organizational behavior w7

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The case study (“What to do with Howard?” in the “Content” section on your course dashboard) will include a Synopsis and three Findings of Fact. Each Finding of Fact will require a justified recommended solution. Students should support their recommended solutions with rational thought learned from the course material, other courses, www resources provided for this course, and real-life experiences. The paper will be double-spaced and will not exceed 10 pages in length.


Findings should be 1-2 sentences identifying the issue you are going to correct in your recommendation.


You do not need restatements of case facts and definitions in the recommendations.  Go right to fixing the identified issue and build a full plan for change with all the details to put it in place.  You want to focus on the root issue causing the problem and correct it so it doesn’t happen again.  You want the recommendations to be the meat of the paper.

organizational behavior w7
What Do We Do with Howard? Agrigreen, Inc., manufactures various agricultural fertilizers in several plants in the western United States and Canada. Tad Pierson, appointed three months ago as a project engineer at one of the Agrigreen plants, had been told last week by Burt Jacobs, the new manager of engineering to whom he reports, that he was to take on the added responsibility of supervising the plant surveying group. Having worked with members of this group in the past, Pierson was aware of some performance problems and conflicts that existed within the group. Contemplating what action, if any, he should take as their new supervisor, he reviewed the history of the surveying group with others in the company (see Figure 1) and then talked with each group member individually to arrive at the following picture of the situation. FIGURE 1 Today — Tad Pierson faced with decision on the survey group. One week ago — Tad Pierson becomes supervisor of survey group. Burt Jacobs becomes engineering manager Lee Miller reassigned as project manager. Three months ago — Tad Pierson assigned as project engineer. Last 12 months — Tad Pierson & Mel Cutler work on pipeline project. 2 years ago — Mel Cutler works on 3 years ago a number of projects 4 years ago under the direction of Dan Richards. 5 years ago — Survey group moves to the Tech offices, ½ mile away. 6 years ago 7 years ago — Dan Richards & Mel Cutler stake mining claims in Nevada. 8 years ago — Frank Silverton becomes coordinator of survey group. 9 years ago — Lee Miller becomes engineering manager. — Paul Jackson becomes plant manager at another plant. 10 years ago — Mel Cutler joins the survey group. — Dan Richards transfers to manufacturing department. 11 years ago — Dan Richards is hired as a laborer in the plant. 12 years ago — Mel Cutler is hired as a laborer in the plant. 13 years ago 14 years ago 15 years ago — Paul Jackson becomes engineering manager. — Jerry Givens retires from the company. 16 years ago 17 years ago — Howard Lineberry hired as surveyor. 18 years ago — Jerry Givens is engineering manager. Howard Lineberry, Lead Surveyor After receiving his surveyor’s certificate from the local civil technologies college, Howard Lineberry had gone to work for the State Highway Department as a chainman. The job hadn’t paid very well, and he always felt that the lead surveyor didn’t like him and often had him doing work that was better suited for a rodman, a position of lower status than chainman on a survey crew. So, when a job for a lead surveyor had opened up at Agrigreen eighteen years ago, Lineberry had been glad to get it. He told Pierson how excited he had been to be hired into the newly created position. Previously, survey work at Agrigreen had been handled on a part-time basis by drafting personnel or project engineers, mainly Frank Silverton (see Figure 2). Because of significant growth during the preceding three years, survey work had begun to eat up nearly all of Silverton’s working hours. As a project engineer, his salary was too high to justify using him for survey activities, so management had decided to hire someone with an education in surveying and some experience to support the work of Silverton and the five other project engineers. FIGURE 2 Jerry Givens, manager of the engineering staff at the time, and since retired, was the man who had hired and first supervised Lineberry. Since being hired, he has worked for four different supervisors. He remembered Givens as a “cantankerous, hard-headed boss who had very specific things that he wanted done and definite ideas on how they should be accomplished.” VINCE ADAMS Surveyor MEL CUTLER Surveyor He often lost his temper and openly criticized Lineberry oranyone else doing something he didn’t like. Nevertheless, Lineberry felt that he got along well with Givens. He usually had Lineberry’s daily work scheduled by the time Lineberry arrived in the morning and explained what needed to be done and how it should be done. Only occasionally would Givens have to stop by during the day to change the focus of activities. After Givens retired, Lineberry reported to Paul Jackson, the new manager of engineering. Unlike Givens, Jackson expected Lineberry to plan his day based on the work that needed to be done and to go ahead and do it. About that time, Lineberry had been thinking that he could do a better job supporting the project engineers, who were increasingly busy on more and larger projects, if he worked with them more directly. The increased pace of work often resulted in last minute requests for Lineberry to provide information and field work. He felt that he had handled fairly well what had become frequent daily changes in his work schedule. Then one day Jackson accused Lineberry in front of a couple of the engineers, of being “disorganized and possibly lazy.” Later, maybe as a result of thinking about what Paul had said, or maybe as a result of just bad luck, according to Lineberry he made an error fixing the location of a building foundation. The error wasn’t noticed until it was time to erect the new mill. What followed, Lineberry remembered, was “pure hell as the foundation was demolished and replaced at considerable cost in time and money.” After that, people stopped talking when he walked up, and he often overheard “little biting comments” about him. Lineberry had “considered quitting, but good jobs were hard to get.” After the foundation incident, Jackson became increasingly critical and finally decided that Lineberry needed someone to assist him and double check his “error prone” work. At the same time, Agrigreen was planning to build a new wastewater holding pond, and the project would require extra surveying help. Jackson hired Dan Richards to assist Lineberry. Richards was a bright, hard-working young man who had the same training as Lineberry and who was also pursuing a degree in engineering. As the project proceeded, Richards had openly expressed his feelings that his leader, Howard Lineberry, was slow and stupid. Lineberry felt relieved a year and half later when Richards was transferred to the manufacturing department. Mel Cutler, who had been employed in the plant for two years as a laborer, replaced Richards. He had previously worked for another employer as a draftsman and had also gained considerable experience in surveying. Lineberry immediately liked Cutler, something he had never felt for Dan Richards. Cutler was willing to work with Lineberry on how to do the jobs and often caught small errors before they became problems. Ten years have passed since Cutler first joined Lineberry, who now felt a “slight pang” as he wished things were still the same between them. But, during the past five years, relations between them had become increasingly tense. Recently, the only verbal exchanges between them had been terse and directly concerned with the job. Much of the enjoyment of his job is gone, and Lineberry often dreaded coming to work. A few months after Cutler had been hired, another supervisory change occurred. Lee Miller, a former project engineer, took the manager’s job when Paul Jackson was promoted to plant manager at another Agrigreen plant. Miller had been very successful as an engineer but as a supervisor was somewhat indecisive. Meanwhile, increasing workloads had resulted in the hiring of additional draftsmen, and office space was getting tight. Miller corrected the situation by remodeling some space in the basement of the Tech offices located about a half-mile from the plant, and Lineberry and Cutler moved there. Nobody bothered either of them much in the new location. Lineberry felt good about the change because he now had space for the survey equipment and he was away from the mainstream of the operation. He needed to see the engineers only when he felt like it and wasn’t bothered as often by hearing their derogatory comments. Four years ago, Miller had told Lineberry and the other surveyors that he would like them to coordinate their job assignments and schedules through Frank Silverton, indicating that Silverton had much more surveying experience than he did and would know better what the needs were. Lineberry remembered feeling uncomfortable about this arrangement because Silverton wasn’t really his boss, and he still had to have Miller sign his time cards and approve his vacation. During the past four years, Cutler had occasionally worked on small projects outside the plant, most frequently for Dan Richards, who always specified which individual he wanted when requesting help. Recently, the company had constructed a fifty-mile pipeline to deliver raw material to the plant, and Cutler was chosen to work under Tad Pierson on that project. Pierson was a recent engineering graduate charged with overseeing the pipeline survey and construction, which had lasted from April through December the previous year. Lineberry still felt angry about Cutler’s assignment to the project because he has had “more experience than Mel at surveying and could have used the over-time money.” The only benefit to Lineberry resulting from Cutler’s outside work was that Miller had hired Vince Adams to help Lineberry during the summer months. Lineberry and Adams thought much the same way about many things, and Lineberry had a genuine affection for this “just-out-of-high school” young man. Following completion of the pipeline project, Tad Pierson had been made a project engineer, and because of the lack of space in the plant offices, was given space in the Tech offices near Lineberry Adams, and Cutler. Pierson was openly friendly with Cutler, but Lineberry felt that Pierson “acted coolly” toward him and Adams. They seemed to have nothing in common, and each time Lineberry had tried to talk to Pierson, Pierson seemed to cut the discussion short and make an excuse to leave. A week ago, Lee Miller had stepped down as manager of engineering and resumed duties as one of the project engineers. Burt Jacobs, a big, loud, direct person (in Lineberry’s opinion), who had been the manager of purchasing and stores (plant supplies) replaced him as manager. Jacobs was an engineer about half Miller’s age and several years younger than Lineberry. Only this morning, Jacobs had called the engineering department together to say that change was needed because of the friction between engineering and the other departments in the plant. He also said that the surveyors were now to report to Pierson (which made Lineberry very uneasy) and that anyone needing surveying services must now schedule it through Pierson. Mel Cutler, Surveyor’s Helper Mel Cutler arrived in town without a job and was a “happy man” when he got the call from Agrigreen. The company needed a plant laborer, and he needed a job. He remembered the job for the next two years as “the most exhausting and filthy job I have ever worked.” Finally, ten years ago a surveyor’s helper position had opened up, and with his background in surveying and drafting he was able to get the job. Cutler was assigned to Howard Lineberry. For the first few years, they worked well together. Both men had young families, and they shared many of the same outside interests. Cutler had been willing to go along with the way Lineberry had always done things until about five years ago when he noticed that they “experienced continual problems due to the way Howard kept his notes.” Cutler tried to show Lineberry the way he had been trained to keep notes, but “Howard would have nothing to do with it.” The debate continued for several weeks. Soon, Lineberry started keeping the work schedule to himself, and Cutler often had no idea what they were going to do next until Lineberry stopped the truck and started unloading equipment. In addition, Lineberry’s frequent snack breaks were starting to bother Cutler. He began losing respect for Lineberry and thought that Lineberry was “growing less concerned about his job.” No amount of criticism from Frank Silverton, their boss, seemed to have any effect on Lineberry or the number of errors he committed. Moving the surveyors out of the plant had been wrong in Cutler’s opinion. He said, “Howard started taking advantage of the situation almost immediately by coming in late and leaving early a couple of times each week.” Lately, Lineberry had been taking naps after lunch, justifying it by saying that he often worked late and was just making up the time. For the past year or so, he had been far more likely to be late for work than to be on time. Whenever Silverton mentioned it, Lineberry always had an excuse. Silverton gave up trying to get him to work on time and settled for just getting some good work done. Years ago, Dan Richards had first called to see if Cutler wanted to help him stake Agrigreen mining claims in Nevada, and Cutler had jumped at the chance. This turned out to be the first of many surveying expeditions that the two men made together. Looking back, Cutler could see how they had developed a “lot of respect and trust in each other’s work.” They often joked about Lineberry’s laziness and what an idiot they thought he was. Cutler had been extremely happy when he became part of the pipeline survey crew. He had met Tad Pierson, the pipeline field engineer, at a party that Richards had given and had immediately liked him. Shortly into the project, Pierson, on Richards’s recommendation, put Cutler in charge of the pipeline survey crew and made him responsible for inspections for the eastern half of the pipeline. Cutler felt good about the assignment and vowed that he would be “the best worker Tad had ever seen.” The hours were long–he had averaged more than thirty-five hours overtime a week for fifteen weeks straight and had never once complained. Pierson was also working long days, and Cutler felt that they had developed an unspoken respect for each other as solid, hard workers. Pierson had backed him without question when Cutler had ordered the contractor to dig up a quarter mile of pipeline that had been buried rather hastily while he had been gone from the work site. Cutler had felt, and later proved, that the contractor buried the pipe to prevent proper inspection. Cutler had talked with Pierson about Lineberry indicating he didn’t “look forward to working for him again when the pipeline is completed.” Later, after Pierson had been reassigned to the plant, Cutler regularly stopped by to talk with him, often pointing out some of the things that Lineberry and Adams were doing; Cutler and Pierson laughed and shook their heads. Cutler had been excited to hear at this morning’s meeting that Tad Pierson was now in charge of the surveyors. He wondered how long it would take Pierson to fire Howard. Tad Pierson, Project Engineer In reviewing his own career with Agrigreen, Tad Pierson had the following thoughts. I don’t know; I guess I’ve known Dan Richards since I was about fourteen or so. We used to pal around in high school and have always been dose. Dan told me he had wanted out of this area so badly because of Howard. He really hates the guy, and I guess I don’t have much respect for him either. It’s really ironic that now I’m Howard’s boss. Yeah, it was Dan that talked me into going back to school. When I was ready to give up as I’d done before, he told me, “You can always quit.” He knew it’d make me mad enough to stay. I guess I owe him for that. That, and his pulling the strings that got me on here. When I called him yesterday, to let him know about the change, he almost fell off his chair laughing. Then he stopped and said that he wished he was me so he could fire Howard. He was serious; he really hates him. I don’t know what I’m going to do. I think the company would be money ahead to fire Howard. But, I went through the firing thing with a guy on the pipeline crew last summer. With all the letters and documentation and stuff you have to go through, it’d take two years to get rid of him. When I think of how long he’s been here and his family and all, I get kind of squeamish. I guess I just don’t know what to do. I’m going to think on it some. When Burt asked me if I’d take the surveyors I told him I would, but not like Frank had. If I wanted to fire Howard, I wanted to be able to do it. He told me, “They’d be yours; just document it. I’m going to have my hands full trying to fix other messes without trying to handle that problem too.” I almost get the feeling that both of us are in up to our ears. With regard to Howard, about a month ago I went over to see Mel for a minute. There was Howard, with his head down on the drafting table, sound asleep. He didn’t even hear me come or go. Vince wasn’t any better, he was sitting there holding his hard hat and staring into it, dazed. I don’t know if he knew I was there or not either. What a pair! The pipeline was different. You knew it was just a summer thing, so we could put up with a lot of stuff. Mel’s a good man. He’s pretty sour on the company though. He doesn’t think Howard should get paid more than he does and “still get away with the crap he does.” He’s already told me I should fire both Howard and Vince. I just don’t know what to do. I talked with some of the engineers. Half of them don’t trust the work they get from Howard—they’d rather go out and do it themselves, and they do. I sometimes wonder what the heck we even have the surveyors for. I wonder what I should do? 8
organizational behavior w7
Okay, first things first. Let’s take a look at how you can develop your Findings of Facts and Recommendations. What I recommend you do is review the major OB concepts we discussed in the first eight chapters. Findings of Fact and their accompanying Recommendations are critical to a proper case study analysis. You will be required to submit three in each of your upcoming case studies. I don’t want to leave you hanging with just that information, though. Therefore, the following is a rather detailed explanation of what Findings of Fact and Recommendations are. For the purposes of this course a Finding of Fact is an Organizational Behavior (OB) concept or theme that is outlined in the readings. If you are doing the required reading in the text, OB issues should be clear to you. For example: During Chapter 2 we discussed ethics, business ethics and diversity. In the remaining chapters we studied individual differences, perception performance, motivation, rewards, stress and aggression. As you may recall, I had you looking for OB issues during your first assignment and the second discussion thread. Hint: List the OB issues as you come upon them in your reading and as you participate in the discussion threads and case studies. It will make it all clearer and easier for you as you progress through the course. I have also listed several of them for you on the overview for each week on the syllabus. List them by chapter for easier reference. Each of your Findings of Fact should relate to OB topics or themes. I don’t care about the price of tea in China, etc. Look for the OB issues. Taking the ideas directly from the text makes it easy to identify that, for example, there is stress within the organization. Question 2 of the Case Study of “Coleen Colombo and Colleagues Resist Mortgage Fraud” (pg. 250), asks, What influences on the stress experience appear to be present? This question gives you direction: stress plays a part in this Case Study. Use these clues from the chapters to help you identify OB issues in future cases. Your first Finding of Fact would look something like this: Finding of Fact # 1: Coleen and Sylvia are experiencing a great deal of stress as a result of turmoil at BNC. You will want to back that fact up with a couple of lines to support the fact. Explain what makes you believe that there is stress in the organization. Where in your Synopsis does this relate to the problem? Your first Recommendation should include mechanisms and processes to alleviate the stress within the organization as a whole. Using the information you’ve learned already, you know that perception, past experiences and a hostile work environment can influence stress (among many others). Your goal is to alleviate the problems that you identify by using those OB concepts and techniques that you already studied. Your second Finding of Fact might be: Finding of Fact # 2 Columbo is being harassed and bullied by the wholesaler because she reported him for bribery. (Yes, I know she was being sexually harassed by the same wholesaler. But don’t confuse the issues. Stick with one idea or concept.) Recommendation # 2 According to our text, and discussed in Chapter 2, harassment refers to verbal or physical conduct that denigrates or shows hostility toward an individual. That includes a person’s race, skin color, religion, gender, national origin, age or disability (Hellriegel, pg. 52). The wholesaler tried to bribe Colombo “to allow a loan with fraudulent information to go through.” Using the text’s information, as well as personal experience, it is your job to make recommendations to rectify the problem. As you can see from this example, the question at the end of the case (in the text) served as a springboard for the response. As you examine the case, look for other OB issues. Your responses should be detailed much more than mentioned above, and also to reflect other OB issues that relate to the case beyond those that I identified.
organizational behavior w7
THE SHIFTLESS WORKER? The Shiftless Worker?Charlie McManus, with a troubled look on his face, sat back in his chair and gazed out the window of his office past the plant to the surrounding mountains. It was a beautiful, sunny day, and he had hoped to be able to duck out by mid-afternoon and be somewhere far up Foster’s Creek by 4:30 or so. He would rather be worrying some brook trout instead of worrying about the implications of a situation developing out in Area 7.He could not quite put his finger on it, but there seemed to be something going on out there. Reports of the failure of operators to complete all the necessary checks on their shifts and some indications of minor grumblings among the work force had him wondering if everything was all right in the area. As the manager of Department B, he was thinking about whether or not he should try to get better information about what, if anything, was going on, and intervene in some way or just let things ride unless something more definite came up. He continued to review in his mind the company and the situation with which he was dealing. The CompanyLost River Processing, Inc., a wholly owned subsidiary plant of a large conglomerate, processes ore mined in the nearby mountains into an intermediate product serving as input material for a broad range of industrial processes. The plant’s production output is sold to other plants owned by the parent conglomerate, as well as to outside purchasers.The particular mineral business in which the company engages is highly competitive, with a number of strong competitors located around the country. Since the end product produced by all these plants has the basic characteristics of a commodity, it is important to strive to be a low-cost producer, especially under the current industry condition of overcapacity of production facilities. It is also important to maintain high quality standards because quality is a major factor in securing and maintaining highly sought sole-supplier relationships with customers, which are becoming more common in the industry.The plant, located in Ashley Springs, Wyoming (population 4,500), has been an institution in the community for over 40 years, employing approximately 500 workers in operations that continue around the clock. Most employees are from the surrounding rural, largely agricultural region. Many have grown up on farms and ranches in the area and still farm during their off time and on weekends. They tend to be a hard-working, independent, self-motivated work force in general, although there are some exceptions.The plant has been nonunion for many years, and remaining so is an important objective of management. The chief advantage of the nonunion status as viewed by management is their flexibility to make changes as needed and as technological developments demand, without protracted negotiations or costly concessions to a union. In seeking to continue its nonunion status, the company attempts to follow enlightened human resource practices and strives to maintain benefits and grant annual wage and salary increases comparable to those achieved by unions in directly competing firms in the area.The plant manager for the last several years has been a very capable, yet friendly, unassuming, down-to-earth individual who relates very well with and has the respect of the work force.For the past two or three years, the company has been cautiously restructuring its work force and adopting some new management practices in line with a decision to eliminate some layers of supervision and push decision-making farther down in the organization. These moves are one response to the need for continually reducing costs in order to remain competitive.Over the longer range, the plant is planning to move progressively toward an operation run on the concept of self-managed groups. Because the work force tends to have low turnover and be well trained and responsible, management feels this move is well founded and offers the potential for real savings.The plant organization is structured (as shown in Figure 1) with operators in each area responsible to shift supervisors, who in turn report to department managers. The various department managers report to the superintendent in their functional area, who reports to the plant manager, the highest position at the plant site. Area 7Area 7 is one of the processing areas falling under the supervision of the manager of Department B, Charlie McManus. The area is worked by several crews assigned to assure coverage on an around-the-clock basis. The crews on each shift report to a shift supervisor, and the crews and supervisors rotate shifts monthly.The supervisors are senior workers who have moved up to the position. Most have had eight or more years of experience in the plant before moving into their supervisory positions. As a result they are very knowledgeable about plant operations in their areas and also know all their fellow workers quite well.There were, however, a few exceptions to this internal progression from experienced worker to supervisor within the plant. The parent corporation had operated a similar plant in South Carolina for many years. Increasing pressures to lower costs, combined with overcapacity in the industry, made continued operation of the old plant uneconomic, and it was eventually closed a little over a year ago.When the plant was closed, some supervisors who were not able to take early retirement or move to other nearby plants were offered transfers to the Wyoming plant. Four eventually elected to transfer and had arrived at the plant about one year ago. They were then placed in supervisory positions roughly equivalent to the positions they had held in South Carolina. Three of them were assigned to Department B under Charlie McManus.These new supervisors from the East had worked in an environment quite different from the Ashley Springs plant, with a quite different work force. The South Carolina plant had employed a racially diverse work force of relatively uneducated, predominantly rural people and had a turnover rate that was moderate to high by Ashley Springs standards. These workers were not highly trained and their supervisors tended to manage them quite closely. As a result, these supervisors had learned to be quite directive and spent a fair amount of their time making sure that their workers did what they had been assigned. These supervisors had subsequently brought these supervisory tendencies and practices with them to the West. John Williams, SupervisorJohn Williams, who was among the transferred supervisors, is one of the shift supervisors in Area 7, responsible for several crews of operators involved in production work in that part of the plant. Among other duties, one of his crews is responsible for making sure that certain pumps are functioning properly, that several bins collecting by-products produced during the process are emptied on schedule, and that the work area is kept clean.John has been complaining to his manager Charlie, even asking for help on one occasion, that one of the operators on one of his crews, Mark Olson, has not been performing the job as well as John would like. Over the past several months, according to John, this worker has on occasion either simply failed to perform, or performed very poorly, several of his job responsibilities.For example, the settling pond pumps are supposed to be checked every four hours, and certain readings written down. John mentioned that when assigned to this task, Mark does not check them this often and often fails to record the readings as required.On the third shift, an operator is responsible for emptying the bins of coke and silica, which are produced as by-products, by performing a procedure called vactoring. On the second shift, the dryer bins are serviced in the same way. When assigned as the operator on these shift, Mark reportedly often fails to place the appropriate bins as they should be.Part of each operator’s assigned responsibility is a clean-up area. As the supervisor, John usually has to call Mark’s attention to his clean-up area before the monthly inspection.John reported he has tried talking with Mark about his performance several times, but it hasn’t seemed to make any difference. He recognizes that Mark is one of the more intelligent employees among his crew of operators. As such, John is certain Mark is capable of performing well, if he chooses to do the job right. John expressed his concern to Charlie that Mark “always seems to find new ways to screw up on and just seems to forget to do certain aspects of his job assignments.”John indicated that Mark had also told him during one of the talks they have had that he doesn’t really like his job very much and has been looking around for either a transfer within the plant or for some other opportunity outside the company. Mark OlsonAs he tried to keep track of all employees in his department, Charlie had been following Mark Olson’s progress with the company since he was hired. Mark had been working for the company for several years, and by most indications, it seemed to Charlie, it had generally been a good experience for him. In the course of their infrequent, informal chats, Mark had never given Charlie any indication that he was dissatisfied with his job, and until recently, his performance had always been rated quite highly. The job has no doubt become somewhat routine for Mark now that he has learned all the tasks performed by the crew, and shift work is not particularly enjoyable. These are conditions however, that everybody comes to terms with eventually. At the same time, the pay, the working conditions, and the company are pretty good.One thing that has been bothering Mark–and some others, according to scuttlebutt Charlie has picked up in the department–has been the attitude of the new supervisors the company transferred in from back East. The crews’ attitude is that these new people seem to have taken over the department, and all the day-to-day operations are being run by these “out of towners.” “They treat us like a bunch of slaves, don’t let us make decisions, and treat us like we’re stupid” was one comment overheard in the shower room a few weeks ago.Mark appeared to Charlie to be one example of an operator who has not been performing the job as well as he is capable of doing, perhaps partly in response to the attitude of these supervisors. Over the past several months, according to his supervisor, Mark has on occasion simply failed to perform, or performed poorly, several of his job responsibilities. Mark admitted to a friend, who mentioned it to Charlie, that he purposely chose random tasks to “forget” to do. “I’m acting like this to drive them crazy, and just waiting for a job bid,” Mark told his friend in the human resource department.Charlie ended his reverie and arose from the chair. He was still not sure if he was dealing with any real issue or just the usual griping and interpersonal problems heard among the crews. Still, these problems and comments seemed to be arising more frequently than before in Department B. He was concerned about young Mark Olson, for whom he had great hopes in the company.Charlie wondered what should be done about the situation. In line with the downward delegation of authority in the plant, he generally did not intervene in cases of problem employees, but rather left resolution of such situations up to his supervisors. But in this case, he wondered if the supervisor might be part of the problem. He wasn’t sure of just what he was dealing with here and didn’t know if he should intervene in some way or not.It was now 4:00, and Charlie headed out the door for the parking lot and his waiting pickup, gassed up and ready to go with his fly rod and some new Montana nymphs he was itching to try. He had decided to put in some good thinking time before tomorrow, when he would return with his decision.

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