Discussion: Quantifying Qualitative Information in the Measure Phase of the DMAIC Process Model First, read Chapter 5 in The Essential Workplace Conflict Handbook and review your work with SMART goals

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Discussion: Quantifying Qualitative Information in the Measure Phase of the DMAIC Process Model

First, read Chapter 5 in The Essential Workplace Conflict Handbook and review your work with SMART goals.

Next, carefully read the MEASURE Supplementary Document and, using your actual organization’s conflict (or the Garden Depot case study), Measure the problem or problems you Defined in Module Two. Use the Organization A Example Flowchart to help you organize your thinking, and then put the information from your flowchart into a Measure gap-analysis table using the Measure Gap-Analysis Table Template. Upload this table to the discussion.

In your initial post, address the following:

  • What were some challenges you encountered in identifying the variables (ethical, moral, or legal) that were or are present between employees and the organization you evaluated?
  • How will you apply what you have learned about transforming qualitative information to quantitative data to identify and analyze gaps in your final project case study’s organizational conflict?

Discussion: Quantifying Qualitative Information in the Measure Phase of the DMAIC Process Model First, read Chapter 5 in The Essential Workplace Conflict Handbook and review your work with SMART goals
WCM 610 Measure Gap-Analysis Table Template Measure Gap-Analysis Table Organization A (Variables) Importance (Percent of inputs that are critical or very important) Skill Satisfaction (Percent of skill ratings at better than average) Gap in Points (Reframe as possible opportunity; *the higher the number, the more important satisfaction of the gap is) Interdepartmental Team Collaboration on Projects Interdepartmental Team Communication/Verbal Delivery of Information Effective Listening Among Individuals Addressing Difficult Conversations Written Communication/Email Interdepartmental Team Meetings/Live Presentations Interdepartmental Team Meetings/Virtual Presentations *Negative number indicates that the issue is unimportant and skill satisfaction is higher than the importance
Discussion: Quantifying Qualitative Information in the Measure Phase of the DMAIC Process Model First, read Chapter 5 in The Essential Workplace Conflict Handbook and review your work with SMART goals
WCM 610 MEASURE Supplementary Document Identifying and measuring the different variables in organizational conflict will be your task when you complete the Measure phase of your final project. Below is an example of how to measure t hese variables quantitatively when interviewing stakeholders for the organization. Review this document carefully in order to complete the Module T hree discussion on quantifying qualitative information in the Measure phase of the DMAIC process model . Recall the SMART g oals from Organization A that you worked with in the Define phase in Module Two. The Gap in Points column indic ates opportunities where SMART g oals can be narrowly specified. Think of a funnel, and of moving your DMAIC process from the widest to the narrowest part of the funnel. Here you seek to qua ntify soft communication skills as a piece of the Measure phase of the interdepartmental relationship among teams at Organization A. Problems are identified in the key areas in the chart, and the y are quant ified. One could then take each specific piece of the Measure table and create specific SMART g oals for each. Iteratively l ink the Measure phase back to the Define phase as you move back, as you would do in a real organizational conflict. In the Module T hree d iscussion, in order to gain a conceptual understanding, begin by creating a flowchart to show relationships between and among the various pieces to be measured , and then put your findings (variables) and results (quantita tive data) into your gap -anal ysis table . View the Organization A Example Flowchart to assist you with this. Notice how the flowchart includes a reflect and revise recommendation. DMAIC is a recursive process , rather than a linear process . Once you are fairly confident in the Define and Measure phase findings and results, move ahead to Analyze, bearing in mind that reflection, review, and revision of all earlier phases is critical. To see how to create a flowchart, view Microsoft PowerPoint: Create a Flow Chart . You may also find How to Make a Flowchart in PowerPoint helpful . (Note: T he Measure phase here involves conflicts in groups. In Module Six , you will learn about Dr. Bruce Tuckman’s Five Stages of Group Development . Tuckman’s theory uses a model to help you to deconstruct the stages of how separate individuals become a viable team.) Next, you will take your actual organization’s conflict or t he Garden Depot case study , and measure the problems you defined in Module T wo. Use the Organization A Example Flowchart to help you to organize your thinking, and then put the information from your flowchart into a Measure gap -analysis table using the Measure Gap -Analysis Table Template . (See the completed example below.) While DMAIC as a methodology used in many organizations typic ally involves statistics, some c onflict specialists find that a qualitative methodology produces key variables that can be used to define, measure, analyze, improve, and control the problems facing the organization. This involves the use of the in -depth interview process, asking open -ended “what” and “how” questions of employees, external stakeholders (e.g., customers), and leadership. The first column in the Measure gap -analysis table below shows variables. A variable is a piece of information that differs with each research participant (e.g., an interviewee ), and also differ s among research projects. Note that, in order to arrive at data that can be compared and analyzed, each participant ( interviewee) mu st be asked the same questions . The variable may also be thought of as the outcome of the analyst’s research questions. By examining the variables in the Measure gap -analysis table below, you should be able to pose the specific questions tha t would be likely to result in the variables provided. You must first conceptualize what you want to know. T hink of a funnel. Beginning with the broad question, “ What happens when your team works on a project? ” would lead to increasingly narrower questions , such as, “How well do interdepartmental team s collaborate on joint projects?” and, “W hat is your present level of satisfaction with the interdepartmental team collaboration, giving a pe rcentage rating from 1 to 100% ( with 100% being the highest possible rating for collaboration on joint projects)? ” From here, the situation and its issues can be deconstructed even further, to the asking of questions relating to specific projects, particular piece s or phases of specific projects, and the individual contri butions of each team member, with a Measure gap -analysis table for each individual team member’s responses. You then can see what each individual’s experience of working with the team is, and create an overall table that show s the averages of each column. To protect the confidentiality of each individual team member who contributed to the figures , the overall table would be used when work ing with the team . In Organization A, the team’s individual members were asked key questions that provided the analy st with the data or information to understand , or define, the problems facing the team, from the perspective of each team member. Each individual team member was asked the same questions, and the spoken information, or data, was categorized into themes by the analyst . These themes are the variables , and the data that then needed to be subjected to the Measure part of DMAIC. To arrive at the Measure piece, each team member was asked to provide a numerical rating of the importance of the variable to successful t eam effectiveness. Each individual was then asked to provide a numerical rating for the level of skill satisfaction , to show how well the team performs in each variable now ( second column ). The results from each team member were then examined and analyzed in the Analyze phase of DMAIC. In the example, the results from one team member are presented. The opportunities for Improve and Control are found in the third column, Gap in Points . Improve recommendations must be specific, pr ecise, and measurable. Here, you return to the creation of specific, measurable, attainable, realistic and relevant, and time -bound (SMART) goals, which the c onflict s pecialist would help the team generate. In Control, the conflict specialist assist s the team to be sure that the specific goals are being met and that the team i s moving toward working autonomously. Measure Gap -Analysis Table Organization A (Variables) Importance (Percent of inputs that are critical or very important) Skill Satisfaction (Percent of skill ratings at better than average) Gap in Points (Re frame as possible opportunity; t he higher the number, the more important satisfaction of the gap is) Interdepartmental Team Collaboration on Projects 98 23 75 Inter departmental Team Communication/ Verbal Delivery of Information 80 28 52 Effective Listening Among Individuals 95 15 80 Addressing Difficult Conversations 91 12 79 Written Communication/ Email 82 32 50 Interdepartmental Team Meetings/ Live Presentations 85 48 37 Interdepartmental Team Meetings/ Virtual Presentations 40 67 -27 *Negative number indicates that the issue is unimportant and skill satisfaction is higher than the importance For more information on qualitative research, variables, and qualita tive methodologies, see Research Methods: Qualitative Approach . For more information on working with teams and generating team effectiveness, consult the following : Doyle, M., & Straus, D. (1993). How to make meetings work: The new interaction method. New York, N.Y.: Berkley. Schwarz, R. (2002). The skilled facilitator: A comprehensive resource for consultants, facilitators, manager, trainers, and co aches (2nd ed. ). San Francisco, CA: Jossey -Bass.
Discussion: Quantifying Qualitative Information in the Measure Phase of the DMAIC Process Model First, read Chapter 5 in The Essential Workplace Conflict Handbook and review your work with SMART goals
Organization A Example Flowchart Organization A: Flowchart for team effectiveness, Measure phase Prepare: Define problem(s) Process: Interview team members, collecting findings Ask: Each variable’s importance START Record interviews, transcribe, create findings Prepare : Write interview questions Document questions Ask: Each variable’s satisfaction gap Record interviews, transcribe Document: Importance and satisfaction gap responses Process: Examine findings for common themes Prepare to analyze Process: Re -interview team members Input to gap -analysis table Reflect and revise STOP

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