintenance Once a goal is reached, it is important to maintain it. Give at least two suggestions to help keep the appropriate behavior and avoid a setback. Put this in bullets (sentence format) or a paragraph. 11. Graph Behavior Keep a graph of the daily behavior. Often the behavior is heightened at first and then diminishes. You may use a bar graph, or a line graph. This can be hand-drawn. There should be three entries on your graph to coincide with the baseline data that you collected. Revision – 10/2021
Behavioral Case Study assignment Prefer first see all the instruction then reply please. All information attach in files please follow case study example and rubric
CDEC 1319 case study – page 3 Department of Education Child Development Program 3214 Austin Street, Houston, TX 77004 713-718-6303 phone 713-718-6235 fax CDEC 1319 Child Guidance Behavioral Case Study Alternate Assignment Required Component – This assignment (child guidance case study) is required for completion of this course. If this assignment is not completed with 70% of possible points, you will not receive a passing grade in this class. For this alternate assignment, you will view video clips from a 1970s era TV sitcom, Full House. Choose one of the characters and identify one problem behavior that the character repeats over the course of three different days. You can tell that the days change, because the character changes costumes. Write your case study just as if you were observing a live child over a three-day period. Here are some video clips to view; you will need internet access to be able to open the links: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1CNkqyjxClQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6x_ETMypLjw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzqcBhhE-Q4 Another choice is to view both of these video clips about Ava. Choose one of Ava’s problem behaviors to document. You will not see Ava misbehave on three different days, so document what you see at three points during the video clips. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KJo7RE3qSvQ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzO-D1VP2Eo The case study assignment for this class is meant to help the student practice accurately observing children’s behavior, stating the goal for behavior changes and planning an implementation procedure to change the behavior. The case study must be written and presented to college standards for neatness, grammar and writing. The title page should include the student’s name, course number and instructor’s name. The case study development must follow the following outline: The first half of the case study will include: 1. Introduction of the Child Mention the child’s name (may be fictitious name). Give a short physical description of the child. Give a short “history” of the child, including family make-up, family environments or other factual information you consider important about the child. Do not give any opinions or suppositions in your paragraph. 2. State the Behavior Give a short description of the problem behavior. For example: The child regularly hits (bites, wastes materials, takes toys, wets his pants, etc.) It should be factual; do not give any opinions or suppositions. One or two sentences is enough. 3. Observe the Behavior Before you attempt to deal with the problem behavior gather as much factual information about the behavior as possible. Answer these questions in either paragraph or bullet format. When does the inappropriate behavior occur most often? What happens to the child just before the inappropriate behavior occurs? With whom does the inappropriate behavior occur? What does the child do when she/he act inappropriately? What happened after the child acts inappropriately? 4. Explore the Consequences What can happen if a problem behavior is not altered? Use your knowledge, from reading the textbook, to write two or three sentences. 5. Consider the Alternatives Could outside influences be fueling this behavior? Problem behavior does not always stem from the child. Look at the environment, the other children and the adults in the child’s life. What else could be a factor in the observed behavior? Write a paragraph about these influences. 6. State the Goal The goal for the child whose behavior you want to change is stated in this section. For some children, it would be helpful to eliminate the behavior, for some to lower the frequency, or to change the expectations of the child, caregiver or parent. Your goal should be written in objective format such as: Donny will eliminate his nail biting within thirty days. The second half of the case study will present a step by step method for changing the specific behavior. 7. Definition Give a concise definition of the behavior to be changed. Find the definition in your textbook or in a dictionary. 8. Baseline Take a baseline of the frequency of behavior with which to compare later changes. Do this over at least a three-day period. These will be hand-written anecdotal observation notes. 9. Program Design a program for changing the behavior. It could be several consecutive steps or simultaneous procedures. For example, you might ignore the behavior, offer a reward for opposite behavior, institute a brief “time out”, or encourage the child to help in determining the consequences. Put this in a numbered step-by-step format, or in a paragraph. 10. Maintenance Once a goal is reached, it is important to maintain it. Give at least two suggestions to help keep the appropriate behavior and avoid a setback. Put this in bullets (sentence format) or a paragraph. 11. Graph Behavior Keep a graph of the daily behavior. Often the behavior is heightened at first and then diminishes. You may use a bar graph, or a line graph. This can be hand-drawn. There should be at least three entries on your graph to coincide with the baseline data that you collected. Revision – 3/20
Behavioral Case Study assignment Prefer first see all the instruction then reply please. All information attach in files please follow case study example and rubric
Anecdotal Observation Record for Baseline Your Name:       Date:       Start Time:       Specific Location:       Child’s Name:       Child’s Age:       Observe an individual child between the ages of 3-8. Observe for enough time to record one event, on one day. Record only the facts of what you see in the column on the left. In the column on the right, record your opinions about what you observed. Type or handwrite using this form. Observation Facts for 1 Event 3 or More Comments or Opinions            
Behavioral Case Study assignment Prefer first see all the instruction then reply please. All information attach in files please follow case study example and rubric
Case Study Rubric NAEYC Standard 3 CDEC 1319 Assignment Instructions Rubric Requirements Points Possible Points Earned 1. Introduction of the Child Mention the child’s name (may be fictitious name). Give a short physical description of the child, including the child’s age. Give a short “history” of the child, including family make-up, family environments or other factual information you consider important about the child. Do not give any opinions or suppositions in your paragraph. Description of the child 10 Information about the family 10 2. State the Behavior Give a short description of the one problem behavior you have identified. For example: The child regularly hits (bites, wastes materials, takes toys, wets his pants, etc.) It should be factual; do not give any opinions or suppositions. 2 or 3 sentences is enough. Description matched the observed inappropriate behavior (see 3.) 10 Description of the problem behavior is in one to three sentences 10 3. Observe the Behavior Before you attempt to deal with the problem behavior gather as much factual information about the behavior as possible. Answer these questions in bullet format: When does the inappropriate behavior occur most often? What happens to the child just before the inappropriate behavior occurs? With whom does the inappropriate behavior occur? What does the child do when she/he act inappropriately? What happened after the child acts inappropriately? When? What happened before? With whom? Description of inappropriate behavior What happened afterwards? 4. Explore the Consequences What can happen if a problem behavior is not altered? Use your knowledge, from reading the textbook, to write two or three sentences. Discussion matched the observed inappropriate behavior 10 Discussion of the possible consequences is in two or three sentences 10 5. Consider the Alternatives Could outside influences be fueling this behavior? Problem behavior does not always stem from the child. Look at the environment, the other children and the adults in the child’s life. What else could be a factor in the observed behavior? Write a paragraph about these influences. Describes 2-3 factors influencing this behavior in a paragraph 10 6. State the Goal The goal for the child whose behavior you want to change is stated in this section. For some children, it would be helpful to eliminate the behavior, and for other children it would be helpful to lower the frequency. Your goal should be written in objective format such as: Donny will eliminate his nail biting within thirty days Goal statement is written in an observable and measurable objective format 15 7. Definition Give a concise definition of the behavior to be changed (1-2 sentences). Find the definition in your textbook or in a dictionary. Definition of the behavior was concise and accurate 10 8. Baseline Take a baseline of the frequency of behavior with which to compare later changes. Do this over at least a three-day period. These can be hand-written notes. Three observation assessments were completed during a three-day period (anecdotal records) 15 9. Program Design a program for changing the behavior. It could be several consecutive steps or simultaneous procedures. For example, you might ignore the behavior, offer a reward for opposite behavior, institute a brief “time out”, or encourage the child to help in determining the consequences. Put this in a numbered step-by-step format. Program matched the observed inappropriate behavior, and was in a step-by-step format 15 10. Maintenance Once a goal is reached, it is important to maintain it. Give at least two suggestions to help keep the appropriate behavior and avoid a setback. Put this in bullets (sentence format) or a paragraph. Two maintenance suggestions correlated with the program that was designed for the child in bullet or paragraph format 15 11. Graph Behavior Keep a graph of the daily behavior. Often the behavior is heightened at first and then diminishes. You may use a bar graph, or a line graph. This can be hand-drawn. There should be 3 entries on your graph to coincide with the baseline data that you collected. Bar or line graph coincides with the baseline data collected with at least 3 entries 15 Format Only facts were used in the first three sections. The outline was followed and the headings were used. Spelling and grammar errors were minimal. Only facts, no opinions, in first 3 sections Followed format and used headings No spelling or grammar errors 10 Student’s Name: Total Points Earned: Grade: 3
Behavioral Case Study assignment Prefer first see all the instruction then reply please. All information attach in files please follow case study example and rubric
Name Date 1. Introduction of the Child Marcus is an eight-year-old Asian-American boy. He is big for his age and very sporty. He plays on a local Little League baseball team. Both of his parents are doctors. His father has a daughter from a previous marriage who lives with their family. She is fifteen. Marcus’ father has recently retired and is able to spend more time with his family. 2. State the Behavior Marcus regularly refuses to cleanup food and toys when his mother asks him. 3. Observe the Behavior The inappropriate behavior occurs most often when Marcus has a playdate over. Just before the inappropriate behavior occurs, Marcus is told that playtime is over and that it is time to clean-up or stop the game. The inappropriate behavior occurs with his mother. When the inappropriate behavior occurs, Marcus first begs his mother to keep playing, followed by a statement like, “No! I’m not cleaning up!” He then shows upset body language, such as sinking onto the couch with his arms folded. After Marcus acts inappropriately, his father most often comes into the playroom and tells him to do what his mother says. 4. Explore the Consequences If the problem is not altered, Marcus will have a difficult time accepting limits and developing self-direction in life. If Marcus’ behavior remains overly influenced by the presence of his peers, he will not develop a positive sense of self. 5. Consider the Alternatives Marcus is an early school-ager. According to Erickson (1963), the central emotional crisis is industry versus inferiority. Seeing that the behavior occurs in front of playdates, Marcus could perceive following his mother’s rule of cleaning up as something inferior. On two of my observations, he asked, “how come you cleanup after daddy and not me?” This indicates he does not see a good role model in his father’s habits and is quick to question his mother’s rule. Marcus’ older sister is also messy. His reaction is to be upset about fairness, which is typical of early school-agers (Miller, p.76). Furthermore, Marcus could be too dependent on playdates for entertainment. On weekends when he is not playing baseball, his parents could also spend more one-on-one time with him through other activities. Marcus’ mother also told me recently that the school informed her that Marcus had befriended a troublemaker, who she had invited over before. The school separated the two children and he is no longer invited on playdates. Marcus could be upset about this. 6. State the Goal The goal is to eliminate this behavior by the end of the school year. Marcus will begin to learn that cleaning up is part of industriousness, not inferiority. 7. Definition The behavior to be eliminated is Marcus’ repeated refusal of his mother’s rule to cleanup, especially in front of playdates. This behavior has two parts (1) the initial verbal refusal and (2) his upset body language that can lead to tantrums. 8. Baseline Please see the three attached observation forms. 9. Program The central point of my program is about modeling positive behavior. It is also aimed at preventing the inappropriate behavior in the first place. Right before cleanup time, let Marcus know that he has ten more minutes. Place a clock in the playroom. This will help prepare him before the moment to cleanup and say goodbye to his playmate arrives. At cleanup time, instead of asking repeatedly to cleanup, design a transitional song for Marcus (and his friend, if present) to sing or play on a music media application. Say “it’s time for cleanup!” and play the song. Marcus should be familiar with this from school. Bringing it into the home creates a similar structure. Indicate that Marcus (and his playdate, if present) can choose their own songs to cleanup to. Make it another game—they are playing DJ! We can dance as we cleanup! It can function like a short music lesson. For the first few times this is implemented, ask Marcus’ father and sister to come help with cleanup time, especially when Marcus is alone. When Marcus does not have a playdate, make a point to play with him one-on-one and clean up with him. If the playmate is present, make a point of asking him or her what they do to cleanup at home. Make sure both the playmate and Marcus help to cleanup. Since Marcus displays anxiety at cleaning up when his friends are also leaving, make a point of talking about a ‘next time.’ For instance, “Next time you come over, we can bake cookies. That’s a messy activity, but you’ve shown me that you will help cleanup.” Once Marcus begins to spontaneously cleanup when music is played, create a reward system. Since Marcus and his playdate followed the rule of cleaning up, design special future outings they can look forward to. When Marcus cleans up on his own, make sure to reinforce the behavior by emphasizing that such behavior will lead to more playdates. 10. Maintenance It is important that Marcus sees others cleaning up around him. His father should not just be the one who only punishes when his mother cannot stop the inappropriate behavior. Since he is now retired, he can also help Marcus more and show him that cleaning up is an important part of sharing responsibility. Once Marcus begins to cleanup spontaneously on his own, keep the music strategy in place for a few more months. If you notice that he forgets about the music, without your suggestion, and still cleans up, do not remind him. At this point, he has eliminated the inappropriate behavior. 11. Graph Behavior See below.

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