PSY7864 WEEK 1-10 DISCUSSIONS AND ASSIGNMENTS

Week 1

 

  • The Basics of Data Collection and Analysis

     

    Why Study Statistics?

    There are many reasons to take a statistics course (besides the fact that it is required). Statistics help researchers answer interesting questions, build knowledge, and move their disciplines forward. As a professional, you also need to be an educated consumer of statistics so you can understand the literature of your field. Studying statistics will also sharpen your critical thinking skills. Studying statistics requires you to think logically, examine assumptions, calculate the probability of events, make inferences, and evaluate outcomes. These are all skills that will serve you well in your professional life.

    TO DO LIST:

    • Discussion: Get to know you and statistics.
    • Quiz: Check your knowledge of descriptive statistics.
    • What You Need To Know: Understand the quantitative research approach.
    • Prepare: Understand Yellowdig.
    • Prepare: Install SPSS to get yourself ready for analyses.
  • Discussion Overview

     

    Each discussion in this course has three to four options that may apply readings, use new skills, ask you to identify additional outside sources, reflect on how content applies to you, or give you an opportunity to talk about what interests you most. You will choose one option to respond to each week.

  • Assignment Overview

     

    There is no assignment this week, but there is plenty to do. Please focus on your readings, review the 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF], take the quiz, and get SPSS installed.

  • What You Need to Know

     

    Readings

    Read about the basics of statistics and how researchers approach important research questions.

    • Field, A. (2018). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS: North American edition (5th ed.). Sage.
      • Chapter 1 describes the research process and how statistics can be used to explore questions of interest.
      • Chapter 2 describes statistical models and what they all have in common.
    • The 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] highlights content to focus on as you read and absorb the materials. You may also find some additional articles with direct relevance to your field here.
  • Prepare: Introducing Yellowdig

     

    This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate course discussions. Yellowdig provides an interface that resembles modern and familiar social media platforms and makes it easier to post and respond to discussions. It also makes posting media within your discussions simpler.

    A Yellowdig account will be automatically created for you. The first time you access a Yellowdig discussion, you will be asked to acknowledge and confirm your account. For more on how this course uses Yellowdig, visit the Tools and Resources section of this course, available in the left-hand menu. Note: You will have the best experience using Yellowdig with Chrome.

    To learn more about how this course uses Yellowdig, visit the Yellowdig Forums page on Campus.

    If you have trouble getting connected to the Yellowdig discussion boards, contact Capella Technical Support.

    Grading in Yellowdig

    Yellowdig uses a unique discussion points grading system. In this course, points will initially be given as follows:

    • Initial post of 50 or more words: 40 points.
    • Comment (response) of 30 or more words on another learner’s post: 40 points.

    Your final grade will be based on the total number of points you have earned throughout the course. You can earn up to a maximum of 1,000 points, for a final discussion participation grade of 100%.

    Checking Your Progress

    To help you stay on track, Yellowdig calculates how many points you should try to earn per week to ensure you end the course with a top grade. You can find this information by clicking the points dashboard area of Yellowdig (on the left-hand menu within the tool).

    Your participation grade in your classroom My Grades area will be periodically updated by Yellowdig throughout the day. Each week it will account for the points you could accumulate that week, as well as the points you already have. So, do not be surprised if your grade changes; you’ll get used to the pattern in a few weeks.

    Instead, focus on the points displayed in Yellowdig. If you are hitting your maximum points each week, you are good. In fact, you are more than good! Aim for 100 to 120 points each week to stay on track.

    Using Yellowdig

    Yellowdig is designed to take a less formal approach to discussing course content. Think of it as a playground for ideas. We still expect you to use APA style for citations and references. However, we want you to focus on shorter, more succinct posts on the content rather than writing short essays. Try to start a conversation on the new topics you learn each week. Also share additional resources with one another to help better understand and explore the new ideas you’ll learn.

    This is an environment designed to give you flexibility and control. Take advantage of that to learn in the manner best suited to you.

    Yellowdig Features
    • You can like or love each other’s posts.
    • You can use hashtags.
    • You can filter what you see (icon on the top of the screen).
    • You can use the sort function (icon on the top of the screen) to control the order of the posts.
    • Weekly points (on the left) will tell you how many points you’ve earned that week. Aim for 100 to 120 points each week to stay on track.
    • You can embed outside resources like video, pictures, and links.
    • You can create polls or videos from within your post while you are writing it.
  • Prepare: SPSS Procurement and Preparedness

     

    In this course, you will be using SPSS software. Refer to the Statistical Software page on Campus for general information on SPSS software (including the most recent version made available to Capella learners) and expectations for initial procurement as a Capella learner.

    Make sure that your SPSS software is downloaded and installed with fully activated licensing on your computer and running properly within your operating system (PC or Mac). If you need help with these steps, refer to the SPSS Installation Helper.

  • Write Your Discussion Post

    This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate our course discussions.

    Yellowdig features include:

    • Modern and intuitive collaborative interface
    • The ability to respond and participate in discussions via email
    • Better integration of media
    • Unique discussion points rating system

    Your Yellowdig account will be automatically created. However, first time you visit Yellowdig you will be asked to acknowledge and confirm your account.

    For more on how this course uses Yellowdig, visit the Tools and Resources page in this course, available in the left menu.

    Detailed information and how-to documents about Yellowdig are available at the Yellowdig page on Campus.

    Discussion

    Write Your Discussion Post

    This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate discussions. If you have not yet read the Prepare: Introducing Yellowdig study in this unit, read that now to learn what Yellowdig is and how to use it. The following resources will be provided in every Yellowdig discussion in this course for on-the-spot help using Yellowdig and understanding how grading in Yellowdig works.

    Discussion Question

    Having some anxiety about this class is common. Some people like numbers, and others are somewhat intimidated by them. But understanding statistics is about more than numbers. Statistics allows you to test hypotheses and gain important information about the world.

    Please post something to the discussion board related to the content covered this week. Do not create your post as a reply to the pinned post. Instead, use Yellowdig’s Create option to create a new post. Label your post with the hashtag for the week (#Week1) so that others can sort posts by the week’s topic.

    Here are some ideas for your post to get you started:

    • What is your experience with statistics and how is your anxiety level heading into this class? Give your post a hashtag in the body (e.g., #statsstress).
    • Which outside resource (image, video, article, self-recording) speaks to what you’re feeling about statistics and this course? Share the link within your post. Why did you pick that item to share?
    • What about this week’s content is relevant to your own professional or academic career?

    Response Guidelines

    As you respond to your classmates, share your experiences and anecdotal feedback regarding their posts. How have your personal experiences resonated with their ideas? What can you add to their ideas, building on the connections you have made to the material so far? Consider exploring the features of Yellowdig, such as your ability to embed videos and pictures, create polls and videos, use hashtags, love or like a post, and so on.

    GO TO YELLOWDIG DISCUSSION BOARD

  •  

    Take the Quiz

    After completing this week’s readings, take the quiz to test your understanding of some basics of statistics. Please carefully read the following instructions before beginning the quiz:

    • You must complete and submit the quiz by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. central time.
    • You may take the quiz three times. Do not open and close the quiz to return to it later as this will end the quiz session.
    • This quiz is not timed, but once you submit the quiz, you may not go back and change any of your responses.
    • Your score is automatically recorded in the instructor’s grade book upon completion of the quiz.
    • Your score and the correct answers will be accessible to you after you have completed the quiz and your score is recorded.
    • This quiz is worth 3 percent of your overall grade for the course. There are 10 questions worth 10 points each for a total of 100 possible points.

    Click the linked quiz title to access the quiz. If you have any issues with the quiz, contact your instructor.

    Week 2

     

    • Exploring SPSS and Descriptive Statistics

       

      Creating a Picture of Your Data

      Imagine you’re leading a project for the Office of Learner Affairs at an online university that is interested in learner success. You want to start with the basics. When examining learners’ work, you might want to explore things like what the average grades were in particular classes and how spread out those grades were. This could provide some interesting information. If everyone failed, it may mean that the tests were too hard or the instructors had not explained the concepts well to the learners. A wider spread would indicate more varied levels of understanding, studying, and so forth. You could also find out what the makeup of the classes is. Are the learners male or female? How many of them are older, nontraditional learners? How many learners work full time in addition to their coursework? This context might help guide teaching approaches. Running descriptive statistics will allow you to get a good picture of the data.

      TO DO LIST:

      • Discussion: Choose one option to respond to this week.
      • Assignment: Run descriptive statistics in SPSS.
      • What You Need To Know: Understand the basics of SPSS and descriptive statistics.
    • Discussion Overview

       

      Each discussion in this course has three to four options that may apply readings, use new skills, ask you to identify additional outside sources, reflect on how content applies to you, or give you an opportunity to talk about what interests you most. You will choose one option to respond to each week.

    • Assignment Overview

       

      In this week’s assignment, you will have a chance to start using SPSS, so you’ll want to get that installed if you haven’t already. You’ll get some practice running some simple descriptive statistics and navigating the program. Your readings and the 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] will help you in your efforts.

    • What You Need to Know

       

      Readings

      Read about visual data and descriptive statistics.

      • Field, A. (2018). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS: North American edition (5th ed.). Sage.
        • Chapter 5 describes how you can explore and learn about data with graphs.
      • George, D., & Mallery, P. (2019). IBM SPSS statistics 25 step by step: A simple guide and reference (15th ed.). Routledge.
        • Chapters 5–7 describe the use of graphs, frequencies, and descriptive statistics.
      • The 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] highlights content to focus on as you read and absorb the materials. You may also find some additional articles with direct relevance to your field here.

      Descriptive Statistics

      Descriptive statistics are just what they sound like, statistics that allow you to describe or summarize the data with regard to such things as their distribution and their spread. Descriptive statistics provide you with a picture of your data, while inferential statistics (which we will discuss in subsequent weeks) allow you to draw conclusions about relationships between variables and/or differences between groups.

    • Prepare: SPSS Procurement and Preparedness

      PREPARE: SPSS PROCUREMENT AND PREPAREDNESS

      In this course, you will be using SPSS software. Refer to the Statistical Software page on Campus for general information on SPSS software (including the most recent version made available to Capella learners) and expectations for initial procurement as a Capella learner.

      Make sure that your SPSS software is downloaded and installed with fully activated licensing on your computer and running properly within your operating system (PC or Mac). If you need help with these steps, refer to the SPSS Installation Helper.

    • Assignment Instructions

      DESCRIPTIVE STATISTICS

      Your first IBM SPSS assignment includes two sections in which you will do the following:

      • Create two histograms.
      • Calculate measures of central tendency and dispersion.

      This will give you some experience with the data set.

      Key Details and Instructions

      The grades.sav file is a sample SPSS data set. The data represent a teacher’s recording of student demographics and performance on quizzes and a final exam. This week, you will create and describe two histograms and a descriptives table using these data.

      Part 1

      Create two histograms for visual interpretation using the following variables:

      SPSS Variable Definition
      Gender female =1; male =2
      Final final exam: number of correct answers

      Create two histograms and paste them into your Word document:

      • A histogram for male students.
      • A histogram for female students.

      Briefly describe what a visual inspection of this output tells you about the nature of the curves.

      Part 2

      Create a descriptives table to assess measures of central tendency and dispersion using the following variables:

      SPSS Variable Definition
      GPA Previous grade point average
      Quiz3 Quiz 3: number of correct answers
      • Create a descriptives table and paste it into your Word document.
      • Report the mean, standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis for GPA and quiz3.
      • Briefly describe what skewness and kurtosis tell you about these data with regard to normality.

      Submit both sections of your assignment as an attached Word document.

      SCORING GUIDE

      Your Work will be evaluated using this criteria.

      VIEW SCORING GUIDE

      Competencies Measured

      By successfully completing this assignment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the following course competencies and assignment criteria:

      • Competency 1Analyze the computation, application, strengths, and limitations of various statistical tests.
      • Provide accurate interpretation of histograms for males and females.
      • Provide accurate interpretation of measures of central tendencies.
      • Competency 5Apply a statistical program’s procedure to data.
        • Provide histograms for males and females.
        • Provide measures of central tendencies.

      SUBMIT YOUR ASSIGNMENT

    • Write Your Discussion Post

      This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate discussions. If you have not yet read the Prepare: Introducing Yellowdig study in the first unit, read that now to learn what Yellowdig is and how to use it. The following resources will be provided in every Yellowdig discussion in this course for on-the-spot help using Yellowdig and understanding how grading in Yellowdig works.

      Discussion Question

      We use statistics all the time to drive decisions, evaluate outcomes, and determine where to invest.

      Please post something to the discussion board related to the content covered this week. Do not create your post as a reply to the pinned post. Instead, use Yellowdig’s Create option to create a new post. Label your post with the hashtag for the week (#Week2) so that others can sort posts by the week’s topic.

      Here are some ideas for your post to get you started:

      • How have you seen or used statistics yourself in your workplace? Give your post a hashtag in the body (e.g., #reallifestats).
      • Which outside resource (image, video, article, self-recording) best reflects what your own experience with statistics has been? Share the link within your post. Why did you pick that item to share?
      • What about this week’s content is relevant to your own professional or academic career?

      Response Guidelines

      As you respond to your classmates, share your experiences and anecdotal feedback regarding their posts. How have your personal experiences resonated with their ideas? What can you add to their ideas, building on the connections you have made to the material so far? Consider exploring the features of Yellowdig, such as your ability to embed videos and pictures, create polls and videos, use hashtags, love or like a post, and so on.

      Week 3

       

      • Correlation Introduction

         

        The Nature of Association

        Exploring the associations between some variables in the courseroom using correlations might provide some important information about learner success. You’ll need to pay attention to both magnitude, which is the strength of the association, and directionality, which is the direction (positive or negative) of the association. This week, you’ll start learning about how best to approach correlational analyses like these and start getting some answers. Next week, you’ll start running some statistics of your own.

        TO DO LIST:

        • Discussion: Choose one option to respond to this week.
        • Quiz: Check your knowledge of correlation.
        • What You Need To Know: Understand the basics of correlation.
        • Plan: Get a head start on your data analysis for next week’s assignment.
      • Discussion Overview

         

        Each discussion in this course has three to four options that may apply readings, use new skills, ask you to identify additional outside sources, reflect on how content applies to you, or give you an opportunity to talk about what interests you most. You will choose one option to respond to each week.

      • Assignment Overview

         

        There is no assignment this week, so focus on your readings, review the 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF], and take the quiz.

      • What You Need to Know

         

        Readings

        Read about statistical assumptions, sources of bias, and the basics of correlation.

        • Field, A. (2018). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS: North American edition (5th ed.). Sage.
          • Chapter 6 describes statistical assumptions and potential sources of bias.
          • Chapter 8 will introduce you to correlations.
        • The 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] highlights content to focus on as you read and absorb the materials. You may also find some additional articles with direct relevance to your field here.

        Inferential Statistics

        Inferential statistics allow us to generalize about larger populations by examining a small sample of it. They allow us to test hypotheses and draw meaningful conclusions.

      • Plan: Week 4 Assignment Preparation

         

        This week’s work provides context for an upcoming assignment on correlations in Week 4, in which you’ll get a chance to use SPSS again. Doing anything for the first time takes a little longer. If you are new to SPSS, it’s a good idea to get a head start. Completing the assignment may take more time than you think. Consider starting your data analysis. Please let your instructor know if you have any problems or questions about SPSS.

        The following resources may be helpful:

      • Write Your Discussion Post

        This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate discussions. If you have not yet read the Prepare: Introducing Yellowdig study in the first unit, read that now to learn what Yellowdig is and how to use it. The following resources will be provided in every Yellowdig discussion in this course for on-the-spot help using Yellowdig and understanding how grading in Yellowdig works.

        Discussion Question

        This week is about spurious correlations. Check out these real-life examples: Spurious Correlations.

        Please post something to the discussion board related to the content covered this week. Do not create your post as a reply to the pinned post. Instead, use Yellowdig’s Create option to create a new post. Label your post with the hashtag for the week (#Week3) so that others can sort posts by the week’s topic.

        Here are some ideas for your post to get you started:

        • After looking at examples of Spurious Correlations, answer the question, Why do you need to be cautious when interpreting correlations? Give your post a hashtag (e.g., #Pinocchiostats).
        • Which outside resource (image, video, article) gives a great example of spurious correlations “in the wild”? Share the link within your post. What struck you most about this example?
        • What about this week’s content is relevant to your own professional or academic career?

        Response Guidelines

        As you respond to your classmates, share your experiences and anecdotal feedback regarding their posts. How have your personal experiences resonated with their ideas? What can you add to their ideas, building upon the connections you have made to the material so far? Consider exploring the features of Yellowdig such as your ability to embed videos and pictures, create polls and videos, use hashtags, love or like a post, and so on.

        GO TO YELLOWDIG DISCUSSION BOARD

      • Take the Quiz

        After completing this week’s readings, take the quiz to test your understanding of correlation. Please carefully read the following instructions before beginning the quiz:

        • You must complete and submit the quiz by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. central time.
        • You may take the quiz three times. Do not open and close the quiz to return to it later as this will end the quiz session.
        • This quiz is not timed, but once you submit the quiz, you may not go back and change any of your responses.
        • Your score is automatically recorded in the instructor’s grade book upon completion of the quiz.
        • Your score and the correct answers will be accessible to you after you have completed the quiz and your score is recorded.
        • This quiz is worth 3 percent of your overall grade for the course. There are 10 questions worth 10 points each for a total of 100 possible points.

        Click the linked quiz title to access the quiz. If you have any issues with the quiz, contact your instructor.

        Week 4

         

        • Correlation Application

           

          Time to Jump In

          It’s finally time to start running some analyses! This week, you’ll begin to explore the relationships that may or may not exist in your courseroom data.

          TO DO LIST:

          • Discussion: Choose one option to respond to this week.
          • Assignment: Run and interpret a correlational analysis in SPSS.
          • What You Need To Know: Understand how to run and interpret a correlation analysis.
        • Discussion Overview

           

          Each discussion in this course has three to four options that may apply readings, use new skills, ask you to identify additional outside sources, reflect on how content applies to you, or give you an opportunity to talk about what interests you most. You will choose one option to respond to each week.

        • Assignment Overview

           

          In this week’s assignment, you’ll get a chance to run and interpret your first inferential statistics analysis, correlations. Your readings and the 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] will help you in your efforts.

        • What You Need to Know

           

          Readings

          Read about how to apply your knowledge of correlation and run some analyses in SPSS.

          • George, D., & Mallery, P. (2019). IBM SPSS statistics 25 step by step: A simple guide and reference (15th ed.). Routledge.
            • Chapter 10 describes how to run a bivariate correlational analysis in SPSS.
          • Field, A. (2018). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS: North American edition (5th ed.). Sage.
            • Review Chapter 8’s information on assumptions and effect sizes to help you with your assignment.
          • The 7864 Course Study guide [PDF] highlights content to focus on as you read and absorb the materials. You may also find some additional articles with direct relevance to your field here.

          SPSS Data Set Correlation

          This week, you will apply your understanding of correlation to the SPSS data set.

        • Assignment Instructions

          CORRELATION APPLICATION AND INTERPRETATION

          Instructions

          Complete the following for this assignment:

          The grades.sav file is a sample SPSS data set. The data represent a teacher’s recording of student demographics and performance on quizzes and a final exam across three sections of the course. Each section consists of 35 students (N = 105). There are 21 variables in grades.sav.

          This week’s assignment is on correlations. You will analyze the following variables in the grades.sav data set:

          SPSS Variable Definition
          Quiz1 Quiz 1: number of correct answers
          GPA Previous grade point average
          Total Total number of points earned in class
          Final Final exam: number of correct answers
          Step 1: Write Section 1 of the DAA: The Data Analysis Plan
          • Name the four variables used in this analysis and whether they are categorical or continuous.
          • State a research question, null hypothesis, and alternate hypothesis for one X-Y pair. For example, you could articulate a research question, null hypothesis, and alternate hypothesis for quiz1 (X) and final (Y).
          Step 2: Write Section 2 of the DAA: Testing Assumptions

          Test for one of the assumptions of correlation – normality.

          • Create a descriptive statistics table in SPSS to assess normality. This table should include the four variables named above.
          • Paste the table in the DAA.
          • Interpret the skewness and kurtosis values and how you determined whether the assumption of normality was met or violated.
          Step 3: Write Section 3 of the DAA: Results and Interpretation
          • Paste the intercorrelation matrix (SPSS Correlation table) for the four variables into the document.
          • First, report the lowest magnitude correlation in the intercorrelation matrix, including degrees of freedom, correlation coefficient, and p value.
            • Specify whether or not to reject the null hypothesis for this correlation.
          • Second, report the highest magnitude correlation in the intercorrelation matrix, including degrees of freedom, correlation coefficient, and p value.
            • Specify whether or not to reject the null hypothesis for this correlation.
          Step 4: Write Section 4 of the DAA: Statistical Conclusions
          • Provide a brief summary of your analysis and the conclusions drawn about correlations.
          • Analyze the limitations of the statistical test and/or possible alternative explanations for your results.
          Step 5: Write Section 5 of the DAA: Application

          Analyze how you might use correlations in your field of study.

          • Name an independent variable and dependent variable that would work for such an analysis and why studying it may be important to the field or practice.

          Submit your DAA template as an attached Word document in the assignment area.

          SCORING GUIDE

          Your Work will be evaluated using this criteria.

          VIEW SCORING GUIDE

          Competencies Measured

          By successfully completing this assignment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the following course competencies and assignment criteria:

          • Competency 1: Analyze the computation, application, strengths, and limitations of various statistical tests.
            • Analyze statistical assumptions.
          • Competency 2: Analyze the decision-making process of data analysis.
            • Articulate the data analysis plan.
          • Competency 3: Apply knowledge of hypothesis testing.
            • Interpret statistical results and hypotheses.
          • Competency 4: Interpret the results of statistical analyses.
            • Explain statistical conclusions, the limitations of the test, and possible alternative explanations.
          • Competency 6: Apply the results of statistical analyses (your own or others) to your field of interest or career.
            • Analyze the potential applications of the test in the field and their implications.
          • Competency 7: Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with the expectations for members in the identified field of study.
            • Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and adheres to APA style and formatting.

          SUBMIT YOUR ASSIGNMENT

        • Write Your Discussion Post

          This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate discussions. If you have not yet read the Prepare: Introducing Yellowdig study in the first unit, read that now to learn what Yellowdig is and how to use it. The following resources will be provided in every Yellowdig discussion in this course for on-the-spot help using Yellowdig and understanding how grading in Yellowdig works.

          Discussion Question

          Though numbers are thought to be less subjective than words and feelings, they still can be skewed when interpreted.

          Please post something to the discussion board related to the content covered this week. Do not create your post as a reply to the pinned post. Instead, use Yellowdig’s Create option to create a new post. Label your post with the hashtag for the week (#Week4) so that others can sort posts by the week’s topic.

          Here are some ideas for your post to get you started:

          • What role does researcher bias play in the interpretation of analyses? Why is this an ethical concern for researchers and is there any way around it? Give your post a hashtag (e.g., #statsskew).
          • Which outside resource (image, video, article) gives a great example of researcher bias? Share the link within your post. What struck you most about this example?
          • What about this week’s content is relevant to your own professional or academic career?

          Response Guidelines

          As you respond to your classmates, share your experiences and anecdotal feedback regarding their posts. How have your personal experiences resonated with their ideas? What can you add to their ideas, building on the connections you have made to the material so far? Consider exploring the features of Yellowdig, such as your ability to embed videos and pictures, create polls and videos, use hashtags, love or like a post, and so on.

          Week 5

           

          • t-Test Introduction

             

            Group Differences

            Imagine you want to explore potential differences in groups of learners. t tests are an excellent way to examine potential differences between two groups, like men and women, or to look at scores before and after some type of intervention. This can be another good source of information about learner success.

            TO DO LIST:

            • Discussion: Choose one option to respond to this week.
            • Quiz: Check your knowledge of tests.
            • What You Need To Know: Understand the basics of tests.
            • Plan: Get a head start on your data analysis for next week’s assignment.
          • Discussion Overview

             

            Each discussion in this course has three to four options that may apply readings, use new skills, ask you to identify additional outside sources, reflect on how content applies to you, or give you an opportunity to talk about what interests you most. You will choose one option to respond to each week.

          • Assignment Overview

             

            There is no assignment this week, so focus on your readings, review the 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF], and take the quiz.

          • What You Need to Know

             

            Readings

            Read about the basics of t tests.

            • Field, A. (2018). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS: North American edition (5th ed.). Sage.
              • Chapter 10 describes the basics of t tests.
            • The 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] highlights content to focus on as you read and absorb the materials. You may also find some additional articles with direct relevance to your field here

            Basic Inferential Statistics

            Weeks 5 and 6 review the theory, logic, and application of t tests. The t test is a basic inferential statistic that allows you to compare the means of two groups to see if they are significantly different.

          • Plan: Week 6 Assignment Preparation

             

            This week’s work provides context for an upcoming assignment on correlations in Week 6, in which you’ll get a chance to use SPSS again. Doing anything for the first time takes a little longer. If you are new to SPSS or t tests, it’s a good idea to get a head start. Completing the assignment may take more time than you think. Consider starting your data analysis. Please let your instructor know if you have any problems or questions about SPSS.

            The following resources may be helpful:

          • Write Your Discussion Post

            This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate discussions. If you have not yet read the Prepare: Introducing Yellowdig study in the first unit, read that now to learn what Yellowdig is and how to use it. The following resources will be provided in every Yellowdig discussion in this course for on-the-spot help using Yellowdig and understanding how grading in Yellowdig works.

            Discussion Question

            This week is all about proverbial apples and oranges.

            Please post something to the discussion board related to the content covered this week. Do not create your post as a reply to the pinned post. Instead, use Yellowdig’s Create option to create a new post. Label your post with the hashtag for the week (#Week5) so that others can sort posts by the week’s topic.

            Here are some ideas for your post to get you started:

            • Why can’t you compare apples to oranges? Why would it be important to match your intervention and control groups on certain characteristics in a research study to help with interpretation of the results? Give your post a hashtag in the body (e.g., #applestoranges).
            • Which outside resource (image, video, article) shows the danger of mismatched research methodology and data interpretation? Share the link within your post. What effect might this dissonance have on the impact of the research and its subject?
            • What about this week’s content is relevant to your own professional or academic career?

            Response Guidelines

            As you respond to your classmates, share your experiences and anecdotal feedback regarding their posts. How have your personal experiences resonated with their ideas? What can you add to their ideas, building on the connections you have made to the material so far? Consider exploring the features of Yellowdig, such as your ability to embed videos and pictures, create polls and videos, use hashtags, love or like a post, and so on.

            GO TO YELLOWDIG DISCUSSION BOARD

          • Take the Quiz

            After completing this week’s readings, take the quiz to test your understanding of t-Test Application. Please carefully read the following instructions before beginning the quiz:

            • You must complete and submit the quiz by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. Central Time.
            • You may take the quiz three times. Do not open and close the quiz to return to it later as this will end the quiz session.
            • This quiz is not timed, but once you submit the quiz, you may not go back and change any of your responses.
            • Your score is automatically recorded in the instructor’s grade book upon completion of the quiz.
            • Your score and the correct answers will be accessible to you after you have completed the quiz and your score is recorded.
            • This quiz is worth 3 percent of your overall grade for the course. There are 5 questions worth 20 points each for a total of 100 possible points.

            To begin, click the linked quiz title to access the quiz. If you have any issues with the quiz, contact your instructor.

            Week 6

             

            • t-Test Application

               

              Looking for Differences

              This week, you’ll begin to explore mean group differences in your courseroom data. Is it possible that being in a particular group results in higher or lower mean achievement levels? You’re going to explore gender differences and overall learner GPA. Let’s find out if there’s a difference!

              TO DO LIST:

              • Discussion: Choose one option to respond to this week.
              • Assignment: Run and interpret a t test in SPSS.
              • What You Need To Know: Understand how to run and interpret a test.
            • Discussion Overview

               

              Each discussion in this course has three to four options that may apply readings, use new skills, ask you to identify additional outside sources, reflect on how content applies to you, or give you an opportunity to talk about what interests you most. You will choose one option to respond to each week.

            • Assignment Overview

               

              This week, you’ll run and interpret a t test. Your readings and the 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] will help you in your efforts.

            • What You Need to Know

               

              Readings

              Read about how to apply your knowledge of t tests and run some analyses in SPSS.

              • George, D., & Mallery, P. (2019). IBM SPSS statistics 25 step by step: A simple guide and reference (15th ed.). Routledge.
                • Chapter 11 describes how to run a t test in SPSS.
              • Field, A. (2018). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS: North American edition (5th ed.). Sage.
                • Review Chapter 10’s information on t test assumptions and comparing independent means to help you with your assignment.
              • The 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] highlights content to focus on as you read and absorb the materials. You may also find some additional articles with direct relevance to your field here.

              t Test Application

              This week, you will apply your understanding of the t test to the SPSS data set.

            • Assignment Instructions

              T-TEST APPLICATION AND INTERPRETATION

              Instructions

              Complete the following for this assignment:

              The grades.sav file is a sample SPSS data set. The data represent a teacher’s recording of student demographics and performance on quizzes and a final exam across three sections of the course. Each section consists of 35 students (N = 105). There are 21 variables in grades.sav.

              This week’s assignment is on t-tests. You will analyze the following variables in the grades.sav data set:

              SPSS Variable Definition
              Gender female = 1; male = 2
              GPA previous grade point average
              Step 1: Write Section 1 of the DAA: The Data Analysis Plan
              • Name the variables used in this analysis and whether they are categorical or continuous.
              • State a research question, null hypothesis, and alternate hypothesis for the independent samples t-test.
              Step 2: Write Section 2 of the DAA: Testing Assumptions

              Test for one of the assumptions of t-tests – homogeneity of variance.

              • Create SPSS output showing the Levene’s Test for Equality Variances. Run the Levene’s test on the dependent variable test for the entire sample. Do not split the data up by gender before running the homogeneity test.
              • Paste the table in the DAA.
              • Interpret the Levene’s test.
              Step 3: Write Section 3 of the DAA: Results and Interpretation

              Paste the SPSS output of the test. Below the output:

              • Report the means and standard deviations for each group.
              • State the results of the t-test using the “Assume equal variances” row.
              • Interpret the statistical results against the null hypothesis and state whether it is accepted or rejected.
              Step 4: Write Section 4 of the DAA: Statistical Conclusions
              • Provide a brief summary of your analysis and the conclusions drawn about this t-test.
              • Analyze the limitations of the statistical test and/or possible alternative explanations for your results.
              Step 5: Write Section 5 of the DAA: Application

              Analyze how you might use the independent samples t-test in your field of study.

              • Name an independent variable and dependent variable that would work for such an analysis and why studying it may be important to the field or practice.

              Submit your DAA template as an attached Word document in the assignment area.

              SCORING GUIDE

              Your Work will be evaluated using this criteria.

              VIEW SCORING GUIDE

              Competencies Measured

              By successfully completing this assignment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the following course competencies and assignment criteria:

              • Competency 1: Analyze the computation, application, strengths, and limitations of various statistical tests.
                • Analyze statistical assumptions.
              • Competency 2: Analyze the decision-making process of data analysis.
                • Articulate the data analysis plan.
              • Competency 3: Apply knowledge of hypothesis testing.
                • Interpret statistical results and hypotheses.
              • Competency 4: Interpret the results of statistical analyses.
                • Explain statistical conclusions, the limitations of the test, and possible alternative explanations.
              • Competency 6: Apply the results of statistical analyses (your own or others) to your field of interest or career.
                • Analyze the potential applications of the test in the field and their implications.
              • Competency 7: Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with the expectations for members in the identified field of study.
                • Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and adheres to APA style and formatting.

              SUBMIT YOUR ASSIGNMENT

            • Write Your Discussion Post

              This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate discussions. If you have not yet read the Prepare: Introducing Yellowdig study in the first unit, read that now to learn what Yellowdig is and how to use it. The following resources will be provided in every Yellowdig discussion in this course for on-the-spot help using Yellowdig and understanding how grading in Yellowdig works.

              Discussion Question

              tests are often used to determine the efficacy of a particular treatment. In ideal randomized clinical trials, subjects and providers don’t know who is getting the treatment and who is getting the placebo. This way, the data won’t be compromised. It is, in fact, quite important that everyone believe they are getting the treatment.

              Please post something to the discussion board related to the content covered this week. Do not create your post as a reply to the pinned post. Instead, use Yellowdig’s Create option to create a new post. Label your post with the hashtag for the week (#Week6) so that others can sort posts by the week’s topic.

              Here are some ideas for your post to get you started:

              • What are your thoughts about the ethics of randomized clinical trials? Give your post a hashtag in the body (e.g., #clinicalethics). If you find something you want to share, post an image or a link to a URL with pertinent resources. Let us know how this week’s work has affected your thinking either personally or professionally.
              • Which outside resource (image, video, article) touches on this subject? Share the link within your post. What real-life benefits or negatives do you see in that example to this research approach?
              • What about this week’s content is relevant to your own professional or academic career?

              Response Guidelines

              As you respond to your classmates, share your experiences and anecdotal feedback regarding their posts. How have your personal experiences resonated with their ideas? What can you add to their ideas, building on the connections you have made to the material so far? Consider exploring the features of Yellowdig, such as your ability to embed videos and pictures, create polls and videos, use hashtags, love or like a post, and so on.

              Week 7

               

              • One-Way ANOVA Introduction

                 

                Exploring ANOVA

                You’re starting to learn some important information about your data, but you still want to know more. It’s time for a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Unlike tests that only allow for comparisons of two groups, ANOVA will allow you to examine potential group differences for variables with multiple levels. For example, you might want to see whether performance differed in the same course taught by three different instructors. The independent variable in that case would be “instructor” (who taught the class); “grades” would be the dependent variable. This technique may allow you to identify some important group differences.

                TO DO LIST:

                • Discussion: Choose one option to respond to this week.
                • Quiz: Check your knowledge of ANOVA.
                • What You Need To Know: Understand the basics of ANOVA.
                • Plan: Get a head start on your data analysis for next week’s assignment.
              • Discussion Overview

                 

                Each discussion in this course has three to four options that may apply readings, use new skills, ask you to identify additional outside sources, reflect on how content applies to you, or give you an opportunity to talk about what interests you most. You will choose one option to respond to each week.

              • Assignment Overview

                 

                There is no assignment this week, so focus on your readings, review the 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF], and take the quiz.

              • What You Need to Know

                 

                Readings

                The following are some readings on the basics of ANOVA.

                • Field, A. (2018). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS: North American edition (5th ed.). Sage.
                  • Chapter 12 describes the basics of ANOVA.
                • The 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] highlights content to focus on as you read and absorb the materials. You may also find some additional articles with direct relevance to your field here.

                ANOVA

                This week, you will study the theory and logic of ANOVA. Recall that a t test requires a predictor variable that is dichotomous (it has only two levels or groups). The advantage of ANOVA over a t test is that the categorical predictor variable can have two or more groups. Just like a t test, the outcome variable in ANOVA is continuous and requires the calculation of group means.

              • Plan: Week 8 Assignment Preparation

                 

                This week’s work provides context for an upcoming assignment on ANOVA in Week 8, in which you’ll get a chance to use SPSS again. Doing anything for the first time takes a little longer. If you are new to SPSS or ANOVA, it’s a good idea to get a head start. Completing the assignment may take more time than you think. Consider starting your data analysis. Please let your instructor know if you have any problems or questions about SPSS.

                The following resources may be helpful:

              • Write Your Discussion Post

                This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate discussions. If you have not yet read the Prepare: Introducing Yellowdig study in the first unit, read that now to learn what Yellowdig is and how to use it. The following resources will be provided in every Yellowdig discussion in this course for on-the-spot help using Yellowdig and understanding how grading in Yellowdig works.

                Discussion Question

                This week is all about analysis of variance.

                Please post something to the discussion board related to the content covered this week. Do not create your post as a reply to the pinned post. Instead, use Yellowdig’s Create option to create a new post. Label your post with the hashtag for the week (#Week7) so that others can sort posts by the week’s topic.

                Here are some ideas for your post to get you started:

                • Let’s say you were working on a project examining the effects of studying on test grades. You have three groups that you are comparing—one with learners who didn’t study at all, one with learners who studied two hours or less, and one that studied more than two hours. You run an ANOVA that shows that learners who didn’t study at all had the highest scores on the test. This leaves you somewhat puzzled. How might you explain this result? What factors might you need to control for to make sure you got it right? Share your thoughts and information in Yellowdig. Give your post a hashtag in the body (e.g., #screwystats).
                • Which outside resource (image, video, article) is a good example of when a researcher did not control for essential variables? Share the link within your post. What struck you the most about this example?
                • What about this week’s content is relevant to your own professional or academic career?

                Response Guidelines

                As you respond to your classmates, share your experiences and anecdotal feedback regarding their posts. How have your personal experiences resonated with their ideas? What can you add to their ideas, building on the connections you have made to the material so far? Consider exploring the features of Yellowdig, such as your ability to embed videos and pictures, create polls and videos, use hashtags, love or like a post, and so on.

                GO TO YELLOWDIG DISCUSSION BOARD

              • Take the Quiz

                After completing this week’s readings, take the quiz to test your understanding of ANOVA.

                Please carefully read the following instructions before beginning the quiz:

                • You must complete and submit the quiz by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. Central Time.
                • You may take the quiz three times. Do not open and close the quiz to return to it later as this will end the quiz session.
                • This quiz is not timed, but once you submit the quiz, you may not go back and change any of your responses.
                • Your score is automatically recorded in the instructor’s grade book upon completion of the quiz.
                • Your score and the correct answers will be accessible to you after you have completed the quiz and your score is recorded.
                • This quiz is worth 3 percent of your overall grade for the course. There are 5 questions worth 20 points each for a total of 100 possible points.

                To begin, click the linked quiz title to access the quiz. If you have any issues with the quiz, contact your instructor.

                Week 8

                 

                • ANOVA Application

                   

                  What’s the Difference?

                  Imagine that you heard complaints that a particular instructor is difficult to understand, while others teaching the same course are much more straightforward with their content and expectations. You wonder whether these differences in teaching have an effect on learner outcomes. This week, you’ll explore whether actual group differences in grades exist, based on who’s teaching the course.

                  TO DO LIST:

                  • Discussion: Choose one option to respond to this week.
                  • Assignment: Run and interpret a one-way ANOVA in SPSS.
                  • What You Need To Know: Understand how to run and interpret a one-way ANOVA.
                • Discussion Overview

                   

                  Each discussion in this course has three to four options that may apply readings, use new skills, ask you to identify additional outside sources, reflect on how content applies to you, or give you an opportunity to talk about what interests you most. You will choose one option to respond to each week.

                • Assignment Overview

                   

                  In this week’s assignment, you’ll get a chance to run and interpret an ANOVA. Your readings and the 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] will help you in your efforts.

                • What You Need to Know

                   

                  Readings

                  Read about how to apply your knowledge of ANOVA and run some analyses in SPSS.

                  • George, D., & Mallery, P. (2019). IBM SPSS statistics 25 step by step: A simple guide and reference (15th ed.). Routledge.
                    • Chapter 12 describes how to run an ANOVA in SPSS.
                  • Field, A. (2018). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS: North American edition (5th ed.). Sage.
                    • Review Chapter 12’s information on post hoc procedures and output from one-way ANOVAs to help you with your assignment.
                  • The 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] highlights content to focus on as you read and absorb the materials. You may also find some additional articles with direct relevance to your field here.

                  One-Way ANOVA and the SPSS Data Set

                  This week, you will apply your understanding of the one-way ANOVA to the SPSS data set.

                • Assignment Instructions

                  ANOVA APPLICATION AND INTERPRETATION

                  Instructions

                  Complete the following for this assignment:

                  The grades.sav file is a sample SPSS data set. The data represent a teacher’s recording of student demographics and performance on quizzes and a final exam across three sections of the course. Each section consists of 35 students (N = 105). There are 21 variables in grades.sav.

                  This week’s assignment is on ANOVA. You will analyze the following variables in the grades.sav data set:

                  SPSS Variable Definition
                  Section Class section
                  Quiz3 Quiz 3: number of correct answers
                  Step 1: Write Section 1 of the DAA: The Data Analysis Plan
                  • Name the variables used in this analysis and whether they are categorical or continuous.
                  • State a research question, null hypothesis, and alternate hypothesis for the analysis of variance (ANOVA).
                  Step 2: Write Section 2 of the DAA: Testing Assumptions

                  Test for one of the assumptions of ANOVA – normality.

                  • Create SPSS output showing the Shapiro-Wilk test of normality. Run the Shapiro-Wilk test on the dependent variable test for the entire sample. Do not split the data up by gender before running the normality test.
                  • Paste the table in the DAA.
                  • Interpret the Shapiro-Wilk test and how you determined whether the assumption of normality was met or violated.
                  Step 3: Write Section 3 of the DAA: Results and Interpretation
                  • Paste the following SPSS tables into the document:
                    • Descriptives table
                    • ANOVA table
                    • Multiple Comparison table
                  • Report the means and standard deviations of quiz3 for each group of the section variable.
                  • Report the results of the F test and interpret the statistical results against the null hypothesis and state whether it is accepted or rejected.
                  • Finally, if the F is significant, interpret the post-hoc tests (multiple comparisons).
                  Step 4: Write Section 4 of the DAA: Statistical Conclusions
                  • Provide a brief summary of your analysis and the conclusions drawn about this ANOVA.
                  • Analyze the limitations of the statistical test and/or possible alternative explanations for your results.
                  Step 5: Write Section 5 of the DAA: Application

                  Analyze how you might use the ANOVA in your field of study.

                  • Name an independent variable (the IV should have three or more groups/categories) and dependent variable that would work for such an analysis and why studying it may be important to the field or practice.

                  Submit your DAA template as an attached Word document in the assignment area.

                  SCORING GUIDE

                  Your Work will be evaluated using this criteria.

                  VIEW SCORING GUIDE

                  Competencies Measured

                  By successfully completing this assignment, you will demonstrate your proficiency in the following course competencies and assignment criteria:

                  • Competency 1: Analyze the computation, application, strengths, and limitations of various statistical tests.
                    • Analyze statistical assumptions.
                  • Competency 2: Analyze the decision-making process of data analysis.
                    • Articulate the data analysis plan.
                  • Competency 3: Apply knowledge of hypothesis testing.
                    • Interpret statistical results and hypotheses.
                  • Competency 4: Interpret the results of statistical analyses.
                    • Explain statistical conclusions, the limitations of the test, and possible alternative explanations.
                  • Competency 6: Apply the results of statistical analyses (your own or others) to your field of interest or career.
                    • Analyze the potential applications of the test in the field and their implications.
                  • Competency 7: Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and consistent with the expectations for members in the identified field of study.
                    • Communicate in a manner that is scholarly, professional, and adheres to APA style and formatting.

                  SUBMIT YOUR ASSIGNMENT

                • Write Your Discussion Post

                  This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate discussions. If you have not yet read the Prepare: Introducing Yellowdig study in the first unit, read that now to learn what Yellowdig is and how to use it. The following resources will be provided in every Yellowdig discussion in this course for on-the-spot help using Yellowdig and understanding how grading in Yellowdig works.

                  Discussion Question

                  This week’s focus is the potential dangers of statistics if misused.

                  Please post something to the discussion board related to the content covered this week. Do not create your post as a reply to the pinned post. Instead, use Yellowdig’s Create option to create a new post. Label your post with the hashtag for the week (#Week8) so that others can sort posts by the week’s topic.

                  Here are some ideas for your post to get you started:

                  • Mark Twain popularized the phrase, “There are three kinds of lies: Lies, damned lies, and statistics.” What do you think this phrase means? Share your thoughts with your classmates in Yellowdig. Give your post a hashtag (e.g., #statslies).
                  • Which outside resource (image, video, article) is a good example of when statistics are interpreted incorrectly—either intentionally or unintentionally? Share the link within your post. How might the average person recognize they are being led astray?
                  • What about this week’s content is relevant to your own professional or academic career?

                  Response Guidelines

                  As you respond to your classmates, share your experiences and anecdotal feedback regarding their posts. How have your personal experiences resonated with their ideas? What can you add to their ideas, building on the connections you have made to the material so far? Consider exploring the features of Yellowdig, such as your ability to embed videos and pictures, create polls and videos, use hashtags, love or like a post, and so on.

                  Week 9

                   

                  • Regression Introduction

                    Prediction

                    Regression is a great tool that enables you to predict learner outcomes. Although correlation allows you to examine the direction and strength of the relationship between two variables, regression uses an equation that allows you to explore how one variable potentially changes or predicts another. This technique lets you really start to answer some key questions about what is driving performance in the classroom.

                    TO DO LIST:

                    • Discussion: Choose one option to respond to this week.
                    • Quiz: Check your knowledge of regression.
                    • What You Need to Know: Understand the basics of regression.
                  • Discussion Overview

                     

                    Each discussion in this course has three to four options that may apply readings, use new skills, ask you to identify additional outside sources, reflect on how content applies to you, or give you an opportunity to talk about what interests you most. You will choose one option to respond to each week.

                  • Assignment Overview

                     

                    There is no assignment this week, so focus on your readings, review the 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF], and take the quiz.

                  • What You Need to Know

                     

                    Readings

                    Read about simple linear regression:

                    • Field, A. (2018). Discovering statistics using IBM SPSS: North American edition (5th ed.). Sage.
                      • Chapter 9 describes the basics of regression analysis.
                    • The 7864 Course Study Guide [PDF] highlights content to focus on as you read and absorb the materials. You may also find some additional articles with direct relevance to your field here.

                    Regression

                    The final test you will study is regression. Regression is similar to correlation, but it goes beyond simply identifying relationships between variables and instead allows you to predict outcomes of interest.

                  • Write Your Discussion Post

                    This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate discussions. If you have not yet read the Prepare: Introducing Yellowdig study in the first unit, read that now to learn what Yellowdig is and how to use it. The following resources will be provided in every Yellowdig discussion in this course for on-the-spot help using Yellowdig and understanding how grading in Yellowdig works.

                    Discussion Question

                    Many phenomena in the world are complex, and explaining why they happen is difficult. Regression is a great tool for analyzing multiple sources of causation.

                    Please post something to the discussion board related to the content covered this week. Do not create your post as a reply to the pinned post. Instead, use Yellowdig’s Create option to create a new post. Label your post with the hashtag for the week (#Week9) so that others can sort posts by the week’s topic.

                    Here are some ideas for your post to get you started:

                    • Think about an outcome that is critical in your field. It may be patient or client health, risk preparedness, company profit, reading achievement, or any number of other outcomes. What factors could you test to see what is driving that outcome? Share your factors with your classmates in Yellowdig. Give your post a hashtag in the body (e.g., #statsprediction).
                    • Which outside resource (image, video, article) helps explain or explore multiple sources of causation for a phenomenon that interests you? Share the link within your post. What caught your eye about this resource?
                    • What about this week’s content is relevant to your own professional or academic career?

                    Response Guidelines

                    As you respond to your classmates, share your experiences and anecdotal feedback regarding their posts. How have your personal experiences resonated with their ideas? What can you add to their ideas, building on the connections you have made to the material so far? Consider exploring the features of Yellowdig, such as your ability to embed videos and pictures, create polls and videos, use hashtags, love or like a post, and so on.

                    GO TO YELLOWDIG DISCUSSION BOARD

                  • Take the Quiz

                    After completing this week’s readings, take the quiz to test your understanding of regression. Please carefully read the following instructions before beginning the quiz:

                    • You must complete and submit the quiz by Sunday at 11:59 p.m. Central Time.
                    • You may take the quiz three times. Do not open and close the quiz to return to it later as this will end the quiz session.
                    • This quiz is not timed, but once you submit the quiz, you may not go back and change any of your responses.
                    • Your score is automatically recorded in the instructor’s grade book upon completion of the quiz.
                    • Your score and the correct answers will be accessible to you after you have completed the quiz and your score is recorded.
                    • This quiz is worth 3 percent of your overall grade for the course. There are 5 questions worth 20 points each for a total of 100 possible points.

                    To begin, click the linked quiz title to access the quiz. If you have any issues with the quiz, contact your instructor.

                    Week 10

                     

                    • Course Wrap Up

                      Almost Across the Finish Line!

                      You have made it! Congratulations on crossing the finishing line this Friday! Think back to how far you have come since Week 1. This week we are wrapping up the course with YellowDig discussions and saying our goodbyes. It’s been a pleasure working with you!

                      TO DO LIST:

                      • Discussion: Choose one option to respond to this week.
                    • Discussion Overview

                       

                      Each discussion in this course has three to four options that may apply readings, use new skills, ask you to identify additional outside sources, reflect on how content applies to you, or give you an opportunity to talk about what interests you most. You will choose one option to respond to each week.

                    • Write Your Discussion Post

                      This course uses a tool called Yellowdig to facilitate discussions. If you have not yet read the Prepare: Introducing Yellowdig study in this unit, read that now to learn what Yellowdig is and how to use it. The following resources will be provided in every Yellowdig discussion in this course for on-the-spot help using Yellowdig and understanding how grading in Yellowdig works.

                      Discussion Question

                      This week, you wrap up with a reflection on the course.

                      Please post something to the discussion board related to the content covered this week. Do not create your post as a reply to the pinned post. Instead, use Yellowdig’s Create option to create a new post. Label your post with the hashtag for the week (#Week10) so that others can sort posts by the week’s topic.

                      Here are some ideas for your post to get you started:

                      • What’s your biggest takeaway from this class? Give your post a hashtag (e.g., #done!).
                      • Which outside resource (image, video, article) touches on the topic or idea you found the most compelling from the course? Share the link within your post. What strikes you now as interesting or important about this resource that you might not have caught 10 weeks ago?

                      Response Guidelines

                      As you respond to your classmates, share your experiences and anecdotal feedback regarding their posts. How have your personal experiences resonated with their ideas? What can you add to their ideas, building on the connections you have made to the material so far? Consider exploring the features of Yellowdig, such as your ability to embed videos and pictures, create polls and videos, use hashtags, love or like a post, and so on.