Instructions Use the CSU Online Library Attached and review a scholarly article found in a peer-reviewed journal related to HR selection methods, analyzing work, designing jobs, or HR planning. In p

Our papers are 100% unique and written following academic standards and provided requirements. Get perfect grades by consistently using our writing services. Place your order and get a quality paper today. Rely on us and be on schedule! With our help, you'll never have to worry about deadlines again. Take advantage of our current 20% discount by using the coupon code GET20


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper

Instructions

Use the CSU Online Library Attached and review a scholarly article found in a peer-reviewed journal related to HR selection methods, analyzing work, designing jobs, or HR planning. In peer-reviewed journals, the articles were reviewed by other professionals in the field to ensure the accuracy and quality of the articles, which is ideal when writing an article critique.


Research tip:

When researching using the databases, you can limit your search to only peer-reviewed articles. To do this, look for the phrase “limit results,” and select “peer-reviewed articles.”

Once you have selected your article, follow the below criteria:

  • There is a minimum requirement of 500 words for the article critique.
  • Write a summary of the article. This should be one to three paragraphs in length, depending on the length of the article. Include the purpose for the article, how research was conducted, the results, and other pertinent information from the article.
  • Identify the selection criteria and methods and how they relate to hiring at the organization in the article.
  • Discuss the meaning or implication of the results of the study that the article covers. This should be one to two paragraphs. This is where you offer your opinion on the article. Discuss any flaws with the article, how you think it could have been better, and what you think it all means.
  • Write one paragraph discussing how the author could expand on the results, what the information means in the big picture, what future research should focus on, or how future research could move the topic forward. Discuss how knowledge in the area could be expanded.

Any sources used, including the textbook and the article, must be referenced; paraphrased and quoted material must have accompanying citations in APA format.

Instructions Use the CSU Online Library Attached and review a scholarly article found in a peer-reviewed journal related to HR selection methods, analyzing work, designing jobs, or HR planning. In p
R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018ISSN 1808-057X194DOI: 10.1590/1808-057x201805850O A Impact of an enabling performance measurement system on task performance and job satisfactionGuilherme Eduardo de SouzaUniversidade Federal da Integração Latino-Americana, Foz do Iguaçu, PR, Brazil Email: [email protected] Maria BeurenUniversidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Contabilidade, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil Email: [email protected] on 05.19.2017 – Desk acceptance on 07.31.2017 – 2nd version approved on 01.01.2018ABSTRACTT is study analyzes the impact of a Performance Measurement System (PMS) with enabling characteristics, mediated by psychological empowerment, on task performance and job satisfaction in a Shared Services Center (SSC). T e literature on management controls has sought to identify elements that are capable of improving performance, and the enabling controls associated with psychological empowerment may bring new clues to this discussion. Given the ability of the context to af ect individuals’ perceptions, it is important to understand the impacts of controls on satisfaction, which can lead to practices that are more aligned with their expectations and favorable results for the organization. T e results of the study indicate that the characteristics of a PMS af ect the motivation of individuals, so that implementing systems with enabling characteristics can contribute to employees’ perceptions regarding their control over and autonomy in their work. In the mechanistic structure of the SSC, the way in which PMSs are shaped can avoid potential adverse results from less organic structures in employees’ perceptions of psychological empowerment. A survey was conducted at a SSC located in southern Brazil, which provides administrative, f nancial, and accounting services. Eighty-eight of the 125 operational employees participated, corresponding to 70% of the total. T e research tool used was based on the assertions of the studies conducted by Mahama and Cheng (2013), Spreitzer (1995), Tarrant and Sabo (2010), and Van Der Hauwaert and Bruggeman (2015). Structural Equation Modeling was used to test the hypotheses. Evidence drawn from the research indicates that the use of an enabling PMS can contribute to the balance needed in companies between levels of formal controls and psychological empowerment to obtain employee job satisfaction and task performance. Keywords: Enabling PMS, task performance, job satisfaction, psychological empowerment, Shared Services Center.Correspondence address: Ilse Maria Beuren Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Contabilidade Campus Universitário Reitor João David Ferreira Lima – CEP: 88040-900 Trindade – Florianópolis – SC – Brazil R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 195 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren 1. INTRODUCTION Management control systems (MCSs), which are composed of management accounting, planning, budgeting, project management, information and reporting, and performance measurement systems (Simons, 1992), aim to inf uence the behavior and obtain the cooperation of groups of individuals or units towards an organization’s objectives (Flamholtz, Das & Tsui, 1985). According to Widener (2014), factors related to human behavior are the main explanation for the variance in the performance of organizations. Within this context, performance measurement systems (PMSs) provide support tools that of er a broad overview of the main processes and the levels of achievement of an organization’s objectives (Franco-Santos, Lucianetti & Bourne, 2012). T ese systems enable the strategy for the whole f rm to unfold, by communicating what are considered to be the main factors, such as customer service, sales, and production, moving up through the management levels and culminating in senior management (Demartini, 2014). In addition, studies that address elements of PMSs highlight that characteristics of the work, such as feedback (Liden, Wayne & Sparrowe, 2000) and management practices that involve the sharing of information, responsibility, and accountability (Seibert, Silver & Randolph, 2004), can af ect individuals’ job satisfaction. However, adapting this system to the needs of an organization and the individuals in it requires care with its design, implementation, use, and scope (Chenhall, 2003; Hall, 2008). Due to their complexity, PMSs have been studied using various approaches, based on economic, sociological, or psychological theories or combinations of them, in an attempt to shed light of the mechanisms underlying these systems (Franco-Santos et al. 2012). The psychological approach enables PMSs to be understood from the individual’s point of view (Birnberg, Luf & Shields, 2006). T is approach is relevant considering that company performance begins at the individual level (Mahama & Cheng, 2013). In addition to this is the fact that a company’s structure and processes can shape the actions of its staf . In this context, management accounting practices present in PMSs can inf uence individuals’ mental representations by establishing goals, changing reference points, and altering beliefs. T e introduction of demands leads to tensions, inconsistencies, and conf icts that can af ect individuals’ ef orts, which can generate motivation, leading individuals towards the goals and objectives, or demotivation, resulting in dissatisfaction, a reduction in self-esteem and interpersonal trust, and a sense of lost control (Adler & Borys, 1996; Birnberg et al., 2006). PMSs cover informational elements, feedback, feedforward, and rewards (Demartini, 2014), which are susceptible to af ecting psychological empowerment and favoring performance at the individual level of analysis, such as managerial (Hall, 2008; Marginson, Mcaulay, Roush & Van Zijl, 2014) and task performance (Mahama & Cheng, 2013). However, studies to identify the mechanisms by which characteristics of a PMS inf uence the perception of employees regarding their work environment, motivation, and consequently their behavior and attitudes, have generally investigated isolated characteristics of accounting practices, such as the providing of feedback, access to information, goal characteristics, and the visibility of processes (Birnberg et al., 2006; Franco-Santos et al., 2012; Liden et al., 2000; Seibert et al., 2004). Few studies have analyzed such aspects in combination, based on the PMS, such as Hall (2008), when addressing the comprehensibility of these systems, and Marginson et al. (2014), when analyzing the ef ects of using f nancial and non-f nancial measures. T e logic underlying psychological empowerment derives from the idea of individuals having a sense of control over their work environment (Spreitzer, 2008). Psychological empowerment can lead to positive results by giving employees more involvement, control, and autonomy in their activities, which occur via individuals’ joint perception of meaning, impact, competence, and self-determination in their work environment (Spreitzer, 2008). Empowerment apparently signals a conf ict with the idea of managerial control. Employees’ need to be f exible in order to adapt to changes coexists in companies with their need to apply management controls in their processes to ensure the ef cient use of resources and monitor results (Ahrens & Chapman, 2004; Simons, 1992). If on one hand the perception in incentivizing greater autonomy in the work leads to favorable results, which range from improving motivation to raising the employees’ and consequently the company’s ability to respond (Spreitzer, 2008), on the other hand management controls are needed for ef cient processes. In this context, as a way of distinguishing between good and bad rules present in management processes, and consequently ref ected in the management controls and in the dif erent results arising from their application, Ahrens and Chapman (2004) used the T eory of Bureaucratic R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 196 Impact of an enabling performance measurement system on task performance and job satisfaction Formalization from Adler and Borys (1996) to suggest that formal control systems can have enabling or cohesive characteristics. T us, organizational processes can be designed (i) in an enabling way, by granting employees more responsibility and autonomy, or (ii) in a coercive way, by designing rigid processes that are barely interactive. Such elements, when applied to management controls, suggest that enabling controls can favor greater employee integration with their work activities, while coercive controls work in the opposite direction (Ahrens & Chapman, 2004). Coercive and enabling controls provide an alternative analysis for explaining the use of controls at dif erent levels of a company, so that it can execute the strategy of reducing production costs and at the same time be more f exible (Ahrens & Chapman, 2004). However, to evaluate these relationships, it is necessary to pay attention to the context of the study, which in this case is a Shared Services Center (SSC). Kuntz and Roberts (2014) state that organizations have been relocating their support activities to foreign subsidiaries in order to obtain the benef ts of economies of scale and favorable labor market conditions in other countries. One example of this are SSCs, which are structures that concentrate an organization’s administrative support activities, reducing the duplicity of departments and of ering ef ciency by processing a large volume of transactions at reduced costs (Schulz & Brenner, 2010). Notwhithstanding, recent studies suggest that these relocations can cause adverse ef ects on integration, for example, in the control and quality of the relationships between managers and head of ce, impacting on motivational and attitudinal aspects (Ishzaka & Blakiston, 2012). T ese studies have addressed the problem in terms of the costs related to relocation decisions and the organizational performance of these decisions, ignoring adverse ef ects, their impacts on the individual, and the use of psychological approaches to understand their ef ects (Kuntz & Roberts, 2014; Richter & Bruhl, 2017). T us, the following research question arises: what are the impacts of the enabling performance measurement system, via psychological empowerment, on task performance and job satisfaction in an SSC? T is study aims to analyze the impacts of the PMS with enabling characteristics, mediated by psychological empowerment, on task performance and job satisfaction in an SSC. The studies on psychological empowerment have focused on management levels in companies (Yuliansyah & Khan, 2015). When listing the antecedents and consequences associated with empowerment, Spreitzer (1995) indicated the need to also confirm the relationship at the operational level (lower-level employees). However, the number of studies for this level of analysis is limited (Yuliansyah & Khan, 2015). It should also be verif ed how these relationships are structured in service providing companies and in dif erent organizational designs (Chenhall, 2003). A dif erent way of organizing the operations of a company are through SSCs (Bergeron, 2003), the focus of this study, in which the main hypothesis is that enabling PMSs mediated by psychological empowerment are positively associated with task performance and job satisfaction of individuals at the operational level. T e aim is to contribute with evidence that using an enabling PMS favors the balance needed between levels of formal control and psychological empowerment in task performance. T e SSC structure can provide new evidence for the discussion on psychological empowerment, as it concerns decentralized units in the hierarchy of an organization, but which are highly dependent on resources from other units, meaning they have little autonomy (Bergeron, 2003). SSCs are geared towards seeking high operational ef ciency, through standardized processes and service levels that are pre-agreed with the areas of the organization that have transferred their administrative activities to the SSC. T e use of detailed working manuals is therefore recurrent (Bergeron, 2003), which can interfere in the individuals’ sense of control and in the PMS, as well as impacting task performance and job satisfaction. 2. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK In the work environment, empowerment involves two distinct dimensions: (i) sociostructural, which concerns the contextual factors that enable the emergence of empowerment, such as practices, policies, and structures, and (ii) psychological, involving individuals’ perceptions of empowerment in light of the practices, policies, and structures that surround them (Spreitzer, 2008). T us, it is possible to def ne psychological empowerment as a psychological state experienced by individuals that indicates the success of the structural conditions of empowerment. Empowerment is related with individuals’ access to the tools of power mentioned by Kanter (1977), def ned as opportunities, resources, information, and support (Spreitzer, 2008). From this perspective, power means having control over organizational resources and the R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 197 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren individuals’ possibilities for taking decisions that are relevant to their role or job (Spreitzer, 2008). From this viewpoint, a PMS can be understood as an element of sociostructural empowerment, since it concerns a management practice that involves decisions about the use and control of resources, the establishment of goals, changes in points of reference, feedback and feedforward information, and aspects of tasks, among others (Birnberg et al., 2006; Franco-Santos et al., 2012), which are of en related to opportunities, resources, information, and support. T is relationship between PMS and psychological empowerment could be stimulated with the use of enabling PMSs, which can be understood as those that enable users more interaction, learning, use of skills, and an understanding of their logic, via the characteristics of repair, f exibility, internal transparency, and global transparency (Van Der Hauwaert & Bruggeman, 2015). To stimulate empowerment, organizations can alter their structure, processes, policies, and practices in a way that incentivizes the use of high involvement systems, which includes participative decision making, performance systems based on knowledge and skills, and open f ow information systems as a way of increasing access to opportunities, information, support, and resources between all hierarchical levels (Spreitzer, 2008). Birnberg et al. (2006) show that the psychological studies on accounting practices have indicated that informational and motivational elements derived from such practices can inf uence the way individuals regulate their ef orts and process information, in a way that is ref ected in their levels of performance and satisfaction. T us, it is suggested that an enabling PMS may be positively associated with job satisfaction and task performance via psychological empowerment. It follows that both motivational and informational ef ects can occur within the scope of such systems, since they stimulate subjective processes and inf uence the behavior of individuals via cognitive, motivational, and social mechanisms derived from the use of information for monitoring, measurement, and performance assessment activities, as indicated by the studies from Hall (2008) and Marginson et al. (2014), and they also enable greater individual involvement with the power mechanisms from Kanter (1977). 2.1 Enabling PMS and Task Performance A PMS is characterized as a formal organizational control (Simons, 1992) with a range of f nancial and non-f nancial, informational, and assessment indicators, connected by a causal relationship between indicators and objectives, shaped according to the context and used to calculate the performance of a company at all its levels, as well as enabling individual learning and development (Franco-Santos et al., 2012). T e control is based on two main concerns: (i) the design of the informational system and accountability, that is, the operating rules, which refer to the activities that the individuals carry out in an organization; and (ii) the behavior or enforcement rules, which should motivate the individual towards the organizational objectives (Demartini, 2014). In this context, the concept of bureaucratic formalization (Adler & Borys, 1996) suggests that, as in the design of systems and machines, the design of organizational processes should be characterized both by a fool-proof ng logic and by a usability logic. Adler and Borys (1996) suggested a reanalysis of bureaucracy based on the concern about the type of bureaucracy instituted in companies. T e authors retrieve the dimensions that compose a system for the user and apply them in the organizational area to explain the enabling characteristics, as presented in Table 1. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 198 Impact of an enabling performance measurement system on task performance and job satisfaction Table 1 Dimensions of enabling systems Dimensions Description Repair This is the ease with which a system can be repaired. This characteristic enables the users themselves to repair the process instead of having their work interrupted because of a f aw or impasse. Internal transparency The logic behind the internal functioning and information about the statu s of the system are available and are presented in an intelligible way for the user, who can correct errors. Global transparency This refers to the intelligibility of the system. It is the ability of th e system to provide the users with a range of information on the state of the entire production process. Flexibility This offers and suggests options for the user to decide. Flexible systems enable the user to modify the interface and add functionalities to meet specif c demands. Source: Adapted from Adler and Borys (1996). The processes that follow the usability logic are categorized as enabling formalization and the four characteristics are indicated in Table 1. T ese are designed so that employees are able to deal with the contingencies of their work, by stimulating the resolution of problems using their abilities and intelligence, with more open processes and exposure to their underlying logic, in a relationship that enables the development of learning (Adler & Borys, 1996). Within this logic, problems are inevitable and it is desirable to of er mechanisms that support their resolution instead of exerting ef orts in the elaboration of error-proof processes (Adler & Borys, 1996). In contrast, the processes designed using the fool- proof ng logic are typif ed as coercive formalization, focusing on compliance with rules and procedures, and they aim to obtain employee ef ort by imposing norms and monitoring their activities. Employees are seen as a possible source of problems and the processes therefore aim to mitigate the possibility of their occurrence (Adler & Borys, 1996). A PMS with enabling characteristics allows users to observe the cause and ef ect relationship of their activities both in local processes and in the overall company result, it of ers customization of indicators for specif c situations, and corrects processes that have presented problems. Such aspects increase the possibility for learning since they stimulate the users’ understanding with regards to the logic of the process and it of ers information about the degree to which goals are achieved, which can raise task performance (Hall, 2008; Mahama & Cheng, 2013). T e f rst hypothesis is thus formulated: H1: enabling PMSs are positively associated with task performance. 2.2 Enabling PMS and Psychological Empowerment Based on the ideas of Conger and Kanungo (1988), T omas and Velthouse (1990) elaborated a framework that def nes psychological empowerment as the intrinsic motivation of tasks that occurs via four cognitions or mental states that shape the individual’s orientation with regards to his/her role at work and which are susceptible to the inf uence of the work environment. Spreitzer (2008) highlights that for individuals to experience the feeling of psychological empowerment, the four dimensions shown in Table 2 need to arise; otherwise its ef ects will be limited. Table 2 Dimensions of psychological empowerment Dimension Description Meaning This implies consistency between job requirements and individual beliefs, values, and behaviors. Competence This refers to the level of self-eff cacy of the individual with regards to his/her work. It concerns belief in the individual skills to adequately carry out the work activities. Self-determination This concerns the individual’s feelings of choice and control over his/her work and is ref ected in the autonomy to decide with regards to the methods, effort, and rhythm of his/her activities. Impact This corresponds to the individual’s belief regarding his/her ability to inf uence important issues in the organization, such as its results. Source: Adapted from Spreitzer (1995, 2008). R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 199 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren As already highlighted, an enabling PMS affects contextual factors present in the practices that characterize sociostructural empowerment, for example the need for a system with an open logic, incentives for involvement, and access to information and opportunities. In this sense, enabling controls of er more interaction between the system and its users since they allow them to make corrections and adaptations, they institute the need to of er transparency, both at the individual level and in the general impacts of their activities, and they of er f exibility by designing a system that gives support to the user (Adler & Borys, 1996). Psychological empowerment, in turn, derives from conditions in which employees feel that their work has meaning, from conditions for them to adequately carry out their activities, autonomy for them to decide what to do and how, and the feeling that they can impact their work environment (Spreitzer, 2008). T e aspects pointed out of er indications that there is an alignment between both, given that the characteristics of an enabling system are aligned with the feelings that form part of the concept of psychological empowerment. In addition, according to Hall (2008), characteristics of a PMS that increase its ability to of er relevant information can positively impact and reinforce the four dimensions of psychological empowerment since they increase the ability for individual initiative, they provide greater knowledge regarding performance and the abilities needed to carry out the tasks, and they make individuals feel valued. Considering that an enabling PMS includes, among its prerogatives, increasing individual involvement, as well as access to information that is considered relevant, the second research hypothesis was formulated: H2: enabling PMSs are positively associated with psychological empowerment. 2.3 Enabling PMS and Job Satisfaction T e relationship between PMS and job satisfaction has been explained via the mediating variables, for example trust in the supervisor and fairness in the assessment procedures (Franco-Santos et al., 2012). However, it is argued in the study that there can be elements in an enabling PMS with similarities to other concepts that involve the dissemination of information, encouragement of the use of skill, and learning, which can explain a possible direct association between enabling PMSs and job satisfaction. One example is structural empowerment, which is normally employed in research on high involvement practices and high performance human resources practices (HPHRP). T e increase in structural empowerment perceived by employees would come about via access to information, resources needed to carry out the work, support, and opportunities for learning and growth (Laschinger, Finegan, Shamian, & Wilk, 2001). In contrast, enabling PMSs stimulate the dissemination of information and the occurrence of feedback, identifying problems and their solution through the employee’s ability, identif cation of learning opportunities, and help in prioritizing actions, and with this they provide employees with mechanisms to better carry out their work and shape an environment that favors their development (Wouter & Wilderon, 2008). Laschinger, Finegan, Shamian, and Wilk (2004) verif ed that elements of structural empowerment are directly related with job satisfaction, such as: acquiring new skills and using one’s abilities to carry out tasks (opportunity); having access to information on the status of activities, knowing the objectives and values of the organization (information); obtaining performance feedback and help in resolving problems (support); and having time for work demands and obtaining temporary help when necessary (resources). T is suggests that individuals exposed to better structural conditions with more access to the support and resources needed to carry out their activities would have greater job satisfaction (Laschinger et al., 2004). Kanter (1977) suggests that individuals who do not have access to resources, information, support, and opportunity experience feelings of impotence that impede their perception of psychological empowerment. T is can lead to feelings of frustration and failure since they feel stagnated in their work and without mobility (Spreitzer, 2008). T e use of an enabling PMS can make employees feel that they have the resources and the support needed to perform their tasks and thus obtain job satisfaction, since this PMS potentially enables access to the elements mentioned by Kanter (1977) and Laschinger et al. (2004), such as access to information, support, and learning. In addition, studies that address elements of HPHRP have found positive associations with job satisfaction. HPHRPs constitute human resource management practices designed to promote the well-being and commitment of employees (Mostafa & Gould-Willians, 2014). Although there is no agreement regarding what practices constitute HPHRP, they are considered to promote the ability of employees, communication, opportunity, and motivation (Mostafa & Gould-Willians, 2014), which are aspects that share a similarity with enabling PMSs. PMSs are commonly associated with performance pay policies and career development, so a system that enables users to understand the logic behind their evaluations R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 200 Impact of an enabling performance measurement system on task performance and job satisfaction enables its use as a means of supporting their activities, it opens up room for learning, and can provide positive results in attitudinal and behavioral aspects (Wouters & Roijimans, 2011). The third hypothesis was thus formulated: H 3: enabling PMSs are positively associated with job satisfaction. 2.4 Psychological Empowerment and Task Performance Studies have observed that psychological empowerment is positively related to managerial ef ectiveness (Spreitzer, 1995), employee effectiveness (Spreitzer, Kizilos & Nason, 1997), and task performance (Mahama & Cheng, 2013). Liden et al. (2000) verified that in a sample of employees from the base of the hierarchy of a services company in the United States the competence dimension of psychological empowerment was positively and signif cantly associated with job performance. In a sample of Australian managers from manufacturing units, Hall (2008) verif ed that the meaning dimension was associated with performance. Marginson et al. (2014) observed a signif cant and positive relationship between the performance of non-f nancial measures and the competence, meaning, and self-determination dimensions of psychological empowerment in a sample of managers from a multinational telecommunications company. Studies on this topic have observed that task performance derives from dif erent characteristics in each one of the four dimensions of psychological empowerment: (i) competence relates to greater ef ort, high expectations of goals, and persistence in challenging situations; (ii) meaning relates to a high commitment and concentration of energy in the task; (iii) self-determination relates to learning, interest in the activity, and resilience; and (iv) impact relates to facing dif cult situations and high task performance (Mahama & Cheng, 2013; Spreitzer, 1995). Psychological empowerment as a unique construct was investigated by Chiang and Hsieh (2012), who verif ed a positive and signif cant association with the performance of hotel workers in Taiwan. T ese authors argued that psychological empowerment leads individuals to trust in their ability to meet the demands of their work and have fewer doubts about themselves and their work, which results in better performance. Laschinger et al. (2004) explain that individuals with a perception of psychological empowerment react to adversities in their work, show persistence and ingenuity in order to overcome obstacles, seek to inf uence the objectives and operational procedures that can improve the quality of the results, anticipate problems, and react better to risks and uncertainties of the environment. Psychological empowerment can also increase resilience, initiative, and concentration, as well as triggering the perception that individuals are able to inf uence their work, leading to proactive behavior towards their activities, which translates into ef ective task performance (Mahama & Cheng, 2013; Spreitzer, 1995, 2008). From this perspective, the fourth research hypothesis was elaborated: H4: psychological empowerment is positively associated with task performance. 2.5 Psychological Empowerment and Job Satisfaction Bordin, Bartram, and Casimir (2006) argue that all the dimensions of psychological empowerment are susceptible to positively impacting job satisfaction. Impact increases job involvement since individuals can visualize the ef ects of their actions on organizational results (Bordin et al., 2006), self-determination allows greater control over their routine (Spreitzer, 2008), competence indicates that individuals have the ability and knowledge needed to carry out their activities, which enables them to approach them adequately and assertively (Bordin et al., 2006), and meaning indicates that employees are dedicated to achieving objectives that are aligned with their values (Spreitzer, 2008). Holdsworth and Cartwright (2003) researched employees in the call center of an English company and observed that the impact and self-determination dimensions are positively related with job satisfaction. Liden et al. (2000) verif ed that for employees at the base of the hierarchy of a large North American services company the meaning dimension was positively associated with job satisfaction. By operationalizing psychological empowerment in a single construct, He, Murrmann, and Perdue (2010) verif ed that among employees of a North American services organization those with the greatest psychological empowerment reported the highest job satisfaction. When evaluating the inf uence of empowerment in the work environment, Liden et al. (2000) argued that it is ref ected in the perception of job satisfaction when people: (i) are involved in work activities that have meaning; (ii) have a sense of control over their work; (iii) are involved in decision-making processes; and (iv) feel able to carry out their roles. Wang and Lee (2009) argued that characteristics of a job that promote feelings of psychological empowerment can foster emotional states that are able to inf uence satisfaction. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 201 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren Higher levels of job satisfaction, with regards to career, rewards, relationships with peers and superiors, and the nature of the work, have been indicated by employees who feel that: (i) their work has meaning for them; (ii) they have the skills needed to carry out their activities; (iii) they can make choices related to their work routine; and (iv) they recognize the impacts of their actions on the organization (Spreitzer, 2008). T is association occurs since individuals that experience psychological empowerment perceive the fulf llment of their needs in a more intrinsic way (Seibert, Wang & Cortright, 2011). T is thus leads to the f f h research hypothesis: H5: psychological empowerment is positively associated with job satisfaction. 2.6 Enabling PMS, Psychological Empowerment, and Task Performance Drake, Wong, and Salter (2007) analyzed elements of PMSs related to psychological empowerment and performance with the aim of understanding the joint ef ects of the two elements of a PMS on employees at the operational level: feedback and remuneration schemes. Evidence from the study indicated that feedback af ects performance via the impact dimension of psychological empowerment and remuneration schemes based on earnings can negatively inf uence the competence and self-determination dimensions. Regarding the enabling characteristics, Mahama and Cheng (2013) verif ed the relationship between enabling systems and psychological empowerment restricted to enabling costing systems. Despite not f nding a direct association between these constructs, they found that their association can occur indirectly via the intensity of use of the system. Hall (2008) investigated the role of psychological empowerment and clarity of roles in the relationship between the comprehensibility of a PMS and performance. He inferred that the comprehensibility of the informational characteristics of the PMS can inf uence manager performance, but an inf uence on performance was only found via the meaning dimension of empowerment. Yuliansyah and Khan (2015) replicated the model from Hall (2008), changing the context from managers of Australian industries to operational level employees from the f nancial services area in Indonesia. Besides the meaning dimension, the competence and self- determination dimensions contributed to the relationship between PMS and performance, which reinforces the impacts of the context on the investigations regarding psychological empowerment. Seibert et al. (2004) observed that the impacts of management practices related to the sharing of information, autonomy to explore limits, responsibility and accountability of teams for performance, and job satisfaction depend on the perception of employees with respect to these practices, which implies investigating ways of inf uencing the psychological aspect of organizational practices. Therefore, an enabling PMS can influence task performance via psychological empowerment since studies have indicated a relationship between management practices that stimulate the sharing of information, decentralization, training, and feedback, with an increase in the control, knowledge, skills, and motivation of employees, enabling better behavioral results such as task performance and the achievement of organizational objectives (Seibert et al., 2011). Enabling PMSs, seen as an element of structural empowerment, constitute an organizational component that can lead employees to the perception of psychological empowerment, and indirectly to task performance. T us, the sixth research hypothesis was formulated: H6a: enabling PMSs mediated by psychological empowerment are positively associated with task performance. 2.7 Enabling PMS, Psychological Empowerment, and Job Satisfaction Management practices that involve elements such as the sharing of information, decentralization, participative decision making, extensive training, and contingent compensation can af ect the four dimensions of psychological empowerment since they increase the quantity of information and autonomy of employees in their work and they broaden the knowledge and skills related to the work activities and motivation the individuals, enabling them to fulf ll their intrinsic needs and raising their job satisfaction (Seibert et al., 2011). Bordin et al. (2006) found a positive association between access to information and job satisfaction in a sample of information technology (IT) workers in Singapore. Chan, Nadler, and Hargis (2015) observed a positive association between psychological empowerment and job satisfaction in a sample of sports material distribution workers in the United States. Taken together, the f ndings may indicate an indirect relationship between the variables. Studies from Laschinger et al. (2001, 2004) of workers from the healthcare f eld have indicated that work environment conditions related to information, skills, knowledge, learning, feedback, and support exert an inf uence on R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 202 Impact of an enabling performance measurement system on task performance and job satisfaction job satisfaction via psychological empowerment. Liden et al. (2000) found evidence that the characteristics of the work, such as task identity, meaning of tasks, and feedback, are indirectly related with job satisfaction via the meaning and competence dimensions. The mechanisms underlying this relationship cover three critical psychological states associated with job characteristics: meaning experienced, responsibility experienced, and knowledge regarding the results. Seibert et al. (2004) verified that psychological empowerment can act as a mediator of key organizational practices (sharing of information, autonomy, and accountability of teams) and of job satisfaction. T ey highlight that the sharing of information implies providing information on costs, productivity, quality, and f nancial performance of employees, while autonomy includes organizational practices and structures that enable autonomous actions such as a clear vision and objectives, work procedures, and areas of responsibility.T e evidence provided by the studies enables it to be inferred that an enabling PMS has characteristics related to the sharing of information, clarity of objectives and goals, and the possibility for learning and using skills that are able to inf uence job satisfaction, by enabling the individual to experience feelings of psychological empowerment. In this sense, the seventh research hypothesis was elaborated: H6b: enabling PMSs mediated by psychological empowerment are positively associated with job satisfaction. Figure 1 illustrates the representation of the research constructs with the relationships proposed in the hypotheses formulated in this study. According to the f gure, the focus of the investigation is on the impacts of enabling PMSs, composed of the repair, f exibility, internal transparency, and global transparency dimensions in task performance and in job satisfaction, via the psychological empowerment composed of the self-determination, competence, impact, and meaning dimensions in an SSC. Figure 1 Theoretical model of the study SD = self-determination; CT = competence; FX = f exibility; IM = impact; PMS = performance measurement system; RP = repair; MN = meaning; GT = global transparency; IT = internal transparency. Source: Elaborated by the authors. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 203 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren 3. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY T is study was carried out using a survey of operational level employees in an SSC. An SSC was identif ed in which the operational staf had access to performance assessment mechanisms and where there were no dif erences between the sectors regarding the form of access and assessment. T e SSC was selected by sending invites containing the study prospectus. Af er identifying the potential participant, contacts were made via telephone and presentially in order to detail the research. T e SSC that was the object of study is located in southern Brazil and carries out back of ce activities in the structure of a company whose head of ce is in Europe. All in all, the overall structure of the SSC has 1,900 employees who attend to 90 units in 25 countries. T e back of ce unit of the Brazilian SSC, the object of this study, attends to approximately 16% of the total volume of operations, with 125 operational employees (41 analysts and 84 assistants) who act in direct contact with the clients, in this case other units of the company, of ering administrative, f nancial, and accounting services. T e participation of 88 respondents was obtained, who were spread between the procure-to-pay (63.64%), record-to- report (20.45%), order-to-cash (11.36%), and support (4.55%) sectors. T ese sectors correspond to all the areas that provide the unit’s services. 3.1 Constructs and Research Instrument Table 3 reports the constructs, their operational definition, the number of assertions used in each dimension in the questionnaire, and the respective references. Table 3 Research construct Constructs VariablesOperational def nition QuestionsReferences Enabling PMS Repair Possibility for the users themselves to repair a process instead to forcing the interruption of the work when faced with a f aw or impasse. 3 Van Der Hauwaert and Bruggeman (2015) Internal transparency The logic behind the functioning of a process and the information about its status are available and are presented in an intelligible way. 3 Global transparency Availability of information for the user regarding the state of the entire production process. 3 Flexibility Possibility for employees to modify processes to attend to specif c demands. 3 Psychological empowerment Self-determination Autonomy of the individual to decide on the methods, efforts, and rhythm of the activities. 3 Spreitzer (1995) Competence Individual abilities to adequately develop the work activities. 3 Impact Inf uence of the individual over strategic, administrative, and operational results. 3 Meaning Coherence between job requirements and individual beliefs, values, and behaviors. 3 Job satisfaction Job satisfaction Emotional response to physical and social conditions in the locations and job tasks. 6 Tarrant and Sabo (2010) Task performance Task performanceLevel with which the individuals carry out the specif c tasks of their job. 6 Mahama and Cheng (2013) PMS = performance measurement system. Source: Elaborated by the authors. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 204 Impact of an enabling performance measurement system on task performance and job satisfaction The research instrument was elaborated using assertions already validated in other studies, but their joint use is specif c to this study. Although the concept of enabling PMS has been used before, the studies have done so in a qualitative way (Jordan & Messner, 2012; Mundy, 2010; Wouters & Roijmans, 2011; Wouters & Wilderon, 2008). T us, in order to capture the repair, internal transparency, global transparency, and f exibility dimensions that compose the enabling controls, the instrument from Van Der Hauwaert and Bruggeman (2015) was used, which is the only one found up until then that proposed studying enabling PMSs using a quantitative approach. Based on the studies from Adler and Borys (1996) and Ahrens and Chapman (2004), they elaborated a questionnaire to investigate PMSs, reporting the procedures used to validate the instrument, such as carrying out factor analysis and adjustment indices. T e self-determination, competence, impact, and meaning dimensions that compose psychological empowerment were captured using the research instrument from Spreitzer (1995), developed based on the studies from Conger and Kanungo (1988) and T omas and Velthouse (1990). T is questionnaire has already been replicated in studies on PMSs by Hall (2008) and Yuliansyah and Khan (2015). In order to capture the one-dimensional construct of job satisfaction, the Job Satisfaction Index from Tarrant and Sabo (2010) was used. T is instrument was elaborated to evaluate the satisfaction of workers in the healthcare f eld. Its version in Portuguese was validated by Palomino and Frezatti (2016) in a study on conf ict and ambiguity of roles involving Brazilian controllers. In order to capture the one-dimensional construct of tasks performance, the questionnaire from Mahama and Cheng (2013) was used, which is a reduced version of the instrument from Kathuria and Davis (2001) conceived based on the study from Carroll and Schneier (1982). T e survey instrument was based on a seven-point Likert scale, which is consistent with the original instruments. T e instrument was customized, paying attention to the vocabulary used in the unit, in order to avoid ambiguities. T e survey was applied presentially in the company in February 2016. T e day before the data were gathered by the human resources area, a communication was sent out to the employees asking for their participation and raising their awareness about the content of the study. T e data gathered were tabulated and subjected to statistical treatment in the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 21 (SPSS) and Smart PLS 3 sof ware packages. None of the 88 questionnaires presented missing values. T e relationships proposed in the theoretical model were analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). T is multivariate analysis technique enables a set of simultaneous relationships to be tested based on the explanation of the variance between the model constructs (Hair, Hult, Ringle & Sarstedt, 2016). Its application is considered appropriate in exploratory studies that seek to develop theories (Hair et al., 2016). 3.2 Construction of the Hierarchical Model T e model used employs second order variables. Higher order models or hierarchical component models are used when the aim is to analyze constructs at higher levels of abstraction. Second order latent variables (LVs) are created based on f rst order constructs that refer to their attributes (Hair et al., 2016). In addition, by reducing the quantity of relationships in the structural model, the PLS path model becomes more harmonious and comprehensible (Hair et al., 2016). T e hierarchical model in question is type II ref exive- formative. T e two-stage approach was chosen as it is the most indicated in complex path models in which there are second order variables in an endogenous position (Ringle, Sarstedt & Straub, 2012). Becker, Klein, and Wetzels (2012) indicated that the two-stage approach is one of the best approaches and of ers a useful alternative for studies that seek to only analyze second order relationships. T e enabling PMS and psychological empowerment constructs were obtained based on the scores for the four dimensions that make them up. T e enabling PMS integrates the repair, f exibility, internal, and global transparency dimensions, and their joint analysis based on one second order variable resembles the idea of general perception of the enabling controls, as used by Mahama and Cheng (2013). However, the authors used a one- dimensional scale, while in this study the four dimensions are recognized separately along with a general perception based on a second level of abstraction. Psychological empowerment, formed of competency, self-determination, impact, and meaning, is a concept that proposes the perception of its four dimensions simultaneously, forming a gestalt (Spreitzer, 2008); that is, the isolated dimensions are not enough to translate psychological empowerment. In a discussion about the statistical validity of using this construct segregated into its dimensions or in combination, Seibert et al. (2011) support the operationalization of the construct in combination, which motivated its use in this study as a second order variable. Although the enabling PMS and psychological empowerment variables are second order, for the purposes R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 205 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren of evaluating the measurement and structural models it is necessary to consider the results obtained with the f rst order model (Becker, Klein & Wetzels, 2012). For this reason, the results obtained with the model in the f rst stage of the two-stage approach are presented below; that is, detailing each dimension of the constructs measured. 4. DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS OF THE RESULTS 4.1 Evaluation of the Measurement and Structural Model In the evaluation of the structural model, convergent validity, composite reliability, and discriminant validity are considered. To conf rm the criteria recommended in the convergent validity, it was verif ed whether the indicators of each LV of the model share a common variance via an analysis of the factor loads of each indicator, of the average extracted variance (AVE) of the LVs, and the composite reliability and Cronbach’s alpha, which indicate the internal consistency (Hair et al., 2016). Table 4 presents these f nal values. It is noted in this table that all the factors present higher values than the minimum recommended, of 0.50 for AVE and 0.70 for CC and Cronbach’s alpha (Hair et al., 2016); that is, there is convergent validity and composite reliability in the proposed model. Table 4 Convergent validity and consistency of the constructs Variables AV EComposite reliability Cronbach’s alpha Repair 0.8070.9260.882 Flexibility 0.7600.9050.841 Internal transparency 0.6850.8670.771 Global transparency 0.7070.8790.794 Self-determination 0.8550.9460.915 Competence 0.8430.9410.906 Impact 0.8270.9350.895 Meaning 0.9410.9800.969 Job satisfaction 0.7540.9480.934 Task performance 0.6330.9110.883 AVE = average extracted variance. Source: Elaborated by the authors. Regarding the discriminant validity, which indicates how much one construct is individually distinct from the rest (Hair et al., 2016), the results of the cross-loadings matrix used in the variables were initially observed, indicating the inexistence of cross-loadings between the constructs of the model. Next, the criterion from Fornell and Larcker (1981) was verif ed, in which the square root of the AVE is compared with the correlation between the LVs. For there to be discriminant validity, it is recommended that the correlations between the constructs are greater than the square root of the AVE. Table 5 presents the values of the correlations between the variables and it is verif ed that none of the correlations between the constructs was greater than the square root of the AVE, indicating that there is discriminant validity (Fornell & Larcker, 1981). T us, the model fulf lls the main validity assumptions (convergent and discriminant). Table 6 presents the results of the structural model. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 206 Impact of an enabling performance measurement system on task performance and job satisfaction Table 5 Discriminant validity (Fornell & Larcker, 1981) Variables SDCT TPFXIM RP JSMN GT IT Self-determination (SD) 0.925 Competence (CT) 0.2810.918 Task performance (TP) 0.3500.3830.795 Flexibility (FX) 0.5210.0890.3590.872 Impact (IM) 0.6200.2610.4630.6250.909 Repair (RP) 0.4330.1050.2620.7030.4370.899 Job satisfaction (JS) 0.4920.0400.4200.6220.5300.4560.869 Meaning (MN) 0.5240.1740.4430.5570.6220.3330.7180.970 Global transparency (GT) 0.495 0.0840.3460.7740.5300.7380.6260.5180.841 Internal transparency (IT) 0.439 0.1130.3310.6890.5290.7070.4410.3520.7460.828 Source: Elaborated by the authors. Table 6 Results of the structural model Variables R 2 R2 adjustedQ 2 SRMR f 2 VIF Repair 0.000-0.0252.749 Flexibility 0.000-0.1343.470 Internal transparency 0.002-0.0302.830 Global transparency 0.000-0.0663.748 Self-determination 0.2950.2610.2120.0710.001-0.008 1.862 Competence 0.014-0.033 -0.022 0.0710.022-0.113 1.128 Impact 0.4140.3860.3260.0710.000-0.020 2.448 Meaning 0.3600.3290.3190.0710.041-0.329 1.998 Job satisfaction 0.6230.5850.4450.071 Task performance 0.3380.2710.1720.071 SRMR = standardized root mean square residual VIF = variance inf ation factor. Source: Elaborated by the authors. It is noted in Table 3 that the model’s predictive accuracy for the job satisfaction and task performance dimension is moderate (Peng & Lai, 2012), with R 2 and R 2 adjusted values that vary between 0.623/0.585 and 0.338/0.271, respectively. T e Q 2 values indicate whether the model has predictive relevance and should be higher than 0 (Peng & Lai, 2012). T erefore, the competence dimension of psychological empowerment does not meet this criterion, besides presenting an R 2 adjusted with a negative value, which indicates that its contribution to the model’s explanatory and predictive ability is not satisfactory. However, competence composes the theoretical construct of the four dimensions of psychological empowerment (Spreitzer, 2008); thus, the decision was made to maintain it, since the focus of this study is on evaluating the paths for the second order variables. T e value of the square root of the standardized residuals, which is lower than 0.08, indicates that the model f ts the needs of the empirical data (Latan, Ringle & Jabbour, 2016). T e values of the size of the ef ects vary from non-existent for repair  job satisfaction (f 2 = 0), f exibility  competence (f 2 = 0), global transparency  competence (f 2 = 0), and impact  job satisfaction, to medium ef ects, such as meaning  job satisfaction (f 2 = R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 207 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren 0,329). Finally, the values of the variance inf ation factor (VIF), which are lower than 5 for all the independent variables, indicate that there are no collinearity problems (Hair et al., 2016).Af er evaluating the structural measurement model, the path coef cient was calculated with 5,000 interactions. Next, the bootstrapping technique was applied to evaluate the level of signif cance between the relationships of the constructs, using 5,000 subsamples, a bias-corrected and accelerated conf dence interval, and a one-tailed test at a 5% level of signif cance (Hair et al., 2016; Marginson et al., 2014). Based on the bootstrapping, the path values, t-value, and p-value of each relationship were obtained, as shown in Table 7. Table 7 Effects between the constructs Relationship between the constructs HypothesisValuet-value p-value Enabling PMS  task performance H 1 0.0101 0.05990.4761 Enabling PMS  psychological empowerment H 2 0.6550 9.02150.0000** Enabling PMS  job satisfaction H 3 0.3145 3.29920.0005** Psychological empowerment  task performance H 4 0.4008 2.54140.0055* Psychological empowerment  job satisfaction H 5 0.4696 4.99980.0000** Enabling PMS  psychological empowerment  task performance H 6a 0.2626 2.49200.0064* Enabling PMS  psychological empowerment  job satisfaction H 6b 0.3076 4.32240.0000** PMS = performance measurement system. *, **: 0.01 and 0.001 signif cant, respectively. Source: Elaborated by the authors. From the results in Table 7, of the seven hypotheses formulated only one did not have values that enabled it to be sustained. T eir possible implications are discussed in the next section. 4.6 Discussion of the Results Hypothesis H 1, which foresees a positive and signif cant relationship between an enabling PMS and task performance, was not supported (p-value > 0.05). T erefore, it cannot be af rmed that a PMS with clear information on goals, objectives, vision, and mission, and that is transparent with respect to the causal relationships between these elements and the actions of employees, both locally and in the overall structure of the company, or that enables problems to be identif ed and solved in an active way, can lead to better task performance. Goal Setting Theory proposes that goals can be considered as consciously proposed intentions, aims, desired results, or performance standards or targets that af ect performance by directing attention to a selection of appropriate strategies, knowledge, and actions (Marginson et al., 2014). T us, an enabling PMS was expected to be able to trigger the processes foreseen by this theory to the point of inf uencing performance. However, the result for H1 corroborates Bandura (1986), for whom the motivation to carry out activities does not only depend on the goals in themselves, but also on the need to obtain a personal sense of satisfaction in relation to them. Hypothesis H 2, which foresees a signif cant and positive relationship between an enabling PMS and psychological empowerment, was supported (p-value < 0.001). It indicates that making a PMS available that is capable of stimulating the interaction between individuals and their environment in a way that promotes the use of their skills and learning, as well as of ering clear information that supports their work, leads to employees reporting greater feelings of intrinsic motivation; that is, they perceive the work environment in a positive way and consider that they have the skills needed to carry out their work and are able to inf uence the results of their organization, they feel they have control over the distribution of their tasks in their routine, and they see their work as being aligned with their personal values. Hall (2008) and Yuliansyah and Khan (2015) observed a positive association between PMS comprehensibility and psychological empowerment. Marginson et al. (2014) found that PMS usage styles, which involve the way of using information and making it available, are positively associated with psychological empowerment. However, Mahama and Cheng (2013) did not f nd any direct positive relationship between any dimension of psychological empowerment and enabling characteristics of the costing system. Just like PMSs, costing systems provide essential R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 208 Impact of an enabling performance measurement system on task performance and job satisfaction information about the activities of employees and an organization, but in the case of the costing system this was only related with psychological empowerment via the intensity of use of the system, which suggests that the understanding of its semantic level varies (DeLone & McLean, 2003), possibly due to the complexity involved in the costing information (Mahama & Cheng, 2013). Hypothesis H 3, which foresees a significant and positive relationship between an enabling PMS and job satisfaction, was supported (p-value < 0.001). It indicates that individuals that have greater access to information about performance, about the ef ects of their work on an organization, and that can rely on the PMS to use their experience and broaden their knowledge, have their individual needs related to the work fulf lled, and thus report higher levels of satisfaction. Kanter (1977) argues that in the absence of the information needed to carry out their tasks individuals might experience negative feelings such as frustration, which would lead to an increase in tension at work and negatively interfere with their satisfaction (Spreitzer, 1995, 2008). Hypothesis H 4, which foresees a significant and positive relationship between psychological empowerment and task performance, was supported (p-value < 0.01). T is result indicates that intrinsic motivation at work, ref ected in the recognition that the employees have the necessary requirements to meet the demands of their task, control over their routine, the ability to contribute with results obtained by their department or organization, and coherence between organizational and personal values, leads them to have positive conducts in their work, with greater persistence, assertiveness, concentration, and resilience, which can result in them obtaining better results in their activities. However, studies that address the relationship between psychological empowerment and performance have shown dif erent results regarding the importance of the dimensions. Mahama and Cheng (2013) observed positive relationships between competence, meaning, self- determination, and manager performance. Hall (2008) identif ed positive impacts only for the meaning dimension on management performance. When investigating operational staf from the services area, Yuliansyah and Khan (2015) observed positive relationships between the competence and self-determination dimensions and performance and negative ones between the impact dimension and performance. Hypothesis H 5, which foresees a significant and positive relationship between psychological empowerment and job satisfaction, was supported (p-value < 0.001). It indicates that job satisfaction is susceptible to inf uence depending on how much individuals feel their beliefs are coherent with the activities they carry out, there is discretion regarding the way of organizing and prioritizing their activities, the demands of the work can be met by their skills and knowledge, and they see the impacts of their actions on the performance of their unit. T omas and Velthouse (1990) state that low levels of meaning are linked to low job satisfaction and feelings of apathy, while high levels of autonomy contribute to satisfaction. Spreitzer (2008) suggests that there is a strong relationship between the meaning dimension and job satisfaction, and to a lesser extent with the competence dimension, and satisfaction is related with the impact dimension by increasing involvement with the work and enabling individuals to perceive their contribution to the results (Bordin et al., 2006). Hypothesis H 6a, which foresees a significant and positive relationship between an enabling PMS mediated by psychological empowerment and task performance, was supported (p-value < 0.01). T is indicates that by providing employees with an enabling PMS that associates the availability of information at all levels of a company with the possibility of actively handling it, understanding its logic, and using it as a support tool to meet their demands, and that favors learning, can make them view their work environment positively. T ey will thus have the elements needed to execute their work adequately and will experience psychological empowerment. Perceiving intrinsic motivation in their work, employees will act more favorably in relation to the demands of their work context in order to obtain better results. Although Liden et al. (2000), Seibert et al. (2004), and Wang and Lee (2009) did not investigate SCG or PMS, their f ndings relate to characteristic elements of these systems, with indication that such elements could occur in a PMS, which is an aspect that is corroborated by this study and which jointly reinforces the elements noted in these studies. Hypothesis H 6b, which foresees a significant and positive relationship between an enabling PMS mediated by psychological empowerment and job satisfaction, was supported (p-value < 0.001). T is result suggests that in interacting with an enabling PMS employees can perceive psychological empowerment; that is, they experience that in the relationship between the individual and the work environment the competence, impact, self-determination, and meaning dimensions are present, which are susceptible to meeting the intrinsic needs of the individual and are associated with higher levels of job satisfaction. T is result corroborates with the finding of Burney and Matherly (2007) that an integrated PMS of ering relevant information for the work is positively associated with R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 209 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren job satisfaction; however, the comprehensibility of the system, that is, its of ering a wide variety of performance indicators, was not revealed as being associated with job satisfaction in the aforementioned study. Burney and Matherly (2007) argue that providing a wide range of indicators would be involved in shaping a holistic vision of an organization’s functioning in order to increase conf dence in decision making. T is justif cation is close to the conception of internal and global transparency that composes the concept of enabling PMS. However, the def nition of internal transparency includes exposure to the logic behind the functioning of the processes and information in an intelligible way, which suggests that it is not enough to make a volume of information available; it needs to be in a format that the individual can understand and associate with the functioning of the system so that the perception of the relevance of this information can trigger the feeling of psychological empowerment and thus be connected with job satisfaction. T is intricate relationship that leads information from a PMS to af ect satisfaction may explain the evidence found in this study, given the absence of any relationship found in the study from Burney and Matherly (2007). T e results of the theoretical-empirical model, when viewed comprehensively, may indicate that even in environments with mechanistic controls, a strict focus on standardization, and documented processes, as occurs in an SSC, it is possible to stimulate psychological empowerment and obtain positive results in task performance and job satisfaction. However, this implies adjusting the PMS in order to enable an understanding of the logic behind its factors and allows the employees to relate to these systems in a way that favors learning and the use of their skills. In their study, considered to be the f rst review of the literature on SSCs, Richter & Bruhl (2017) verif ed that of the 83 articles identif ed there was no use of psychological theories to explain phenomena that occur in these organizations. In general, the studies apply economic, strategy-related, and socio-organizational theories and seek to verify the relationship between governance practices, the level of centralization, and technological dependence, on organizational performance, generally by means of dif erent aspects of the strategic conf guration of these companies (Richter & Bruhl, 2017). T e scenario presented by the research from Richter and Bruhl (2017) denotes the dif culty in contextualizing the f ndings of this study. However, in studies with similar characteristics, such as that of Hechanova, Alampay, and Franco (2006), which investigated the relationship between the psychological empowerment, satisfaction, and performance at work of Asian employees from f ve service sectors (hotel, call center, banking, food, and airline), psychological empowerment was shown to be positively associated with performance and satisfaction. However, the employees from the call canter and airline areas reported lower levels of empowerment and satisfaction compared to the other sectors. T e authors argue that structural characteristics designed to support companies’ business models, such as an orientation towards productivity, following strict norms, distance between employee and client, and possibilities for customization, which are aspects that are also present in an SSC, are relevant for understanding the results. Such evidence reinforces the results of this study by indicating that approaches need to be found that can enable the occurrence of empowerment in these environments, given the positive results of this occurrence. Spreitzer (2008) had already observed that the perception of individuals regarding the elements that compose their work environment is a determinant of their psychological empowerment. In this sense, despite the restriction inherent to an SSC environment, individuals can obtain a positive perception as long as there is stimulation for this, which the evidence of this study indicates as being possible through an enabling PMS. By showing that such relationships are possible in an SSC, it could be suggested that in environments with f uid controls the results would have an even more prominent potential. 5. FINAL REMARKS T e study analyzed the impacts of PMSs with enabling characteristics on task performance and job satisfaction. T e results indicated that the theory of enabling controls applied to a PMS is consistent with psychological empowerment. PMSs are expressive in the organizational context due to their ability to inf uence the behavior of employees and obtain cooperation in order to achieve organizational objectives (Demartini, 2014). T is study suggests that this is due to the perception of psychological empowerment created by conf guring a PMS based on an enabling logic and thus enabling greater integration between PMS and user. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 210 Impact of an enabling performance measurement system on task performance and job satisfaction T e results of this study conf rm the importance of sharing information highlighted in the management practices mentioned by Kanter (1977), which is a key element for empowerment. However, merely allowing employee access to a wide range of information may not be enough (Burney & Matherly, 2007), given that an enabling PMS proposes the sharing of information, however with a focus on intelligibility and exposing its underlying logic, which are elements that place the user of the PMS in an active position with relation to the system. PMSs that support enabling characteristics can also be ef ective in inf uencing employee motivation and performance, as well as positively contributing to job satisfaction. Considering that the attention of managers is limited (Simons, 1992), conf guring an enabling PMS could be an alternative in contexts in which the managers are particularly in demand or are constrained in their actions. Another point that stands out is the context of this study. SSCs are characterized as work environments with detailed and established routines with a high volume of demand (Bergeron, 2003). T ese characteristics are shown to be attributable to mechanistic organizations, but the results enable it to be suggested that even in less organic environments, implementing an enabling PMS can work as an element that is able to bypass the adverse ef ects of the context and stimulate psychological empowerment, producing attitudinal results and positive behaviors. T us, the validation of the model proposed in an SSC indicates that the paradox between simultaneously controlling and allowing f exibility can be addressed via enabling controls (Ahrens & Chapman, 2004). Employing systems and processes that are conf gured using the logic of usability (Adler & Borys, 1996) would result in controls with greater legitimacy and less prominent mechanistic characteristics. However, the conclusions of this study require prudence since it concerns a cross-sectional study carried out in only one organization and contextual or temporal dif erences may lead to dif erent results. Although the theory presents the expected direction of the relationships, cross-sectional studies can identify whether such aspects are conf rmed empirically. Studies with temporal-longitudinal cross sections that evaluate the causality relationships between the variables in this study can contribute to a greater understanding of the model. In addition, operational workers that carry out administrative, accounting, and f nancial activities in an SSC were investigated; therefore, managers or employees that perform activities with other characteristics may present dif erent perceptions. It is recommended that studies on characteristics of PMSs investigate in other operational ways the relationship between enabling controls and psychological empowerment in order to broaden and consolidate the evidence on the topic, since the theory of enabling controls denotes relationships with cognitive and motivational aspects that still require empirical verif cations and have the potential to show other associations between PMSs and positive organizational results. Future studies should consider possible risks of adopting the constructs, such as the possible isolated ef ects of certain dimensions over the results and the occurrence of a trade-of that may be hidden when using second order or one-dimensional variables, with a greater emphasis on the enabling PMS construct, which has characteristics that have barely been explored in a quantitative way in the literature. Another suggestion is that the relationships suggested in this model are analyzed using other methodological designs and statistical techniques in order to increase the validity and reliability of this evidence. REFERENCES Adler, P. S., & Borys, B. (1996). Two types of bureaucracy: enabling and coercive. Administrative Science Quarterly, 41(1), 61-89. Ahrens, T., & Chapman, C. S. (2004). Accounting for f exibility and ef ciency: a f eld study of management control systems in a restaurant chain. Contemporary Accounting Research , 21(2), 271-301. Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action. Englewood, NJ: Prentice Hall. Becker, J., Klein, K., & Wetzels, M. (2012). Hierarchical latent variable models in PLS-SEM: guidelines for using ref ective- formative type models. Long Range Planning , 45(5), 359-394. Bergeron, B. (2003). Essentials of shared services. Hoboken: Wiley. Birnberg, J. G., Luf , J., & Shields, M. D. (2006). Psychology theory in management accounting research. In Hopwoof, A. G., & Chapman, C. S. (Orgs.). Handbook of management accounting research (pp. 111-135). Amsterdam: Elsevier. Bordin, C., Bartram, T., & Casimir, G. (2006). T e antecedents and consequences of psychological empowerment among Singaporean IT employees. Management Research News, 30(1), 34-46. Burney, L. L., & Matherly, M. (2007). Examining performance measurement from an integrated perspective. Journal of Information Systems , 21(2), 49-68. Carroll, S. J., & Schneier, C. E. (1982). Performance appraisal and review systems: the identif cation, measurement, and development of performance in organizations. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman. Chan, Y. H., Nadler, S. S., & Hargis, M. B. (2015). Attitudinal and behavioral outcomes of employees’ psychological R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 211 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren empowerment: a structural equation modeling approach. Journal of Organizational Culture, Communication and Conf ict , 19(1), 24-41. Chenhall, R. H. (2003). Management control systems design within its organizational context: f ndings from contingency- based research and directions for the future. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 28(2), 127-168. Chiang, C. F., & Hsieh, T. S. (2012). T e impacts of perceived organizational support and psychological empowerment on job performance: the mediating ef ects of organizational citizenship behavior. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 31(1), 180-190. Conger, J. A., & Kanungo, R. N. (1988). T e empowerment process: integrating theory and practice. Academy of Management Review, 13(3), 471-482. DeLone, W. H., & McLean, E. R. (2003). T e DeLone and McLean model of information systems success: a ten-year update. Journal of Management Information Systems, 19(4), 9-30. Demartini, C. (2014). Performance management systems. Berlin: Springer. Drake, A. R., Wong, J., & Salter, S. B. (2007). Empowerment, motivation, and performance: examining the impact of feedback and incentives on nonmanagement employees. Behavioral Research in Accounting , 19(1), 71-89. Flamholtz, E. G., Das, T. K., & Tsui, A. S. (1985). Toward an integrative framework of organizational control. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 10(1), 35-50. Fornell, C., & Larcker, D. F. (1981). Structural equation models with unobservable variables and measurement error: algebra and statistics. Journal of Marketing Research , 18(3), 382-388. Franco-Santos, M., Lucianetti, L., & Bourne, M. (2012). Contemporary performance measurement systems: a review of their consequences and a framework for research. Management Accounting Research, 23(2), 79-119. Hair Jr., J. F., Hult, G. T. M., Ringle, C., & Sarstedt, M. (2016). A primer on partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). London: Sage Publication. Hall, M. (2008). T e ef ect of comprehensive performance measurement systems on role clarity, psychological empowerment and managerial performance. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 33(2), 141-163. He, P., Murrmann, S. K., & Perdue, R. R. (2010). An investigation of the relationships among employee empowerment, employee perceived service quality, and employee job satisfaction in a US hospitality organization. Journal of Foodservice Business Research , 13(1), 36-50. Hechanova, M., Alampay, R. B. A., & Franco, E. P. (2006). Psychological empowerment, job satisfaction and performance among Filipino service workers. Asian Journal of Social Psychology , 9(1), 72-78. Holdsworth, L., & Cartwright, S. (2003). Empowerment, stress and satisfaction: an exploratory study of a call centre. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 24(3), 131-140. Ishzaka, A., & Blakiston, R. (2012). T e 18C’s model for a successful long-term outsourcing arrangement. Industrial Marketing Management , 41(7), 1071-1080. Jordan, S., & Messner, M. (2012). Enabling control and the problem of incomplete performance indicators. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 37(8), 544-564. Kanter, R. M. (1977). Men and women of the corporation. New York, NY: Basic Books. Kathuria, R., & Davis, E. B. (2001). Quality and work force management practices: the managerial performance implication. Production and Operations Management, 10(4), 460-477. Kuntz, J., & Roberts, A. (2014). Engagement and identif cation: an investigation of social and organizational predictors in an HR of shoring context. Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal , 7(3), 253-274. Laschinger, H. K. S., Finegan, J. E., Shamian, J., & Wilk, P. (2004). A longitudinal analysis of the impact of workplace empowerment on work satisfaction. Journal of Organizational Behavior , 25(4), 527-545. Laschinger, H. K. S., Finegan, J., Shamian, J., & Wilk, P. (2001). Impact of structural and psychological empowerment on job strain in nursing work settings: expanding Kanter’s model. Journal of Nursing Administration , 31(5), 260-272. Latan, H., Ringle, C. M., & Jabbour, C. J. C. (2016). Whistleblowing intentions among public accountants in Indonesia: testing for the moderation ef ects. Journal of Business Ethics (2016). Retrieved from https://doi. org/10.1007/s10551-016-3318-0. Liden, R. C., Wayne, S. J., & Sparrowe, R. T. (2000). An examination of the mediating role of psychological empowerment on the relations between the job, interpersonal relationships, and work outcomes. Journal of Applied Psychology , 85(3), 407-416. Mahama, H., & Cheng, M. M. (2013). T e ef ect of managers’ enabling perceptions on costing system use, psychological empowerment, and task performance. Behavioral Research in Accounting , 25(1), 89-114. Marginson, D., Mcaulay, L., Roush, M., & Van Zijl, T. (2014). Examining a positive psychological role for performance measures. Management Accounting Research, 25(1), 63-75. Mostafa, A. M. S., & Gould-Williams, J. S. (2014). Testing the mediation ef ect of person–organization f t on the relationship between high performance HR practices and employee outcomes in the Egyptian public sector. T e International Journal of Human Resource Management, 25(2), 276-292. Mundy, J. (2010). Creating dynamic tensions through a balanced use of management control systems. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 35(5), 499-523. Palomino, M. N., & Frezatti, F. (2016). Role conf ict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction: Perceptions of the Brazilian controllers. Revista de Administração , 51(1), 165-181. Peng, D. X., & Lai, F. (2012). Using partial least squares in operations management research: A practical guideline and summary of past research. Journal of Operations Management, 30(6), 467-480. Richter, C. P., & Bruhl, R. (2017). Shared service center research: A review of the past, present, and future. European Management Journal , 35(1), 26-38. Ringle, C. M., Sarstedt, M., & Straub, D. (2012). A critical look at the use of PLS-SEM. MIS Quarterly, 36(1), III-XIV. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 212 Impact of an enabling performance measurement system on task performance and job satisfaction Schulz, V., & Brenner, W. (2010). Characteristics of shared service centers. Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, 4(3), 210-219. Seibert, S. E., Silver, S. R., & Randolph, W. A. (2004). Taking empowerment to the next level: a multiple-level model of empowerment, performance, and satisfaction. Academy of Management Journal, 47(3), 332-349. Seibert, S. E., Wang, G., & Courtright, S. H. (2011). Antecedents and consequences of psychological and team empowerment in organizations: a meta-analytic review. Journal of Applied Psychology , 96(5), 981-1003. Simons, R. (1992). T e role of management control systems in creating competitive advantage: new perspectives. In Emmanuel, C., Otley, D., & Merchant, K. (Eds.). T e role of management control systems in creating competitive advantage: new perspectives (pp. 622-645). New York, NY: Springer. Spreitzer, G. M. (1995). Psychological empowerment in the workplace: dimensions, measurement, and validation. Academy of Management Journal, 38(5), 1442-1465. Spreitzer, G. M. (2008). Taking stock: a review of more than twenty years of research on empowerment at work. In Cooper, C., & Barlin J. (Orgs.). Handbook of organizational behavior (pp. 54-73). T ousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Spreitzer, G. M., Kizilos, M. A., & Nason, S. W. (1997). A dimensional analysis of the relationship between psychological empowerment and ef ectiveness satisfaction, and strain. Journal of Management, 23(5), 679-704. Tarrant, T., & Sabo, C. E. (2010). Role conf ict, role ambiguity, and job satisfaction in nurse executives. Nursing Administration Quarterly , 34(1), 72-82. T omas, K. W., & Velthouse, B. A. (1990). Cognitive elements of empowerment: an “interpretive” model of intrinsic task motivation. Academy of Management Review, 15(4), 666-681. Van Der Hauwaert, E., & Bruggeman, W. (2015). T e ef ect of monetary rewards on autonomous motivation in an enabling performance measurement context. Corporate Ownership & Control , 12(3), 341-356. Wang, G., & Lee, P. D. (2009). Psychological empowerment and job satisfaction: an analysis of interactive ef ects. Group & Organization Management, 34(3), 271-296. Widener, S. K. (2014). Researching the human side of management control: using survey-based methods. In Otley, D. T., & Soin, K. (Eds.). Management control and uncertainty (pp. 69-82). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Wouters, M., & Wilderom, C. (2008). Developing performance- measurement systems as enabling formalization: a longitudinal f eld study of a logistics department. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 33(4), 488-516. Wouters, M., & Roijmans, D. (2011). Using prototypes to induce experimentation and knowledge integration in the development of enabling accounting information. Contemporary Accounting Research , 28(2), 708-736. Yuliansyah, Y., & Khan, A. A. (2015). Strategic performance measurement system: a service sector and lower level employees empirical investigation. Corporate Ownership & Control , 12(3), 304-316. ISSN 1808-057X R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018194DOI: 10.1590/1808-057x201805850A O Ref exos do sistema de mensuração de desempenho habilitante na performance de tarefas e satisfação no trabalhoGuilherme Eduardo de SouzaUniversidade Federal da Integração Latino-Americana, Foz do Iguaçu, PR, Brasil E-mail: [email protected] Maria BeurenUniversidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Contabilidade, Florianópolis, SC, Brasil E-mail: [email protected] em 19.05.2017 – Desk aceite em 31.07.2017 – 2ª versão aprovada em 01.01.2018RESUMOEste estudo analisa os ref exos do sistema de mensuração de desempenho (performance measurement system – PMS) com características habilitantes no desempenho de tarefas e satisfação no trabalho mediado pelo empowerment psicológico em um Centro de Serviços Compartilhados (CSC). A literatura sobre controles gerenciais vem buscando identif car elementos capazes de melhorar o desempenho, e os controles habilitantes associados ao empowerment psicológico podem trazer novos indícios nessa discussão. Dada a capacidade do contexto em afetar a percepção dos indivíduos, é relevante compreender os impactos dos controles na satisfação, o que pode levar a práticas mais alinhadas às suas expectativas e resultados favoráveis à organização. Os resultados do estudo apontam que as características do PMS afetam a motivação dos indivíduos, de modo que implementar sistemas com características habilitantes pode contribuir para a percepção dos funcionários sobre seu controle e autonomia no trabalho. Na estrutura mecanicista do CSC, a forma como os PMS são conformados pode contornar possíveis resultados adversos provenientes de estruturas pouco orgânicas na percepção de empowerment psicológico dos funcionários. Uma survey foi realizada em um CSC, localizado na Região Sul do Brasil, que oferece serviços administrativos, f nanceiros e contábeis. Obteve-se a participação de 88 dentre os 125 funcionários operacionais, o equivalente a 70% do total. O instrumento de pesquisa utilizado foi baseado em assertivas dos estudos de Mahama e Cheng (2013), Spreitzer (1995), Tarrant e Sabo (2010) e Van Der Hauwaert e Bruggeman (2015). Para testar as hipóteses, aplicou-se a modelagem de equações estruturais. Evidências obtidas na pesquisa indicam que o uso do PMS habilitante pode contribuir para o equilíbrio necessário nas empresas entre níveis de controles formais e empowerment psicológico, para obter satisfação no trabalho e desempenho nas tarefas de funcionários.Palavras-chave: PMS habilitante, desempenho de tarefas, satisfação no trabalho, empowerment psicológico, Centro de Serviços Compartilhados.Endereço para correspondência: Ilse Maria Beuren Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Contabilidade Campus Universitário Reitor João David Ferreira Lima – CEP 88040-900 Trindade – Florianópolis – SC – Brasil R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 195 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren 1. INTRODUÇÃO Os sistemas de controle gerencial (SCGs), que se compõem de sistemas de contabilidade gerencial, planejamento, orçamento, gerenciamento de projetos, informações e relatórios e mensuração de desempenho (Simons, 1992), visam a inf uenciar o comportamento e a obter a cooperação de grupos de indivíduos ou unidades em direção aos objetivos da organização (Flamholtz, Das & Tsui, 1985). De acordo com Widener (2014), fatores relacionados ao comportamento humano são a principal explicação para a variância no desempenho das organizações. Nesse sentido, os sistemas de mensuração de desempenho (performance measurement systems – PMS) são instrumentos de suporte que oferecem uma visão ampla dos processos principais e dos níveis de atingimento dos objetivos da organização (Franco-Santos, Lucianetti & Bourne, 2012). Esses sistemas permitem o desdobramento da estratégia para toda a empresa, ao comunicarem os fatores considerados principais, além de instituir medidas para seu atingimento, desde as áreas operacionais, como atendimento ao cliente, vendas e manufatura, passando por níveis gerenciais e culminando na alta gestão (Demartini, 2014). Além disso, estudos que abordam elementos do PMS destacam que características do trabalho, como oferecer feedback (Liden, Wayne & Sparrowe, 2000) e práticas gerenciais que envolvam compartilhamento de informações, responsabilidade e accountability (Seibert, Silver & Randolph, 2004), podem afetar a satisfação dos indivíduos no trabalho. No entanto, adequar esse sistema às necessidades da organização e dos indivíduos enseja cuidados com seu desenho, implementação, uso e abrangência (Chenhall, 2003; Hall, 2008). Devido à sua complexidade, os PMS têm sido estudados a partir de diversas abordagens, pautados em teorias econômicas, sociológicas, psicológicas ou combinações entre elas, na tentativa de elucidar os mecanismos subjacentes a esses sistemas (Franco-Santos et al. 2012). A abordagem psicológica permite entender os PMS a partir do indivíduo (Birnberg, Luf & Shields, 2006). Tal abordagem é relevante ao considerar que o desempenho da empresa começa no nível individual (Mahama & Cheng, 2013). Soma-se a isso o fato de que a estrutura e os processos da empresa podem moldar as ações dos empregados. Nesse sentido, práticas de contabilidade gerencial presentes nos PMS podem inf uenciar representações mentais dos indivíduos devido ao estabelecimento de metas, mudanças de pontos de referência e alterações nas crenças. A introdução de exigências leva a tensões, inconsistências e conf itos capazes de afetar os esforços dos indivíduos, o que pode gerar motivação, conduzindo o indivíduo em direção às metas e objetivos ou desmotivação, resultando em insatisfação, diminuição da autoestima e confiança interpessoal e perda do senso de controle (Adler & Borys, 1996; Birnberg et al., 2006). Os PMS englobam elementos informacionais, de feedback , de feedforward e de recompensas (Demartini, 2014), que são suscetíveis de afetar o empowerment psicológico e favorecer o desempenho no nível individual de análise, como o desempenho gerencial (Hall, 2008; Marginson, Mcaulay, Roush & Van Zijl, 2014) e de tarefas (Mahama & Cheng, 2013). No entanto, estudos para identif car os mecanismos pelos quais características do PMS inf uenciam a percepção dos empregados sobre o ambiente de trabalho, sua motivação e, consequentemente, seu comportamento e atitudes geralmente têm investigado características isoladas de práticas contábeis, como o fornecimento de feedback , acesso a informações, características de metas e visibilidade dos processos (Birnberg et al., 2006; Franco-Santos et al., 2012; Liden et al., 2000; Seibert et al., 2004). Poucos estudos analisaram tais aspectos em conjunto, pautados no PMS, como Hall (2008), ao tratar da compreensibilidade desses sistemas, e Marginson et al. (2014), ao analisar os efeitos do uso de medidas f nanceiras e não f nanceiras. A lógica subjacente ao empowerment psicológico surge da ideia de senso de controle dos indivíduos sobre seu ambiente de trabalho (Spreitzer, 2008). O empowerment psicológico pode levar a resultados positivos ao permitir que os empregados tenham maior envolvimento, controle e autonomia em suas atividades, que se manifestam pela percepção conjunta do indivíduo dos sentimentos de signif cado, impacto, competência e autodeterminação em seu ambiente laboral (Spreitzer, 2008). O empowerment aparentemente sinaliza um conflito com a ideia de controle gerencial. Coexiste nas empresas a necessidade de os funcionários serem f exíveis para se adaptar às mudanças, ao mesmo tempo em que necessitam aplicar controles gerenciais em seus processos para assegurar o uso ef ciente dos recursos e acompanhar seus resultados (Ahrens & Chapman, 2004; Simons, 1992). Se por um lado a percepção em incentivar maior autonomia no trabalho leva a resultados favoráveis, que vão desde melhorar a motivação até elevar a capacidade de resposta dos empregados e, por consequência, da empresa (Spreitzer, 2008), por outro lado os controles gerenciais são necessários para a ef ciência dos processos. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 196 Reflexos do sistema de mensuração de desempenho habilitante na performance de tarefas e satisfa ção no trabalho Nesse contexto, como forma de distinguir entre as regras boas e más presentes nos processos de gestão, e consequentemente ref etidas nos controles gerenciais e nos diferentes resultados advindos de sua aplicação, Ahrens e Chapman (2004), fundamentados na Teoria da Formalização Burocrática de Adler e Borys (1996), aduzem que os sistemas formais de controle podem ter características habilitantes (enabling) ou coercitivas (coersive ). Assim, os processos organizacionais podem ser desenhados (i) de forma habilitante, ao permitir que os funcionários tenham maior responsabilidade e autonomia, ou (ii) de forma coercitiva, ao desenhar processos rígidos e pouco interativos. Tais elementos, quando aplicados aos controles gerenciais, sugerem que controles habilitantes podem favorecer maior integração do empregado com suas atividades no trabalho, enquanto que os controles coercitivos vão em direção oposta (Ahrens & Chapman, 2004). Os controles coercitivos e habilitantes são alternativa de análise para explicar o uso de controles em níveis distintos da empresa, de modo que ela consiga executar a estratégia de diminuir os custos de produção e ser mais f exível simultaneamente (Ahrens & Chapman, 2004). No entanto, para avaliar essas relações, é necessário atentar-se ao contexto do estudo, no caso desta pesquisa, um Centro de Serviços Compartilhados (CSC). Kuntz e Roberts (2014) afirmam que as organizações vêm realocando suas atividades de suporte em subsidiárias no exterior a f m de obter os benefícios da economia de escala e das condições favoráveis do mercado de trabalho de outros países. Um exemplo disso são os CSC, estruturas que concentram as atividades administrativas de suporte da organização, reduzindo a duplicidade de departamentos e oferecendo ef ciência ao processar grande volume de transações com custos reduzidos (Schulz & Brenner, 2010). Todavia, estudos recentes sugerem que essas realocações podem ocasionar efeitos adversos na integração, por exemplo, no controle e qualidade das relações entre gestores e matriz, ref etindo-se em aspectos motivacionais e atitudinais (Ishzaka & Blakiston, 2012). Esses estudos têm abordado o problema pela ótica dos custos relacionados às decisões de realocação e do desempenho organizacional dessas decisões, desconsiderando efeitos adversos, seus impactos no indivíduo, bem como o uso de abordagens psicológicas para compreender seus efeitos (Kuntz & Roberts, 2014; Richter & Bruhl, 2017). Assim, tem-se a seguinte pergunta de pesquisa: quais os ref exos do sistema de avaliação de desempenho habilitante no desempenho de tarefas e satisfação no trabalho, por meio do empowerment psicológico, em um CSC? Este estudo objetiva analisar os ref exos do PMS com características habilitantes no desempenho de tarefas e satisfação no trabalho, mediado pelo empowerment psicológico, em um CSC. Os estudos sobre empowerment psicológico têm dado atenção aos níveis gerenciais das empresas (Yuliansyah & Khan, 2015). Spreitzer (1995), ao elencar os antecedentes e consequentes associados ao empowerment, apontou a necessidade de conf rmar as relações também no nível operacional (lower-level employees ). Porém, o número de estudos para esse nível de análise é reduzido (Yuliansyah & Khan, 2015). Cabe ainda verif car como essas relações estruturam-se em empresas prestadoras de serviços e em diferentes desenhos organizacionais (Chenhall, 2003). Uma forma diferente de organizar as operações da empresa são os CSC (Bergeron, 2003), foco deste estudo, em que a hipótese principal é que o PMS habilitante mediado pelo empowerment psicológico associa-se positivamente ao desempenho de tarefas e satisfação no trabalho de indivíduos de nível operacional. O propósito é contribuir com evidências de que o uso do PMS habilitante favorece o equilíbrio necessário entre níveis de controles formais e empowerment psicológico no desempenho das tarefas. A estrutura de CSC pode trazer novas evidências para a discussão sobre o empowerment psicológico, por se tratar de unidades descentralizadas na hierarquia da organização, porém altamente dependentes de recursos de outras unidades, o que enseja pouca autonomia (Bergeron, 2003). Os CSC são orientados para a busca de alta ef ciência operacional, por meio de processos padronizados e níveis de serviço pré-acordados com as áreas da organização que transferiram suas atividades administrativas para o CSC. Portanto, o uso de manuais de trabalho pormenorizados é recorrente (Bergeron, 2003), o que pode interferir no senso de controle dos indivíduos e no PMS, além de se ref etir no desempenho de tarefas e na satisfação no trabalho. 2. REFERENCIAL TEÓRICO No ambiente de trabalho, o empowerment tem duas perspectivas distintas: (i) socioestrutural, que aborda os fatores contextuais que possibilitam o surgimento do empowerment, como práticas, políticas e estruturas, e (ii) psicológica, voltada para as percepções de empowerment dos indivíduos perante as práticas, políticas e estruturas que o cercam (Spreitzer, 2008). Nesse sentido, é possível def nir o empowerment psicológico como um estado R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 197 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren psicológico experimentado pelos indivíduos que indica o sucesso das condições estruturais do empowerment. O empowerment está relacionado com o acesso dos indivíduos às ferramentas de poder de Kanter (1977), def nidas como oportunidades, recursos, informação e apoio (Spreitzer, 2008). Nessa perspectiva, poder signif ca ter controle sobre os recursos organizacionais e a possibilidade de o indivíduo tomar decisões que sejam relevantes para seu papel ou trabalho (Spreitzer, 2008). Por essa ótica, o PMS pode ser compreendido como elemento de empowerment socioestrutural, uma vez que se trata de uma prática de gestão que envolve decisões sobre uso e controle de recursos, estabelecimento de metas, mudanças de pontos de referência, informações de feedback , feedforward , aspectos de tarefas, entre outros (Birnberg et al., 2006; Franco-Santos et al., 2012), que frequentemente estão relacionados a oportunidades, recursos, informação e apoio. Essa relação entre PMS e empowerment psicológico poderia ser estimulada com o uso de PMS habilitantes, os quais podem ser compreendidos como aqueles que permitem aos usuários maior interação, aprendizado, uso de habilidades e compreensão de sua lógica por meio das características de reparo, f exibilidade, transparência interna e transparência global (Van Der Hauwaert & Bruggeman, 2015). Para estimular o empowerment, as organizações podem alterar sua estrutura, processos, políticas e práticas de modo que incentivem o uso de sistemas de alto envolvimento, o que inclui tomada de decisão participativa, sistemas de desempenho baseados no conhecimento e habilidades e sistemas de informação de fluxo aberto como forma de ampliar o acesso às oportunidades, informações, suporte e recursos entre todos os níveis hierárquicos (Spreitzer, 2008). Birnberg et al. (2006) evidenciam que os estudos psicológicos sobre práticas contábeis têm indicado que elementos informacionais e motivacionais decorrentes de tais práticas podem inf uenciar na maneira como os indivíduos regulam seus esforços e processam as informações, de forma que isso se ref ete em seus níveis de desempenho e satisfação. Assim, sugere-se que o PMS habilitante pode associar-se positivamente com satisfação no trabalho e desempenho de tarefas por meio do empowerment psicológico. Decorre que ambos os efeitos, motivacionais e informacionais, podem ocorrer no âmbito de tais sistemas, pois estimulam processos subjetivos e inf uenciam o comportamento dos indivíduos por meio de mecanismos cognitivos, motivacionais e sociais em decorrência do uso de informações para atividades de monitoramento, mensuração e avaliação de desempenho, como apontam os estudos de Hall (2008) e Marginson et al. (2014), e, ainda, possibilitam maior envolvimento dos indivíduos com os mecanismos de poder de Kanter (1977). 2.1 PMS Habilitante e Desempenho de Tarefas O PMS caracteriza-se como um controle organizacional formal (Simons, 1992) com uma gama de indicadores, financeiros e não-financeiros, informacionais e de avaliação, conectados por uma relação causal entre indicadores e objetivos, moldados de acordo com o contexto e utilizados para aferir o desempenho da empresa em todos os seus níveis, além de possibilitar o aprendizado e o desenvolvimento dos indivíduos (Franco-Santos et al., 2012). O controle fundamenta-se em duas preocupações principais: (i) o design do sistema informacional e de accountability, ou seja, as operating rules, que se referem às atividades que os indivíduos desempenham na organização, e (ii) o comportamento ou enforcement rules, que devem motivar o indivíduo rumo aos objetivos organizacionais (Demartini, 2014). Nesse sentido, o conceito de formalização burocrática (Adler & Borys, 1996) sugere que, assim como no desenho de sistemas e máquinas, o desenho dos processos organizacionais também pode ser caracterizado tanto pela lógica fool-proof ng ou à prova de leigos quanto pela lógica da usabilidade. Adler e Borys (1996) sugeriram uma reanálise da burocracia a partir da preocupação com o tipo de burocracia instituída nas empresas. Assim, os autores resgatam as dimensões que compõem um sistema para o usuário e as aplicam na área organizacional para explicar as características habilitantes, como apresentado na Tabela 1. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 198 Reflexos do sistema de mensuração de desempenho habilitante na performance de tarefas e satisfa ção no trabalho Tabela 1 Dimensões de sistemas habilitantes Dimensões Descrição Reparo É a facilidade de um sistema ser reparado. Essa característica permite que o próprio usuário repare o processo ao invés de ter seu trabalho interrompido diante de uma falha ou impasse. Transparência interna A lógica de funcionamento interno e informações sobre o status do sistema estão disponíveis e são apresentadas de forma inteligível para o usuário, que pode corrigir erros. Transparência global Refere-se à inteligibilidade do sistema. É a capacidade de o siste ma fornecer aos usuários vasta gama de informações sobre o estado de todo o processo de produção. Flexibilidade Oferece informações e sugere opções para que o usuário decida. Sistemas f exíveis permitem que o usuário modif que a interface e adicione funcionalidades para atender às demandas específ cas. Fonte: Adaptado de Adler e Borys (1996). Os processos que seguem a lógica da usabilidade são categorizados como formalização habilitante e têm as quatro características apontadas na Tabela 1. Estes são desenhados de modo que o funcionário seja capaz de lidar com as contingências de seu trabalho ao estimular a resolução de problemas por meio de suas habilidades e inteligência, com processos mais abertos e exposição de sua lógica subjacente, em uma relação que possibilita o desenvolvimento do aprendizado (Adler & Borys, 1996). Nessa lógica, problemas são inevitáveis e é desejável oferecer mecanismos que suportem sua resolução ao invés de empreender esforços na elaboração de processos à prova de erros (Adler & Borys, 1996). Em contrapartida, os processos desenhados pela lógica fool-proof ng são tipif cados como formalização coercitiva, com foco no cumprimento de regras e procedimentos, e visam a obter o esforço dos empregados pela imposição das normas e do monitoramento de suas atividades. Os funcionários são vistos como possível fonte de problemas, portanto, os processos visam a mitigar a possibilidade de sua ocorrência (Adler & Borys, 1996). Um PMS com características habilitantes permite ao usuário observar a relação de causa e efeito de suas atividades tanto nos processos locais como no resultado global da empresa, oportuniza a customização de indicadores para situações específ cas, além de corrigir processos que tenham apresentado problemas. Tais aspectos aumentam a possibilidade de aprendizado, pois estimulam a compreensão do usuário acerca da lógica do processo e oferece informações sobre o nível de atingimento das metas, o que pode elevar seu desempenho de tarefas (Hall, 2008; Mahama & Cheng, 2013). Nesse sentido, formulou-se a primeira hipótese: H1: o PMS habilitante associa-se positivamente ao desempenho de tarefas. 2.2 PMS Habilitante e Empowerment Psicológico T omas e Velthouse (1990), a partir das ideias de Conger e Kanungo (1988), elaboraram um framework que def ne o empowerment psicológico como a motivação intrínseca de tarefas manifestada por meio de quatro cognições ou estados mentais que conformam a orientação do indivíduo em face de seu papel no trabalho, as quais são suscetíveis de inf uência pelo ambiente laboral. Spreitzer (2008) destaca que, para que o indivíduo experimente o sentimento de empowerment psicológico, é necessário que as quatro dimensões expostas na Tabela 2 se manifestem, caso contrário, seus efeitos serão limitados. Tabela 2 Dimensões do empowerment psicológico Dimensão Descrição Signif cado Implica a congruência entre os requisitos do trabalho e as crenças, valores e comportamentos individuais. Competência Refere-se ao nível de autoef cácia do indivíduo diante de seu trabalho. Trata-se da crença nas capacidades individuais para desenvolver as atividades do trabalho adequadamente. Autodeterminação Diz respeito aos sentimentos de escolha e controle do indivíduo sobre seu trabalho e se ref ete na autonomia para decidir acerca dos métodos, esforço e ritmo de suas atividades. Impacto Corresponde à crença do indivíduo sobre sua capacidade de inf uenciar questões importantes na organização, como seus resultados. Fonte: Adaptado de Spreitzer (1995, 2008). R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 199 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren Como já destacado, o PMS habilitante tangencia fatores contextuais presentes nas práticas que caracterizam o empowerment socioestrutural, por exemplo, a necessidade de um sistema com lógica aberta, incentivo ao envolvimento e acesso a informações e oportunidades. Nesse sentido, os controles habilitantes oferecem maior interação entre o sistema e seu usuário, pois permitem que este faça correções e adequações, instituem a necessidade de oferecer transparência, tanto no nível individual quanto nos impactos gerais de sua atividade, e oferecem f exibilidade ao desenhar um sistema que dê suporte ao usuário (Adler & Borys, 1996). Por sua vez, o empowerment psicológico decorre de condições em que os funcionários sentem que seu trabalho tem signif cado, existem condições para que eles executem adequadamente suas atividades, há autonomia para que decidam o que e como fazer e sentem que conseguem impactar seu ambiente de trabalho (Spreitzer, 2008). Os aspectos apontados oferecem indícios de que há consonância entre ambos, visto que as características de um sistema habilitante estão alinhadas com os sentimentos que integram o conceito de empowerment psicológico. Além disso, de acordo com Hall (2008), características do PMS que ampliam sua capacidade de oferecer informações relevantes podem impactar positivamente e reforçar as quatro dimensões do empowerment psicológico, pois aumentam a capacidade de iniciativa do indivíduo, proporcionam maior conhecimento sobre o desempenho e as capacidades necessárias para a realização das tarefas e fazem com que os indivíduos sintam-se valorizados. Considerando que o PMS habilitante tem, entre suas prerrogativas, ampliar o envolvimento do indivíduo, além do acesso a informações consideradas relevantes, formulou-se a segunda hipótese de pesquisa: H2: o PMS habilitante associa-se positivamente ao empowerment psicológico. 2.3 PMS Habilitante e Satisfação no Trabalho A relação entre PMS e satisfação no trabalho tem sido explicada por meio de variáveis mediadoras, por exemplo, conf ança no supervisor e justiça nos procedimentos de avaliação (Franco-Santos et al., 2012). No entanto, argumenta-se no estudo que pode haver elementos no PMS habilitante com similaridades a outros conceitos que envolvem a disseminação de informações, o estímulo ao uso de habilidade e o aprendizado, capazes de justif car uma possível associação direta entre PMS habilitante e satisfação no trabalho. Por exemplo, o empowerment estrutural, normalmente empregado em pesquisas sob a rubrica de práticas de alto envolvimento e as práticas de recursos humanos de alto desempenho (high performance human resource practices – HPHRP). O aumento do empowerment estrutural percebido pelos funcionários se daria por meio do acesso a informações, recursos necessários para realizar seu trabalho, suporte, oportunidades de aprendizado e crescimento (Laschinger, Finegan, Shamian, & Wilk, 2001). Em contrapartida, o PMS habilitante estimula a disseminação de informações e a ocorrência de feedback , identif cação de problemas e sua solução pela capacidade do funcionário, identif cação de oportunidades de aprendizado e ajuda na priorização de ações, e com isso proporciona aos funcionários mecanismos para realizar melhor o seu trabalho e conformar um ambiente propício ao seu desenvolvimento (Wouter & Wilderon, 2008). Laschinger, Finegan, Shamian e Wilk (2004) verif caram que elementos do empowerment estrutural relacionam- se diretamente com a satisfação no trabalho, tais como: adquirir novas habilidades e utilizar suas habilidades para realizar tarefas (oportunidade); ter acesso a informação sobre o status das atividades, conhecer os objetivos e valores da organização (informação); obter feedback de desempenho e auxílio na resolução de problemas (suporte); e ter tempo para demandas do trabalho e obter ajuda temporária quando necessário (recursos). Isso sugere que os indivíduos expostos a melhores condições estruturais, com mais acesso ao apoio e recursos necessários para desempenhar suas atividades, teriam maior satisfação no trabalho (Laschinger et al., 2004). Kanter (1977) aduz que indivíduos que não têm acesso a recursos, informação, suporte e oportunidade vivenciam sentimentos de impotência que impedem a percepção de empowerment psicológico. Isso pode levá- los a sentimentos de frustração e falha, uma vez que se sentem estagnados em seu trabalho e sem mobilidade (Spreitzer, 2008). O uso de um PMS habilitante pode fazer com que os empregados sintam que têm os recursos e o apoio necessários para desempenhar suas tarefas e com isso obter satisfação no trabalho, já que esse PMS potencialmente possibilita o acesso aos elementos citados por Kanter (1977) e Laschinger et al. (2004), como acesso a informações, suporte e aprendizado. Além disso, estudos que abordam elementos de HPHRP têm encontrado associações positivas com a satisfação no trabalho. Os HPHRP constituem-se em práticas de gestão de recursos humanos desenhadas para promover o bem- estar e comprometimento dos empregados (Mostafa & Gould-Willians, 2014). Embora não haja concordância sobre quais práticas se constituem no HPHRP, considera- se que visam a promover a habilidade dos funcionários, comunicação, oportunidade e motivação (Mostafa & R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 200 Reflexos do sistema de mensuração de desempenho habilitante na performance de tarefas e satisfa ção no trabalho Gould-Willians, 2014), aspectos que guardam similaridade com o PMS habilitante. O PMS comumente está associado a políticas de pagamento por desempenho e ao desenvolvimento de carreiras, logo, um sistema que permita ao usuário compreender como se dá a lógica de sua avaliação, possibilite seu uso como meio de suporte às suas atividades e abra espaço para o aprendizado pode trazer resultados positivos em aspectos atitudinais e comportamentais (Wouters & Roijimans, 2011). Assim, formulou-se a terceira hipótese: H3: o PMS habilitante associa-se positivamente à satisfação no trabalho. 2.4 Empowerment Psicológico e Desempenho de Tarefas Estudos têm observado que o empowerment psicológico está positivamente relacionado à efetividade gerencial (Spreitzer, 1995), efetividade dos empregados (Spreitzer, Kizilos & Nason, 1997) e desempenho de tarefas (Mahama & Cheng, 2013). Liden et al. (2000) verif caram que, em uma amostra de funcionários da base da hierarquia de uma empresa de serviços dos Estados Unidos da América, a dimensão de competência do empowerment psicológico estava associada positiva e signif cativamente ao desempenho no trabalho. Hall (2008), em uma amostra de gestores australianos de unidades de manufatura, verif cou que a dimensão signif cado estava associada ao desempenho. Marginson et al. (2014) observaram haver relação positiva signif cante entre desempenho de medidas não f nanceiras e as dimensões competência, signif cado e autodeterminação do empowerment psicológico em uma amostra de gestores de uma empresa multinacional de telecomunicações. Pesquisas sobre este tema têm observado que o desempenho de tarefas decorre de características diferentes em cada uma das quatro dimensões do empowerment psicológico: (i) competência relaciona-se ao maior esforço, altas expectativas de metas e persistência em situações desaf adoras; (ii) signif cado relaciona-se ao alto comprometimento e concentração de energia na tarefa; (iii) autodeterminação relaciona-se ao aprendizado, interesse na atividade e resiliência; e (iv) impacto relaciona-se ao enfrentamento de situações difíceis e alto desempenho das tarefas (Mahama & Cheng, 2013; Spreitzer, 1995). O empowerment psicológico como construto único foi investigado por Chiang e Hsieh (2012) que verif caram associação positiva e signif cante com o desempenho de funcionários de hotéis de Taiwan. Esses autores argumentam que o empowerment psicológico leva os indivíduos a conf ar em sua capacidade de atender às demandas laborais e ter menos dúvidas sobre si e seu trabalho, o que resulta em melhor desempenho. Laschinger et al. (2004) explicam que indivíduos com percepção de empowerment psicológico reagem diante das adversidades de seu trabalho, demonstram persistência e engenhosidade para superar obstáculos, buscam inf uenciar os objetivos e procedimentos operacionais que possam melhorar a qualidade dos resultados, antecipam problemas e reagem melhor aos riscos e incertezas do ambiente. O empowerment psicológico pode ainda aumentar a resiliência, iniciativa e concentração, além de desencadear a percepção de que o indivíduo é capaz de inf uenciar o seu trabalho, levando ao comportamento proativo perante suas atividades, o que se traduz em desempenho efetivo de tarefas (Mahama & Cheng, 2013; Spreitzer, 1995, 2008). Nessa perspectiva, elaborou-se a quarta hipótese da pesquisa: H4: o empowerment psicológico associa-se positivamente ao desempenho de tarefas. 2.5 Empowerment Psicológico e Satisfação no Trabalho Bordin, Bartram e Casimir (2006) argumentam que todas as dimensões do empowerment psicológico são suscetíveis de impactar positivamente a satisfação no trabalho. O impacto aumenta o envolvimento com o trabalho, uma vez que o indivíduo consegue visualizar os efeitos de suas ações nos resultados organizacionais (Bordin et al., 2006), a autodeterminação permite maior controle sobre sua rotina (Spreitzer, 2008), a competência indica que o indivíduo tem a habilidade e o conhecimento necessários para executar suas atividades, o que permite abordá-las de forma adequada e assertiva (Bordin et al., 2006), e o signif cado indica que o empregado dedica-se ao atingimento de objetivos que estão alinhados com seus valores (Spreitzer, 2008). Holdsworth e Cartwright (2003) pesquisaram funcionários de um call center de uma empresa inglesa e observaram que as dimensões de impacto e autodeterminação estão positivamente relacionadas com satisfação no trabalho. Liden et al. (2000) verif caram que, para funcionários da base da hierarquia de uma grande empresa de serviços norte-americana, a dimensão signif cado mostrou-se positivamente associada com a satisfação no trabalho. He, Murrmann e Perdue (2010), ao operacionalizar o empowerment psicológico em um construto único, verif caram que, dentre funcionários de uma organização de serviços hoteleiros norte-americana, os com maior empowerment psicológico reportaram maior satisfação no trabalho. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 201 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren Liden et al. (2000), ao avaliarem a influência do empowerment no ambiente laboral, argumentaram que ele se ref ete na percepção de satisfação no trabalho quando as pessoas: (i) estão envolvidas em atividades laborais que têm signif cado; (ii) têm senso de controle sobre seu trabalho; (iii) envolvem-se nos processos de tomada de decisão; e (iv) sentem-se habilitadas para executar suas funções. Wang e Lee (2009) argumentam que características do trabalho que promovam sentimentos de empowerment psicológico podem proporcionar estados emocionais capazes de inf uenciar a satisfação. Maiores níveis de satisfação no trabalho, no que tange à carreira, recompensas, relacionamento entre pares e superiores e natureza do trabalho, têm sido apontados por empregados que sentem que: (i) seu trabalho tem signif cado para eles; (ii) têm as habilidades necessárias para desempenhar suas atividades; (iii) podem fazer escolhas relativas à sua rotina de trabalho; e (iv) reconhecem os ref exos de suas ações na organização (Spreitzer, 2008). Tal associação ocorre, pois indivíduos que experimentam o empowerment psicológico percebem o preenchimento de suas necessidades de forma mais intrínseca (Seibert, Wang & Cortright, 2011). Assim, tem-se a quinta hipótese da pesquisa: H5: o empowerment psicológico associa-se positivamente à satisfação no trabalho. 2.6 PMS Habilitante, Empowerment Psicológico e Desempenho de Tarefas Drake, Wong e Salter (2007) analisaram elementos do PMS relacionados ao empowerment psicológico e desempenho, com o intuito de compreender os efeitos conjuntos de dois elementos do PMS em funcionários de nível operacional: feedback e esquemas de remuneração. Evidências do estudo indicaram que o feedback afeta o desempenho por meio da dimensão de impacto do empowerment psicológico e esquemas de remuneração baseados no lucro podem inf uenciar negativamente as dimensões de competência e autodeterminação. Quanto às características habilitantes, Mahama e Cheng (2013) verif caram a relação entre sistemas habilitantes e empowerment psicológico restrito ao sistema de custeio habilitante. Apesar de não terem encontrado associação direta entre esses construtos, constaram que sua associação pode ocorrer indiretamente pela intensidade de uso do sistema. Hall (2008) investigou o papel do empowerment psicológico e da clareza de papéis na relação entre a compreensibilidade do PMS e desempenho. Inferiu que a compreensibilidade das características informacionais do PMS podem inf uenciar o desempenho de gestores, mas inf uência no desempenho apenas foi constatada pela dimensão signif cado do empowerment. Yuliansyah e Khan (2015) replicaram o modelo de Hall (2008), mudando o contexto de gestores de indústrias australianas para empregados de nível operacional da área de serviços f nanceiros da Indonésia. Além da dimensão signif cado, as dimensões de competência e autodeterminação contribuíram com a relação entre PMS e desempenho, o que reforça os ref exos do contexto nas investigações sobre empowerment psicológico. Seibert et al. (2004) observaram que os impactos das práticas gerenciais relativas ao compartilhamento de informações, autonomia para explorar limites, responsabilidade e accountability de equipes no desempenho e satisfação no trabalho dependem da percepção dos funcionários sobre essas práticas, o que implica investigar formas para inf uenciar o aspecto psicológico das práticas organizacionais. Portanto, o PMS habilitante pode influenciar o desempenho de tarefas por meio do empowerment psicológico, pois estudos têm apontado relação entre práticas de gestão que estimulam o compartilhamento de informações, descentralização, formação e feedback , com aumento de controle, conhecimento, habilidade e motivação dos empregados, possibilitando melhores resultados comportamentais, como desempenho de tarefas e atingimento de objetivos organizacionais (Seibert et al., 2011). O PMS habilitante, visto como elemento do empowerment estrutural, constitui-se em um componente organizacional que pode levar os funcionários à percepção de empowerment psicológico e, de forma indireta, ao desempenho de tarefas. Assim, formulou-se a sexta hipótese da pesquisa: H6a: o PMS habilitante mediado pelo empowerment psicológico associa-se positivamente ao desempenho de tarefas. 2.7 PMS Habilitante, Empowerment Psicológico e Satisfação no Trabalho Práticas gerenciais que envolvem elementos como o compartilhamento de informações, descentralização, tomada de decisão participativa, treinamento extensivo e compensação contingente podem afetar as quatro dimensões do empowerment psicológico, uma vez que aumentam a quantidade de informações e autonomia dos funcionários em seu trabalho, ampliam o conhecimento e habilidades relacionadas às atividades laborais e motivação dos indivíduos, permitindo que estes preencham suas necessidades intrínsecas, elevando sua satisfação no trabalho (Seibert et al., 2011). R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 202 Reflexos do sistema de mensuração de desempenho habilitante na performance de tarefas e satisfa ção no trabalho Bordin et al. (2006) encontraram associação positiva entre acesso à informação e satisfação no trabalho em uma amostra de funcionários de tecnologia da informação (TI) em Singapura. Chan, Nadler e Hargis (2015) observaram associação positiva entre empowerment psicológico e satisfação no trabalho em uma amostra de funcionários de uma distribuidora de materiais esportivos nos Estados Unidos da América. Tomados em conjunto, os achados podem indicar relação indireta entre as variáveis. Pesquisas de Laschinger et al. (2001, 2004) com trabalhadores da área da saúde têm apontado que as condições do ambiente de trabalho relacionadas a informações, habilidades, conhecimento, aprendizado, feedback e suporte exercem inf uência na satisfação no trabalho por meio do empowerment psicológico. Liden et al. (2000) encontraram evidências de que características do trabalho, como identidade de tarefas, signif cado de tarefas e feedback , estão relacionadas indiretamente com a satisfação no trabalho por meio das dimensões de signif cado e competência. Os mecanismos subjacentes a essa relação compreendem três estados psicológicos críticos associados com características do trabalho: signif cado experimentado, responsabilidade experimentada e conhecimento sobre os resultados. Seibert et al. (2004) verif caram que o empowerment psicológico pode atuar como mediador de práticas organizacionais chave (compartilhamento de informações, autonomia e accountability de equipes) e da satisfação no trabalho. Destacam que o compartilhamento de informações implica fornecer informações sobre custos, produtividade, qualidade e desempenho f nanceiro dos empregados, enquanto a autonomia inclui práticas e estruturas organizacionais que possibilitam ações autônomas, como visão e objetivos claros, procedimentos de trabalho e áreas de responsabilidade. As evidências trazidas pelos estudos permitem inferir que o PMS habilitante tem características relacionadas ao compartilhamento de informações, clareza de objetivos e metas e a possibilidade de aprendizado e uso das habilidades capazes de inf uenciar a satisfação no trabalho, ao permitir que o indivíduo experimente sentimentos de empowerment psicológico. Nesse sentido, elaborou-se a sétima hipótese da pesquisa: H 6b: o PMS habilitante mediado pelo empowerment psicológico associa-se positivamente à satisfação no trabalho. Na Figura 1 ilustra-se a representação dos construtos da pesquisa com as relações propostas nas hipóteses formuladas neste estudo. De acordo com a f gura, o foco da investigação é acerca dos reflexos do PMS habilitante, composto pelas dimensões de reparo, f exibilidade, transparência interna e transparência global no desempenho de tarefas e na satisfação no trabalho, por meio do empowerment psicológico composto pelas dimensões autodeterminação, competência, impacto e signif cado em um CSC. H5 + H4 + H6b + H6a + H3 + H2 + H1 + PMS habilitante RP FX TI TG Empowerment psicológico AD CT IM SG Desempenho de tarefas Satisfação no trabalho Figura 1 Modelo teórico da pesquisa AD = autodeterminação; CT = competência; FX = f exibilidade; IM = impacto; PMS = sistema de mensuração de desempenho (performance measurement system); RP = reparo; SG = signif cado; TG = transparência global; TI = transparência interna. Fonte: Elaborada pelos autores. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 203 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren 3. METODOLOGIA DA PESQUISA Esta pesquisa foi realizada a partir de uma survey com funcionários do nível operacional de um CSC. Identif cou- se um CSC em que os funcionários operacionais tivessem acesso aos mecanismos de avaliação de desempenho e que não houvesse diferenças entre os setores quanto à forma de acesso e de avaliação. A seleção do CSC foi realizada por meio do envio de convites contendo o prospecto do estudo. Após a identif cação do potencial participante, f zeram-se contatos via telefone e presencialmente para detalhar a pesquisa. O CSC objeto de estudo localiza-se na Região Sul do Brasil e desempenha atividades de back of ce na estrutura de uma companhia de matriz europeia. Ao todo, a estrutura global da CSC tem 1.900 funcionários que atendem a 90 unidades em 25 países. A unidade de back of ce do CSC brasileiro, objeto deste estudo, atende a aproximadamente 16% do volume total de operações, com 125 funcionários operacionais (41 analistas e 84 assistentes) que atuam em contato direto com os clientes, no caso, outras unidades da empresa, oferecendo serviços administrativos, f nanceiros e contábeis. Obteve-se a participação de 88 respondentes, distribuídos entre os setores de procure-to-pay (63,64%), record-to-report (20,45%), order-to-cash (11,36%) e suporte (4,55%). Esses setores correspondem a todas as áreas que lidam com prestação de serviços da unidade. 3.1 Construtos e Instrumento da Pesquisa Na Tabela 3 são reportados os construtos, sua def nição operacional, o número de assertivas empregadas em cada dimensão no questionário e as respectivas referências. Tabela 3 Construto da pesquisa Construtos VariáveisDef nição operacional QuestõesReferências PMS habilitante Reparo Possibilidade de o próprio usuário reparar o processo ao invés de forçar a interrupção do trabalho diante de uma falha ou impasse. 3 Van Der Hauwaert e Bruggeman (2015) Transparência interna A lógica de funcionamento do processo e as informações sobre seu status estão disponíveis e são apresentadas de forma inteligível. 3 Transparência global Disponibilidade de informação ao usuário sobre o estado de todo o processo de produção. 3 Flexibilidade Possibilidade de os empregados modif carem processos para atender às demandas específ cas. 3 Empowerment psicológico Autodeterminação Autonomia do indivíduo para decidir acerca dos métodos, esforço e ritmo das atividades. 3 Spreitzer (1995) Competência Capacidades individuais para desenvolver adequadamente as atividades do trabalho. 3 Impacto Influência do indivíduo sobre resultados estratégicos, administrativos e operacionais. 3 Signif cado Congruência entre os requisitos do trabalho e as crenças, valores e comportamentos individuais. 3 Satisfação no trabalho Satisfação no trabalho Resposta emocional às condições físicas e sociais nos locais e tarefas de trabalho. 6Tarrant e Sabo (2010) Desempenho de tarefas Desempenho de tarefas Nível com que o indivíduo realiza as tarefas específ cas de seu trabalho. 6 Mahama e Cheng (2013) PMS = sistema de mensuração de desempenho (performance measurement system). Fonte: Elaborada pelos autores. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 204 Reflexos do sistema de mensuração de desempenho habilitante na performance de tarefas e satisfa ção no trabalho O instrumento de pesquisa foi elaborado com assertivas já validadas em outros estudos, mas seu uso conjunto é específ co desta pesquisa. Embora o conceito de PMS habilitante tenha sido utilizado anteriormente, os estudos o empregaram de forma qualitativa (Jordan & Messner, 2012; Mundy, 2010; Wouters & Roijmans, 2011; Wouters & Wilderon, 2008). Assim, para captar as dimensões de reparo, transparência interna, transparência global e f exibilidade, que compõem os controles habilitantes, utilizou-se o instrumento de Van Der Hauwaert e Bruggeman (2015), único encontrado até então que se propôs a estudar o PMS habilitante por uma abordagem quantitativa. Fundamentados nos estudos de Adler e Borys (1996) e Ahrens e Chapman (2004), elaboraram um questionário para investigar PMS, reportando os procedimentos utilizados para a validação do instrumento, como a realização de análise fatorial e índices de ajustes. As dimensões de autodeterminação, competência, impacto e signif cado, que compõem o empowerment psicológico, foram captadas por meio do instrumento de pesquisa de Spreitzer (1995), desenvolvido a partir dos estudos de Conger e Kanungo (1988) e T omas e Velthouse (1990). Esse questionário já foi aplicado em pesquisas sobre PMS por Hall (2008) e Yuliansyah e Khan (2015). Para captar o construto unidimensional de satisfação no trabalho, utilizou-se o Job Satisfaction Index de Tarrant e Sabo (2010). Esse instrumento foi elaborado para avaliar a satisfação de trabalhadores da área da saúde. Sua versão em português foi validada por Palomino e Frezatti (2016), em um estudo sobre conf ito e ambiguidade de papéis com controllers brasileiros. Para captar o construto unidimensional de desempenho de tarefas utilizou-se o questionário de Mahama e Cheng (2013), a versão reduzida do instrumento de Kathuria e Davis (2001) concebido a partir do estudo de Carroll e Schneier (1982). O instrumento da survey foi ancorado em escala Likert de sete pontos, em consonância com os instrumentos originais. Houve customização do instrumento em atenção ao vocabulário utilizado na unidade, como forma de evitar ambiguidades. A survey foi aplicada presencialmente na empresa, em fevereiro de 2016. No dia anterior à coleta, pela área de recursos humanos, enviou-se aos funcionários um informativo para solicitar a participação e dar conhecimento sobre o teor do estudo. Os dados coletados foram tabulados e submetidos a tratamento estatístico nos sof wares Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 21 (SPSS) e Smart PLS 3. Nenhum dos 88 questionários apresentou missing values . As relações propostas no modelo teórico foram analisadas por meio de modelagem de equações estruturais por mínimos quadrados parciais (partial least squares structural equation modeling – PLS-SEM). Essa técnica de análise multivariada permite testar um conjunto de relações simultaneamente a partir da explicação da variância entre os construtos do modelo (Hair, Hult, Ringle & Sarstedt, 2016). Sua aplicação é considerada apropriada em estudos exploratórios em que se busca o desenvolvimento de teorias (Hair et al., 2016). 3.2 Construção do Modelo Hierárquico O modelo utilizado emprega variáveis de segunda ordem. Os higher-order models ou hierarchical component models são utilizados quando se pretende analisar construtos em níveis mais elevados de abstração. Assim são criadas variáveis latentes (VLs) de segunda ordem a partir de construtos de primeira ordem que se referem a seus atributos (Hair et al., 2016). Além disso, ao se reduzir a quantidade de relações no modelo estrutural, o modelo de caminhos do PLS torna-se mais harmonioso e compreensível (Hair et al., 2016). O modelo hierárquico em questão é ref exivo-formativo tipo II. Optou-se pela abordagem de dois estágios (two- stage approach ) por esta ser a mais indicada em modelos de caminhos complexos em que existem variáveis de segunda ordem em posição endógena (Ringle, Sarstedt & Straub, 2012). Becker, Klein e Wetzels (2012) apontaram que o two-stage approach está entre as melhores abordagens e apresenta-se como alternativa útil para estudos que visam a analisar apenas as relações de segunda ordem. Os construtos PMS habilitante e empowerment psicológico foram obtidos a partir dos scores das quatro dimensões que os compõem. O PMS habilitante integra as dimensões reparo, f exibilidade, transparência interna e global, e sua análise conjunta a partir de uma variável de segunda ordem assemelha-se à ideia de percepção geral dos controles habilitantes, como utilizado por Mahama e Cheng (2013). No entanto, os autores utilizaram uma escala própria unidimensional enquanto que, neste estudo, reconhecem-se as quatro dimensões separadamente e uma percepção geral a partir de um segundo nível de abstração. O empowerment psicológico, formado por competência, autodeterminação, impacto e signif cado, é um conceito que propõe a percepção de suas quatro dimensões simultaneamente, formando um gestalt (Spreitzer, 2008), ou seja, as dimensões isoladas não são suf cientes para traduzir o empowerment psicológico. Seibert et al. (2011), em discussão sobre a validade estatística de se utilizar este construto segregado em suas dimensões ou de forma conjunta, apoiam a operacionalização do construto de forma conjunta, o que motivou seu uso nesta pesquisa como variável de segunda ordem. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 205 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren Embora as variáveis PMS habilitante e empowerment psicológico sejam de segunda ordem, para fins de avaliação dos modelos de mensuração e estrutural, é necessário considerar os resultados obtidos com o modelo de primeira ordem (Becker, Klein & Wetzels, 2012). Por esse motivo, na sequência são apresentados os resultados obtidos com o modelo no primeiro estágio do two-stage approach, ou seja, detalhando cada dimensão dos construtos medidos. 4. DESCRIÇÃO E ANÁLISE DOS RESULTADOS 4.1 Avaliação do Modelo de Mensuração e Estrutural Na avaliação do modelo de mensuração estrutural consideraram-se a validade convergente, a conf abilidade composta e a validade discriminante. Para conf rmar os critérios recomendados na validade convergente, verif cou-se se os indicadores de cada VL do modelo compartilham de uma variância comum por meio da análise das cargas fatoriais de cada indicador, da variância média extraída (average extracted variance – AVE) das VLs, além da conf abilidade composta e alfa de Cronbach , que indicam a consistência interna (Hair et al., 2016). Na Tabela 4 apresentam-se esses valores f nais. Nota-se, nesta tabela, que todos os fatores apresentam valores superiores ao mínimo recomendado, de 0,50 para AVE e 0,70 para CC e alfa de Cronbach (Hair et al., 2016), ou seja, há validade convergente e validade composta no modelo proposto. Tabela 4 Validade convergente e consistência dos construtos Variáveis AV EConf abilidade composta Alfa de Cronbach Reparo 0,8070,9260,882 Flexibilidade 0,7600,9050,841 Transparência interna 0,6850,8670,771 Transparência global 0,7070,8790,794 Autodeterminação 0,8550,9460,915 Competência 0,8430,9410,906 Impacto 0,8270,9350,895 Signif cado 0,9410,9800,969 Satisfação no trabalho 0,7540,9480,934 Desempenho de tarefas 0,6330,9110,883 AVE = variância média extraída (average extracted variance). Fonte: Elaborada pelos autores. Quanto à validade discriminante, que indica o quanto um construto é individualmente distinto dos demais (Hair et al., 2016), inicialmente observaram- se os resultados da matriz crossloadings empregada nas variáveis, que apontaram inexistência de cargas cruzadas entre os construtos do modelo. Em seguida, averiguou-se o critério de Fornell e Larcker (1981), em que se compara a raiz quadrada da AVE com a correlação entre as VLs. Para que haja validade discriminante, recomenda-se que as correlações entre os construtos sejam maiores que a raiz quadrada da AVE. Na Tabela 5 apresentam-se os valores da correlação entre as variáveis e verif ca-se que nenhuma das correlações entre os construtos foi superior à raiz quadrada da AVE, indicando que existe validade discriminante (Fornell & Larcker, 1981). Assim, o modelo atende aos principais pressupostos de validação (convergente e discriminante). Na Tabela 6 apresentam-se os resultados do modelo estrutural. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 206 Reflexos do sistema de mensuração de desempenho habilitante na performance de tarefas e satisfa ção no trabalho Tabela 5 Validade discriminante (Fornell & Larcker, 1981) Variáveis ADCTDT FXIM RP STSG TG TI Autodeterminação (AD) 0,925 Competência (CT) 0,2810,918 Desempenho de tarefas (DT) 0,350 0,3830,795 Flexibilidade (FX) 0,5210,0890,3590,872 Impacto (IM) 0,6200,2610,4630,6250,909 Reparo (RP) 0,4330,1050,2620,7030,4370,899 Satisfação no trabalho (ST) 0,492 0,0400,4200,6220,5300,4560,869 Signif cado (SG) 0,5240,1740,4430,5570,6220,3330,7180,970 Transparência global (TG) 0,495 0,0840,3460,7740,5300,7380,6260,5180,841 Transparência interna (TI) 0,439 0,1130,3310,6890,5290,7070,4410,3520,7460,828 Fonte: Elaborada pelos autores. Tabela 6 Resultados do modelo estrutural Variáveis R 2 R2 adjustedQ 2 SRMR f 2 VIF Reparo 0,000-0,0252,749 Flexibilidade 0,000-0,1343,470 Transparência interna 0,002-0,0302,830 Transparência global 0,000-0,0663,748 Autodeterminação 0,2950,2610,2120,0710,001-0,008 1,862 Competência 0,014-0,033 -0,022 0,0710,022-0,113 1,128 Impacto 0,4140,3860,3260,0710,000-0,020 2,448 Signif cado 0,3600,3290,3190,0710,041-0,329 1,998 Satisfação no trabalho 0,6230,5850,4450,071 Desempenho de tarefas 0,3380,2710,1720,071 SRMR = standardized root mean square residual (raiz do resíduo quadrático médio padronizado); VIF = variance inf ation factor (fator de inf ação da variância). Fonte: Elaborada pelos autores. Nota-se, na Tabela 3, que a acurácia preditiva do modelo para a dimensão da satisfação no trabalho e desempenho de tarefas apresenta-se moderada (Peng & Lai, 2012), com valores de R 2 e R 2 adjusted que variam entre 0,623/0,585 e 0,338/0,271, respectivamente. Os valores de Q 2 indicam se o modelo tem relevância preditiva e devem ser superiores a 0 (Peng & Lai, 2012). Portanto, a dimensão competência do empowerment psicológico não atende a esse critério, além de apresentar R 2 adjusted com valor negativo, o que indica que sua contribuição para a capacidade explicativa e preditiva do modelo não é satisfatória. No entanto, a competência compõe o construto teórico das quatro dimensões do empowerment psicológico (Spreitzer, 2008); assim, optou-se por mantê- lo, já que o foco desta pesquisa está na avaliação dos caminhos para as variáveis de segunda ordem. O valor da raiz quadrada padronizada dos resíduos inferior a 0,08 indica que o modelo se adequa às necessidades dos dados empíricos (Latan, Ringle & Jabbour, 2016). Os valores do tamanho dos efeitos variam de não existentes para reparo  satisfação no trabalho R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 207 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren (f2 = 0), f exibilidade  competência (f 2 = 0), transparência global  competência (f 2 = 0) e impacto  satisfação no trabalho, até efeitos médios, como signif cado  satisfação no trabalho (f 2 = 0,329). Por f m, os valores de fator de inf ação da variância (variance inf ation factor – VIF) inferiores a 5 para todas as variáveis independentes indicam não haver problemas de colinearidade (Hair et al., 2016). Após a avaliação do modelo de mensuração estrutural, calculou-se o coef ciente de caminhos com 5.000 interações. Em seguida, aplicou-se a técnica de bootstrapping para avaliar o nível de signif cância entre as relações dos construtos, com 5.000 subamostras, intervalo de conf ança bias-corrected and accelerated e teste unicaudal ao nível de signif cância de 5% (Hair et al., 2016; Marginson et al., 2014). A partir do bootstrapping , obtiveram-se os valores de caminho (path), t-valor e p-valor de cada relação, conforme Tabela 7. Tabela 7 Efeitos entre os construtos Relação entre os construtos HipóteseValort-valor p-valor PMS habilitante  desempenho de tarefas H 1 0,0101 0,05990,4761 PMS habilitante  empowerment psicológico H 2 0,6550 9,02150,0000** PMS habilitante  satisfação no trabalho H 3 0,3145 3,29920,0005** Empowerment psicológico  desempenho de tarefas H 4 0,4008 2,54140,0055* Empowerment psicológico  satisfação no trabalho H 5 0,4696 4,99980,0000** PMS habilitante  empowerment psicológico  desempenho de tarefas H 6a 0,2626 2,49200,0064* PMS habilitante  empowerment psicológico  satisfação no trabalho H 6b 0,3076 4,32240,0000** PMS = sistema de mensuração de desempenho (performance measurement system). *, **: signif cante a 0,01 e a 0,001, respectivamente. Fonte: Elaborada pelos autores. Pelos resultados da Tabela 7, das sete hipóteses formuladas, apenas uma não obteve valores que permitam sua sustentação. A seguir são discutidas suas possíveis implicações. 4.6 Discussão dos Resultados A hipótese H 1, que previa relação positiva e signif cante entre PMS habilitante e desempenho de tarefas, não foi suportada (p-valor > 0,05). Portanto, não se pode af rmar que um PMS com informações claras sobre metas, objetivos, visão e missão, e que seja transparente acerca das relações causais entre esses elementos e as ações dos funcionários, tanto localmente quanto na estrutura global da empresa, ou que possibilite identif car problemas e solucioná-los de forma ativa, possa levar a um melhor desempenho nas tarefas. A Teoria da Fixação de Metas propõe que as metas podem ser consideradas intenções, propósitos, resultados desejados e padrões ou alvos de desempenho conscientemente propostos que afetam o desempenho ao direcionar a atenção para a seleção de estratégias, conhecimento e ações apropriadas (Marginson et al., 2014). Assim, esperava-se que o PMS habilitante fosse capaz de desencadear os processos previstos por essa teoria a ponto de inf uenciar o desempenho. No entanto, o resultado da H 1 corrobora Bandura (1986), para o qual a motivação para desempenhar atividades não depende apenas das metas propriamente ditas, mas também da necessidade de se obter um senso pessoal de satisfação diante delas. A hipótese H 2, que previa relação signif cante e positiva entre PMS habilitante e empowerment psicológico, foi suportada (p-valor < 0,001). Indica que disponibilizar um PMS capaz de estimular a interação entre o indivíduo e o ambiente de modo a promover o uso de suas habilidades e aprendizado, além de oferecer informações claras que deem suporte ao seu trabalho, faz os funcionários reportarem sentimentos mais elevados de motivação intrínseca, ou seja, percebem o ambiente laboral de maneira positiva e consideram ter as habilidades necessárias para realizar seu trabalho e serem capazes de inf uenciar os resultados de sua organização, sentem ter controle sobre a distribuição de suas tarefas em sua rotina e entendem seu trabalho como alinhado aos seus valores pessoais. Hall (2008) e Yuliansyah e Khan (2015) observaram associação positiva entre compreensibilidade dos PMS e empowerment psicológico. Marginson et al. (2014) constataram que estilos de uso do PMS, que envolvem a forma de usar e disponibilizar a informação, estão associados positivamente ao empowerment psicológico. No entanto, Mahama e Cheng (2013) não encontraram relação R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 208 Reflexos do sistema de mensuração de desempenho habilitante na performance de tarefas e satisfa ção no trabalho positiva direta de nenhuma dimensão do empowerment psicológico com características habilitantes do sistema de custeio. Assim como o PMS, sistemas de custeio proveem informação essencial sobre as atividades dos funcionários e da organização, mas, no caso do sistema de custeio, este somente se relacionou com o empowerment psicológico por meio da intensidade de uso do sistema, o que sugere que a compreensão do seu nível semântico varia (DeLone & McLean, 2003), possivelmente pela complexidade envolvida nas informações de custeio (Mahama & Cheng, 2013). A hipótese H 3, que previa relação signif cante e positiva entre PMS habilitante e satisfação no trabalho, foi suportada (p-valor < 0,001). Indica que indivíduos que dispõem de maior acesso a informações sobre seu desempenho, sobre os efeitos de seu trabalho na organização e que podem se amparar no PMS para utilizar sua experiência e ampliar seu conhecimento têm suas necessidades individuais relacionadas ao trabalho preenchidas e, assim, reportam maiores níveis de satisfação. Kanter (1977) argumenta que, na ausência de informações necessárias para conduzir suas tarefas, o indivíduo poderá experimentar sentimentos negativos, como frustração, o que levaria ao aumento de tensão no trabalho e interferiria negativamente na satisfação (Spreitzer, 1995, 2008). A hipótese H 4, que previa relação signif cante e positiva entre empowerment psicológico e desempenho de tarefas, foi suportada (p-valor < 0,01). Esse resultado indica que a motivação intrínseca no trabalho, manifestada pelo reconhecimento de que tem os requisitos necessários para atender às demandas de sua tarefa, controle sobre sua rotina, capacidade de contribuir com resultados obtidos por seu departamento ou organização e congruência entre valores organizacionais e pessoais, conduz os funcionários a terem condutas positivas no seu trabalho, como maior persistência, assertividade, concentração e resiliência, o que pode levá-los a obter melhores resultados em suas atividades. No entanto, estudos que abordaram a relação entre empowerment psicológico e desempenho têm mostrado diferentes resultados acerca da saliência das dimensões. Mahama e Cheng (2013) observaram relações positivas entre competência, autodeterminação e desempenho de tarefas em gestores de diversas áreas. Marginson et al. (2014) constataram relações entre competência, signif cado, autodeterminação e desempenho de gestores. Hall (2008) identif cou ref exos positivos apenas para a dimensão signif cado no desempenho gerencial. Yuliansyah e Khan (2015), ao investigar funcionários operacionais da área de serviços, observaram relações positivas entre as dimensões competência, autodeterminação e desempenho e negativas entre a dimensão impacto e desempenho. A hipótese H 5, que previa relação signif cante e positiva entre empowerment psicológico e satisfação no trabalho, foi suportada (p-valor < 0,001). Indica que a satisfação no trabalho é suscetível de inf uência à medida que o indivíduo sente que suas crenças coadunam com as atividades que realiza, há discricionariedade quanto à forma de organizar e priorizar suas atividades, as exigências do trabalho podem ser atendidas por suas habilidades e conhecimento e ele visualiza os ref exos de seus atos no desempenho de sua unidade. T omas e Velthouse (1990) af rmam que níveis baixos de signif cado estão ligados à baixa satisfação no trabalho e sentimentos de apatia, enquanto níveis elevados de autonomia contribuem para a satisfação. Spreitzer (2008) aduz que há forte relação entre a dimensão signif cado e satisfação no trabalho e, em menor medida, com a dimensão competência, e a satisfação relaciona-se com a dimensão impacto, ao aumentar o envolvimento com o trabalho e permitir ao indivíduo sentir sua contribuição com os resultados (Bordin et al., 2006). A hipótese H 6a, que previa relação significante e positiva entre PMS habilitante mediado pelo empowerment psicológico e o desempenho de tarefas, foi suportada (p-valor < 0,01). Isso indica que, ao proporcionar para os empregados um PMS habilitante que associe a disponibilidade de informação em todos os níveis da empresa com a possibilidade de lidar ativamente com ela, compreender sua lógica e utilizá-la como instrumento de apoio no atendimento às suas demandas e que favoreça o aprendizado pode fazer com que enxerguem seu ambiente de trabalho de forma positiva. Desse modo, terão os elementos necessários para executar seu trabalho adequadamente e experimentarão o empowerment psicológico. Ao perceber motivação intrínseca no trabalho, os funcionários atuarão de maneira mais favorável perante as exigências de seu contexto laboral para obter melhores resultados. Embora Liden et al. (2000), Seibert et al. (2004) e Wang e Lee (2009) não tenham investigado SCG ou PMS, seus achados tangenciam elementos característicos desses sistemas, com indícios de que tais elementos poderiam ocorrer num PMS, aspecto corroborado por esta pesquisa e que reforça, de maneira conjunta, os elementos notados nesses estudos. A hipótese H 6b, que previa relação significante e positiva entre PMS habilitante mediado pelo empowerment psicológico e satisfação no trabalho, foi suportada (p-valor < 0,001). Esse resultado sugere que, ao interagir com um PMS habilitante, os funcionários podem perceber o empowerment psicológico, ou seja, experimentar que, na relação entre indivíduo e ambiente de trabalho R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 209 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren estão presentes as dimensões de competência, impacto, autodeterminação e signif cado, as quais são suscetíveis de atender a necessidades intrínsecas do indivíduo, associando-se a maiores níveis de satisfação no trabalho. Este resultado corrobora o achado de Burney e Matherly (2007), de que um PMS integrado que ofereça informação relevante para o trabalho associa-se positivamente com a satisfação no trabalho, porém a compreensibilidade do sistema, ou seja, oferecer uma ampla variedade de indicadores de desempenho, não se revelou associada com a satisfação no trabalho no referido estudo. Burney e Matherly (2007) argumentam que prover uma ampla gama de indicadores estaria na conformação de uma visão holística do funcionamento da organização para aumentar a conf ança na tomada de decisão. Essa justif cativa é próxima da concepção de transparência interna e global que compõe o conceito de PMS habilitante. Porém, a def nição da transparência interna inclui a exposição da lógica de funcionamento dos processos e informações de maneira inteligível, o que sugere que não basta disponibilizar um volume de informações; é necessário que estejam num formato que o indivíduo consiga compreender e associá-las ao funcionamento do sistema para que assim a percepção da relevância dessa informação possa desencadear o sentimento de empowerment psicológico e, então, conectar-se à satisfação no trabalho. Essa intrincada relação que leva uma informação do PMS a afetar a satisfação pode justif car as evidências encontradas nesta pesquisa, diante da ausência de relação constatada no estudo de Burney e Matherly (2007). Os resultados do modelo teórico-empírico, quando vistos de forma abrangente, podem indicar que, mesmo em ambientes com controles mecanicistas, foco estrito em padronização e processos documentados, como ocorre em CSC, é possível estimular o empowerment psicológico e obter resultados positivos no desempenho de tarefas e satisfação no trabalho. No entanto, isso implica ajustar o PMS de modo a possibilitar a compreensão da lógica que compõe seus fatores e permitir que os funcionários relacionem-se com esses sistemas de modo a favorecer o aprendizado e o uso de suas habilidades. No estudo considerado a primeira revisão da literatura sobre CSC, Richter & Bruhl (2017) verif caram que, dentre os 83 artigos identif cados, não houve utilização de teorias psicológicas para explicar fenômenos que ocorrem nessas organizações. Em geral, os estudos aplicam teorias econômicas, de estratégia e sócio-organizacionais e buscam verif car a relação entre práticas de governança, nível de centralização e dependência tecnológica no desempenho organizacional, em geral por meio de diferentes aspectos da conf guração estratégica dessas empresas (Richter & Bruhl, 2017). O cenário trazido pela pesquisa de Richter e Bruhl (2017) denota a dif culdade de contextualização dos achados deste estudo. Entretanto, em estudos com características semelhantes, como o de Hechanova, Alampay e Franco (2006), que investigou a relação entre empowerment psicológico, satisfação e desempenho no trabalho de funcionários asiáticos de cinco setores de serviços (hotel, call center, banco, alimentação e companhias aéreas), o empowerment psicológico mostrou-se associado positivamente ao desempenho e satisfação. Porém, os empregados das áreas de call center e companhias aéreas relataram os menores níveis de empowerment e de satisfação quando comparados aos demais setores. Os autores argumentam que características estruturais desenhadas para suportar os modelos de negócio das empresas, como orientação para produtividade, atendimento a normas rígidas, distância entre funcionário e cliente e possibilidades de customização, aspectos também presentes em CSC, são relevantes para compreender os resultados. Tais evidências reforçam os resultados deste estudo, ao apontar que é necessário encontrar abordagens capazes de permitir a manifestação do empowerment nesses ambientes, dados os resultados positivos de tal manifestação. Spreitzer (2008) já havia observado que a percepção do indivíduo quanto aos elementos que compõem seu ambiente de trabalho é determinante de seu empowerment psicológico. Nesse sentido, apesar das restrições inerentes ao ambiente de um CSC, o indivíduo pode obter uma percepção positiva, desde que haja estímulo para isso, o que as evidências deste estudo indicaram ser possível por meio de um PMS habilitante. Ao evidenciar que tais relações são possíveis em um CSC, poder-se-ia sugerir que, em ambientes com controles f uidos, os resultados teriam potencial ainda mais proeminente. 5. CONSIDERAÇÕES FINAIS O estudo analisou os reflexos dos PMS com características habilitantes no desempenho de tarefas e satisfação no trabalho, mediados pelo empowerment psicológico em um CSC. Os resultados indicaram que a teoria dos controles habilitantes aplicada ao PMS é congruente com o empowerment psicológico. O PMS é expressivo no contexto organizacional devido à sua capacidade de inf uenciar o comportamento dos R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 210 Reflexos do sistema de mensuração de desempenho habilitante na performance de tarefas e satisfa ção no trabalho funcionários e obter cooperação para o atingimento dos objetivos organizacionais (Demartini, 2014). Este estudo sugere que isso se dá pela percepção de empowerment psicológico oportunizada ao se conf gurar o PMS a partir da lógica habilitante e com isso permitir maior integração entre PMS e usuário. Os resultados deste estudo conf rmam a importância do compartilhamento de informações destacado nas práticas gerenciais citadas por Kanter (1977), elemento- chave para o empowerment. No entanto, apenas possibilitar o acesso dos funcionários a uma vasta gama de informações pode não ser suficiente (Burney & Matherly, 2007), visto que o PMS habilitante propõe o compartilhamento de informações, porém com foco na inteligibilidade e expondo sua lógica subjacente, elementos que colocam o usuário do PMS em uma posição ativa perante o sistema. PMS que suportem características habilitantes também podem ser efetivos em inf uenciar a motivação dos funcionários e seu desempenho, além de contribuir positivamente com a satisfação no trabalho. Ao se considerar que a atenção dos gestores é limitada (Simons, 1992), a conf guração de um PMS habilitante poderia ser alternativa em contextos nos quais os gestores são bastante demandados ou atuam com alguma restrição. Outro ponto que se destaca é o contexto deste estudo. CSC são caracterizados como ambientes de trabalho com rotinas estabelecidas, pormenorizadas e alto volume de demandas (Bergeron, 2003). Essas características mostram-se atribuíveis a organizações mecanicistas, mas os resultados permitem aventar que, mesmo em ambientes menos orgânicos, a implementação do PMS habilitante pode funcionar como elemento capaz de contornar os efeitos adversos do contexto e estimular o empowerment psicológico, produzindo resultados atitudinais e comportamentais positivos. Nesse sentido, a validação do modelo proposto em um CSC indica que o paradoxo entre controlar e f exibilizar simultaneamente pode ser abordado pela ótica dos controles habilitantes (Ahrens & Chapman, 2004). Ao se empregar sistemas e processos conf gurados pela lógica da usabilidade (Adler & Borys, 1996), ter-se-iam controles imbuídos de maior legitimidade e com características mecanicistas menos salientes. No entanto, as conclusões deste estudo requerem parcimônia, por se tratar de um estudo transversal realizado em apenas uma organização, sendo que diferenças contextuais ou temporais podem ensejar resultados dissemelhantes. Embora a teoria apresente o sentido esperado das relações, estudos longitudinais podem identif car se empiricamente tais aspectos se conf rmam. Pesquisas com recortes temporais longitudinais que avaliem as relações de causalidade entre as variáveis deste estudo podem contribuir para maior compreensão do modelo. Além disso, investigaram-se funcionários operacionais que desenvolvem atividades administrativas, contábeis e f nanceiras em um CSC, portanto, gestores ou funcionários que atuem em atividades com outras características podem apresentar percepções diversas. Recomenda-se que pesquisas sobre características do PMS investiguem em outras formas organizacionais a relação entre controles habilitantes e empowerment psicológico, para ampliar e consolidar as evidências sobre o tema, já que a teoria dos controles habilitantes denota relações com aspectos cognitivos e motivacionais que ainda demandam verif cações empíricas e têm potencial para evidenciar outras associações entre PMS e resultados organizacionais positivos. Pesquisas futuras devem considerar eventuais riscos na adoção dos construtos, como os possíveis efeitos isolados de determinadas dimensões sobre os resultados e a ocorrência de trade o f que podem f car ocultos ao se utilizar variáveis de segunda ordem ou unidimensionais, com maior ênfase no construto de PMS habilitante, que tem características pouco exploradas de forma quantitativa na literatura. Outra sugestão é que as relações sugeridas neste modelo sejam analisadas por outros delineamentos metodológicos e técnicas estatísticas para aumentar a validade e conf abilidade dessas evidências. REFERÊNCIAS Adler, P. S., & Borys, B. (1996). Two types of bureaucracy: enabling and coercive. Administrative Science Quarterly, 41(1), 61-89. Ahrens, T., & Chapman, C. S. (2004). Accounting for f exibility and ef ciency: a f eld study of management control systems in a restaurant chain. Contemporary Accounting Research , 21(2), 271-301. Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action. Englewood, NJ: Prentice Hall. B ecker, J., Klein, K., & Wetzels, M. (2012). Hierarchical latent variable models in PLS-SEM: guidelines for using ref ective- formative type models. Long Range Planning , 45(5), 359-394. Bergeron, B. (2003). Essentials of shared services. Hoboken: Wiley. Birnberg, J. G., Luf , J., & Shields, M. D. (2006). Psychology theory in management accounting research. In Hopwoof, A. G., & Chapman, C. S. (Orgs.). Handbook of management accounting research (pp. 111-135). Amsterdam: Elsevier. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 211 Guilherme Eduardo de Souza & Ilse Maria Beuren Bordin, C., Bartram, T., & Casimir, G. (2006). T e antecedents and consequences of psychological empowerment among Singaporean IT employees. Management Research News, 30(1), 34-46. Burney, L. L., & Matherly, M. (2007). Examining performance measurement from an integrated perspective. Journal of Information Systems , 21(2), 49-68. Carroll, S. J., & Schneier, C. E. (1982). Performance appraisal and review systems: the identif cation, measurement, and development of performance in organizations. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman. Chan, Y. H., Nadler, S. S., & Hargis, M. B. (2015). Attitudinal and behavioral outcomes of employees’ psychological empowerment: a structural equation modeling approach. Journal of Organizational Culture, Communication and Conf ict , 19(1), 24-41. Chenhall, R. H. (2003). Management control systems design within its organizational context: f ndings from contingency- based research and directions for the future. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 28(2), 127-168. Chiang, C. F., & Hsieh, T. S. (2012). T e impacts of perceived organizational support and psychological empowerment on job performance: the mediating ef ects of organizational citizenship behavior. International Journal of Hospitality Management, 31(1), 180-190. Conger, J. A., & Kanungo, R. N. (1988). T e empowerment process: integrating theory and practice. Academy of Management Review, 13(3), 471-482. DeLone, W. H., & McLean, E. R. (2003). T e DeLone and McLean model of information systems success: a ten-year update. Journal of Management Information Systems, 19(4), 9-30. Demartini, C. (2014). Performance management systems. Berlin: Springer. Drake, A. R., Wong, J., & Salter, S. B. (2007). Empowerment, motivation, and performance: examining the impact of feedback and incentives on nonmanagement employees. Behavioral Research in Accounting , 19(1), 71-89. Flamholtz, E. G., Das, T. K., & Tsui, A. S. (1985). Toward an integrative framework of organizational control. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 10(1), 35-50. Fornell, C., & Larcker, D. F. (1981). Structural equation models with unobservable variables and measurement error: algebra and statistics. Journal of Marketing Research , 18(3), 382-388. Franco-Santos, M., Lucianetti, L., & Bourne, M. (2012). Contemporary performance measurement systems: a review of their consequences and a framework for research. Management Accounting Research, 23(2), 79-119. Hair Jr., J. F., Hult, G. T. M., Ringle, C., & Sarstedt, M. (2016). A primer on partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). London: Sage Publication. Hall, M. (2008). T e ef ect of comprehensive performance measurement systems on role clarity, psychological empowerment and managerial performance. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 33(2), 141-163. He, P., Murrmann, S. K., & Perdue, R. R. (2010). An investigation of the relationships among employee empowerment, employee perceived service quality, and employee job satisfaction in a US hospitality organization. Journal of Foodservice Business Research , 13(1), 36-50. Hechanova, M., Alampay, R. B. A., & Franco, E. P. (2006). Psychological empowerment, job satisfaction and performance among Filipino service workers. Asian Journal of Social Psychology , 9(1), 72-78. Holdsworth, L., & Cartwright, S. (2003). Empowerment, stress and satisfaction: an exploratory study of a call centre. Leadership & Organization Development Journal, 24(3), 131-140. Ishzaka, A., & Blakiston, R. (2012). T e 18C’s model for a successful long-term outsourcing arrangement. Industrial Marketing Management , 41(7), 1071-1080. Jordan, S., & Messner, M. (2012). Enabling control and the problem of incomplete performance indicators. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 37(8), 544-564. Kanter, R. M. (1977). Men and women of the corporation. New York, NY: Basic Books. Kathuria, R., & Davis, E. B. (2001). Quality and work force management practices: the managerial performance implication. Production and Operations Management, 10(4), 460-477. Kuntz, J., & Roberts, A. (2014). Engagement and identif cation: an investigation of social and organizational predictors in an HR of shoring context. Strategic Outsourcing: An International Journal , 7(3), 253-274. Laschinger, H. K. S., Finegan, J. E., Shamian, J., & Wilk, P. (2004). A longitudinal analysis of the impact of workplace empowerment on work satisfaction. Journal of Organizational Behavior , 25(4), 527-545. Laschinger, H. K. S., Finegan, J., Shamian, J., & Wilk, P. (2001). Impact of structural and psychological empowerment on job strain in nursing work settings: expanding Kanter’s model. Journal of Nursing Administration , 31(5), 260-272. Latan, H., Ringle, C. M., & Jabbour, C. J. C. (2016). Whistleblowing intentions among public accountants in Indonesia: testing for the moderation ef ects. Journal of Business Ethics (2016). Retrieved from https://doi. org/10.1007/s10551-016-3318-0. Liden, R. C., Wayne, S. J., & Sparrowe, R. T. (2000). An examination of the mediating role of psychological empowerment on the relations between the job, interpersonal relationships, and work outcomes. Journal of Applied Psychology , 85(3), 407-416. Mahama, H., & Cheng, M. M. (2013). T e ef ect of managers’ enabling perceptions on costing system use, psychological empowerment, and task performance. Behavioral Research in Accounting , 25(1), 89-114. Marginson, D., Mcaulay, L., Roush, M., & Van Zijl, T. (2014). Examining a positive psychological role for performance measures. Management Accounting Research, 25(1), 63-75. Mostafa, A. M. S., & Gould-Williams, J. S. (2014). Testing the mediation ef ect of person–organization f t on the relationship between high performance HR practices and employee outcomes in the Egyptian public sector. T e International Journal of Human Resource Management, 25(2), 276-292. Mundy, J. (2010). Creating dynamic tensions through a balanced use of management control systems. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 35(5), 499-523. R. Cont. Fin. – USP, São Paulo, v. 29, n. 77, p. 194-212, mai./ago. 2018 212 Reflexos do sistema de mensuração de desempenho habilitante na performance de tarefas e satisfa ção no trabalho Palomino, M. N., & Frezatti, F. (2016). Role conf ict, role ambiguity and job satisfaction: Perceptions of the Brazilian controllers. Revista de Administração , 51(1), 165-181. Peng, D. X., & Lai, F. (2012). Using partial least squares in operations management research: A practical guideline and summary of past research. Journal of Operations Management, 30(6), 467-480. Richter, C. P., & Bruhl, R. (2017). Shared service center research: A review of the past, present, and future. European Management Journal , 35(1), 26-38. Ringle, C. M., Sarstedt, M., & Straub, D. (2012). A critical look at the use of PLS-SEM. MIS Quarterly, 36(1), III-XIV. Schulz, V., & Brenner, W. (2010). Characteristics of shared service centers. Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, 4(3), 210-219. Seibert, S. E., Silver, S. R., & Randolph, W. A. (2004). Taking empowerment to the next level: a multiple-level model of empowerment, performance, and satisfaction. Academy of Management Journal, 47(3), 332-349. Seibert, S. E., Wang, G., & Courtright, S. H. (2011). Antecedents and consequences of psychological and team empowerment in organizations: a meta-analytic review. Journal of Applied Psychology , 96(5), 981-1003. Simons, R. (1992). T e role of management control systems in creating competitive advantage: new perspectives. In Emmanuel, C., Otley, D., & Merchant, K. (Eds.). T e role of management control systems in creating competitive advantage: new perspectives (pp. 622-645). New York, NY: Springer. Spreitzer, G. M. (1995). Psychological empowerment in the workplace: dimensions, measurement, and validation. Academy of Management Journal, 38(5), 1442-1465. Spreitzer, G. M. (2008). Taking stock: a review of more than twenty years of research on empowerment at work. In Cooper, C., & Barlin J. (Orgs.). Handbook of organizational behavior (pp. 54-73). T ousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications. Spreitzer, G. M., Kizilos, M. A., & Nason, S. W. (1997). A dimensional analysis of the relationship between psychological empowerment and ef ectiveness satisfaction, and strain. Journal of Management, 23(5), 679-704. Tarrant, T., & Sabo, C. E. (2010). Role conf ict, role ambiguity, and job satisfaction in nurse executives. Nursing Administration Quarterly , 34(1), 72-82. T omas, K. W., & Velthouse, B. A. (1990). Cognitive elements of empowerment: an “interpretive” model of intrinsic task motivation. Academy of Management Review, 15(4), 666-681. Van Der Hauwaert, E., & Bruggeman, W. (2015). T e ef ect of monetary rewards on autonomous motivation in an enabling performance measurement context. Corporate Ownership & Control , 12(3), 341-356. Wang, G., & Lee, P. D. (2009). Psychological empowerment and job satisfaction: an analysis of interactive ef ects. Group & Organization Management, 34(3), 271-296. Widener, S. K. (2014). Researching the human side of management control: using survey-based methods. In Otley, D. T., & Soin, K. (Eds.). Management control and uncertainty (pp. 69-82). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan. Wouters, M., & Wilderom, C. (2008). Developing performance- measurement systems as enabling formalization: a longitudinal f eld study of a logistics department. Accounting, Organizations and Society, 33(4), 488-516. Wouters, M., & Roijmans, D. (2011). Using prototypes to induce experimentation and knowledge integration in the development of enabling accounting information. Contemporary Accounting Research , 28(2), 708-736. Yuliansyah, Y., & Khan, A. A. (2015). Strategic performance measurement system: a service sector and lower level employees empirical investigation. Corporate Ownership & Control , 12(3), 304-316. Copyright ofRevista Contabilidade &Finanças -USP isthe property ofRevista Contabilidade &Financas- USPanditscontent maynotbecopied oremailed tomultiple sites or posted toalistserv without thecopyright holder’sexpresswrittenpermission. However, users mayprint, download, oremail articles forindividual use.

Writerbay.net

We offer the best essay writing services to students who value great quality at a fair price. Let us exceed your expectations if you need help with this or a different assignment. Get your paper completed by a writing expert today. Nice to meet you! Want 15% OFF your first order? Use Promo Code: FIRST15. Place your order in a few easy steps. It will take you less than 5 minutes. Click one of the buttons below.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper