URINALYSIS

Please complete your answers to the lab questions on this form. Please complete your answers, and SAVE the file in a location which you will be able to find again. Then, attach and submit the completed form to the Week 5 Laboratory dropbox in the Ashford University classroom.
Result Tables
Table 1: Normal and Abnormal Urinalysis Results
Test Normal Results Abnormal Results and Symptoms/Possible Diagnosis
pH 4.5 – 7.5 Below 4.5: Acidic Urine; diabetes, starvation, dehydration, respiratory acidosis, kidney or urinary tract disorder.
Above 7.5: Alkaline urine; kidney disease, kidney failure, urinary tract infection, respiratory alkalosis.
Glucose None Red or Green Color: Glucose present; diabetes mellitus.
Protein None Violet Color: Protein present; kidney disease.
Yeast None Effervescence: Yeast present; yeast infection in urinary tract.
Ketones Little or None High Concentrations of Ketones Present: Starvation, prolonged vomiting, diabetes, hyperthyroidism, or other metabolic disorders.

 

Table 2: Todd’s Results
Test Results Diagnosis:
pH 4.0
Glucose Glucose Present
Protein None
Yeast None
Ketones None

Table 3: Sharon’s Results
Test Results Diagnosis:
pH 3.0
Glucose Glucose Present
Protein None
Yeast None
Ketones Ketones Present
Test Results Diagnosis:
pH 8.0
Glucose None
Protein Yes
Yeast None
Ketones Ketones Present
Table 4: Helen’s Results

Table 5: Simon’s Results
Test Results Diagnosis:
pH 6.5
Glucose None
Protein None
Yeast Yes
Ketones None
Post-Lab Questions
1. How can a patient’s hydration status be measured by urine color?
2. Research ketonuria. What is this disease? How does it occur, and can it be treated?
3. Why doesn’t healthy urine contain any glucose?
4. When are ketones produced? Why might this lead to a diagnosis of starvation or fasting?
5. What does a red or smoky brown urine color indicate?
6. What is the purpose of performing a urine test on a pregnant woman? What are the potential findings and causes for those findings?