Assignment: Capstone Paper, Part II: Quality Improvement Plan, Resources and Conclusion You will write the final section your Capstone Paper. The Assignment you will submit this week will combine the

Our papers are 100% unique and written following academic standards and provided requirements. Get perfect grades by consistently using our writing services. Place your order and get a quality paper today. Rely on us and be on schedule! With our help, you'll never have to worry about deadlines again. Take advantage of our current 20% discount by using the coupon code GET20


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper

Assignment: Capstone Paper, Part II: Quality Improvement Plan, Resources and Conclusion

You will write the final section your Capstone Paper. The Assignment you will submit this week will combine the work you completed in Week 4 (Evidenced-Based Practice Plan) and will integrate the Resources and Conclusion details in approximately 3-5 paragraphs for your Capstone Paper. Be sure to include scholarly references identified in the literature review to support your EBP plan. Use appropriate and persuasive language that communicates meaning with clarity and fluency to readers, and is virtually error-free.

To prepare for this Assignment:

  • Review the Capstone Paper Assignment Guide
  • Locate the most current version of your Week 4 Assignment. You will add these sections to that document.

Introduction. Briefly review your practice problem and include a purpose statement. Include data to support the problem.

  • Evidence-Based Practice Plan Explanation  (Completed in Week 4)

    • Provide a detailed explanation of the evidence-based practice quality improvement plan that you will use to address the practice problem.
    • Support your plan with scholarly references (the sources you found in the analysis of the evidence).
  • Resources (new in Week 5)

    • Describe the resources needed to support the change in practice such as personnel time, supplies for staff education, cost of new equipment, or cost of software.
    • Explain why each resource is necessary.
  • Conclusion

    • Discuss all key points addressed in this assignment.

Assignment: Capstone Paper, Part II: Quality Improvement Plan, Resources and Conclusion You will write the final section your Capstone Paper. The Assignment you will submit this week will combine the
1 Title of the Capstone Student Name Program Name or Degree Name (e.g., Bachelor of Science in Psychology), Walden University COURSE XXX: Title of Course Instructor Name Month XX, 202X Title of the Capstone Do not add any extra spaces between your heading and your text (check Spacing under Format, Paragraph in your word processor, and make sure that it’s set to 0”); just use a standard double space, and indent the first line of each paragraph a full ½ inch (preferably using the tab button). Your introduction should receive no specific heading because it is assumed that your first section is your introduction section. After considering these formatting issues, you will need to construct a thesis statement, which lets readers know the argument you will be supporting and developing in your paper. This statement provides readers with a lens for understanding the evidence you will present in the body of your essay (each paragraph and thus evidence within those paragraphs you include should support and apply to this thesis statement). Once you have established your thesis, begin constructing the introduction. Introductions are usually organized from broad to narrow, with the broadest, general information around your topic going first, then narrowing to provide more specific details until you end with your thesis statement. An easy template for writing an introduction follows: 1. Start with what’s been said/done regarding your topic of interest. 2. Explain the problem with what’s been said or done. 3. Offer your solution, your thesis statement (one that can be supported by the evidence). Level 1 Heading This text will be the beginning of the body of the essay. Even though this section has a new heading, make sure to connect this section to the previous one so readers follow your ideas and evidence. The first sentence in each paragraph should start with a topic sentence, which summarizes the main point in the current paragraph. Make sure each paragraph contains only one topic, which helps establish a clear scope for your paragraph. When you see yourself drifting to another idea, make sure you break into a new paragraph. You can use the MEAL plan as a way to conceptualize and organize your paragraphs. In short, think about our paragraphs in this way: new idea, new paragraph. Level 2 Heading The Level 2 heading designates a subsection of the previous section. Using headings is a great way to organize a paper and increase its readability, so see section 2.27 of APA 7 and the Writing Center’s Heading Levels webpage for details on heading formatting (APA 7 also has a chart detailing heading formatting in the inside front cover). For shorter papers, using one or two levels is all that is needed. You would use Level 1 (centered, bold font with title case) and Level 2 (left aligned, bold, title case). Level 3 Heading The number of headings you need in a particular paper is not set, but for longer papers, you may need another heading level. You would then use Level 3 (left-aligned, bold, italicized, title case). One crucial area in APA is learning how to cite. Make sure to cite source information throughout your paper to avoid plagiarism. This practice is critical: you need to give credit to your sources and avoid copying others’ work. Look at Chapter 8 of APA 7 and the Writing Center’s Plagiarism Prevention Resource Kit for guidelines on citing source information in your writing. Level 1 Heading The conclusion section should recap the major points of your paper. A conclusion can be one paragraph, but it can also be a few paragraphs, depending on the length of your paper. However, perhaps more importantly, the conclusion should also interpret what you have written and what it means in the bigger picture. To help write your conclusion, consider asking yourself these questions: What do you want to happen with the information you have provided? What do you want to change? What is your ultimate goal in using this information? What would it mean if the reader of your paper took and used the suggestions in your paper? References (Note that the following references are intended as examples only. These entries illustrate different types of references but are not cited in the body of this template. In your paper, be sure every reference entry matches a citation, and every citation refers to an item in the reference list. For additional information, examples, and help with reference entries, see Chapter 9 of APA 7 and the Writing Center’s References section of the website, particularly the Common Reference List Examples page.) American Counseling Association. (n.d.). About us. https://www.counseling.org/about-us/about-aca Anderson, M. (2018). Getting consistent with consequences. Educational Leadership, 76(1), 26-33. Bach, D., & Blake, D. J. (2016). Frame or get framed: The critical role of issue framing in nonmarket management. California Management Review, 58(3), 66-87. https://doi.org/10.1525/cmr.2016.58.3.66 Burgess, R. (2019). Rethinking global health: Frameworks of Power. Routledge.​ Herbst-Damm, K. L., & Kulik, J. A. (2005). Volunteer support, marital status, and the survival times of terminally ill patients. Health Psychology, 24(2), 225–229. https://doi.org/10.1037/0278-6133.24.2.225 Johnson, P. (2003). Art: A new history. HarperCollins. https://doi.org/10.1037.0000136-000​ Lindley, L. C., & Slayter, E. M. (2018). Prior trauma exposure and serious illness at end of life: A national study of children in the U.S. foster care system from 2005 to 2015. Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, 56(3), 309–317. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpainsymman.2018.06.001 Osman, M. A. (2016, December 15). 5 do’s and don’ts for staying motivated. Mayo Clinic. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/adult-health/in-depth/5-dos-and-donts-for-staying-motivated/art-20270835 Sue, D. W., & Sue, D. (2016). Counseling the culturally diverse: Theory and practice (7th ed.). Wiley. Walden University Library. (n.d.). Anatomy of a research article [Video]. https://academicguides.waldenu.edu/library/instructionalmedia/tutorials#s-lg-box-7955524 Walden University Writing Center. (n.d.). Writing literature reviews in your graduate coursework [Webinar]. https://academicguides.waldenu.edu/writingcenter/webinars/graduate#s-lg-box-18447417 World Health Organization. (2018, March). Questions and answers on immunization and vaccine safety. https://www.who.int/features/qa/84/en/
Assignment: Capstone Paper, Part II: Quality Improvement Plan, Resources and Conclusion You will write the final section your Capstone Paper. The Assignment you will submit this week will combine the
1 Use of Restraints and Seclusion in Children and Adolescents Shannon R. Pierce Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Walden University NURS 4220: Leadership Competencies in Nursing and Healthcare April Martin October 31, 2021 Use of Restraints and Seclusion in Children and Adolescents A physical constraint can be defined as using force to prevent and restrict the natural movement of any part of a patient’s body. On the other hand, seclusion is socially isolating patients from other people. Restrictive strategies such as excessive restraints and seclusion have been used in the mental healthcare industry for a long time as a reactive intervention to aggressive behaviors among patients, especially children and adolescents (Chieze et al., 2019). Many experts agree that physical restraints often cause significant bodily injury to the patients, but the psychological effects of the practice are often ignored. Despite the knowledge that physical restraint often causes physical injuries among mental health patients, the technique is widely practiced in many mental healthcare facilities, and this requires to be stopped for better health for all. Research into the use of physical restraint and seclusion Researchers have established that physically restraining patients negatively affects their mental health (Department of Health, 2017). Restrained patients are likely to develop other mental complications such as mood disorders. However, some violent and aggressive behaviors such as kicking others, spitting on people, damaging property, hurting oneself, or other people may necessitate the use of physical restraint and seclusion among mental health care patients. Nevertheless, the physicians enforcing these techniques should understand their impact on the patient’s psychological and physical well-being. Researchers have also established that executing these techniques has a negative psychological effect on the staff. (Tölli et al., 2017). The healthcare facility’s staff may experience ugly emotions such as unnecessary anger, fear, and anxiety due to the consistent implementation of these practices (Mérineau-Côté & Morin, 2013). This contributes to increased staff turnover in the facility, which is very costly (Department of Health, 2017). Impact of physical restraint and seclusion The practice of physical restraint and seclusion causes a deep mistrust between mental health care patients and their caregivers, significantly hindering the success of the treatment plans. Mental healthcare practitioners argue that the practice is essential in ensuring the safety of all stakeholders in the facility. The procedure is deemed necessary to prevent the children and adolescents from hurting themselves or the people around them (Tölli et al., 2018). However, with the dawn of the Age of information, more people are informed about their rights and liberties as patients. Thus, mental healthcare practitioners who use this practice face severe legal, ethical, and moral challenges.  The physicians must carefully assess their reaction to their patients’ violent behaviors. They should consider the rights and freedoms of all patients. This includes the rights to self-determination, dignity, security, and physical integrity. Addressing the Issue of Physical restraint and Seclusion through CPI (Crisis Preventive Intervention The Department of Health has issued advice on using positive and proactive techniques to foster a culture where physical interventions are only required as a last option. Several reports have focused on the misuse or abuse of restrictive interventions in health and care services. Restraint reduction aims for schools, hospitals, and human care agencies devoted to properly controlling agitated behavior. In healthcare, the Joint Commission has its Elements of Performance addressing the use of the physical constraint (Gowda et al., 2018). CPI’s training and tools can assist you with constraint reduction in education, healthcare, or human services. Nonviolent Crisis Intervention training from CPI teaches hospital personnel de-escalation methods and various alternatives to restraint. The training programs follow The Joint Commission and CMS requirements (Mérineau-Côté & Morin, 2013). Select personnel can be qualified to teach the curriculum to other professionals on an ongoing basis using the train-the-trainer option. According to the MHA Code of Practice 11, health and care providers must ensure that their staff is adequately educated in the confinement of mentally ill patients. Implementing restrictive measures in community-based health and social care services and non-mental hospital settings is very seldom authorized under the Mental Health Act of 1983 (MHA) 18 ((South et al., 2010). The use of force is only justified in self-defense, defense of others, criminal prevention, property protection, or property protection. Addressing the Issue of Physical restraint and Seclusion through Reviews of Restrictive Intervention and Effective Administration Annual reviews of restrictive intervention reduction programs must be conducted, and they must be made available for inspection by the CQC and Monitor. Any service user who has a behavior support plan that recommends restrictive interventions should have clear, proactive strategies in place. The principles of the Programme for British Standards must be followed when providing care (PBS). The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has created a robust registration, regulation, and inspection system that holds businesses and NHS boards accountable for care failures (Mask & Adepoju, 2019). According to the CQC, physical interventions are risky and put both staff and service users at risk of bodily or mental damage. Restriction intervention reduction programs must be implemented in services based on the concepts of effective leadership, data-informed practice, workforce development, and service user empowerment. A yearly assessment of control measures is required to revise and update corporate action plans. Any service user who has a behavior-support plan that recommends restrictive measures should have clearly defined proactive tactics. Leaders should also promote the use of alternatives to seclusion and restraint, develop a clearly articulated plan, take an active leadership role in reducing the use of seclusion and restraint, and hold staff members accountable. Moreover, there should be increased support and advocacy for patients (Raveesh et al., 2019). This implies the promotion of advocacy for inpatients in mental health hospitals. This should involve youths, family members/caregivers of patients, and advocates in various settings to curb the use of excessive restraint and seclusion. As discussed in this paper, excessive physical restraint and seclusion have negative physical and psychological impacts on children and adolescents. Therefore, mental healthcare facilities should adopt better and efficient strategies to manage violent behaviors among patients. This includes personnel to anticipate violent activities and prevent them from happening. Caregivers should adopt non-aggressive communication strategies to prevent and respond to violent and aggressive behaviors. They can also use other treatment plans such as behavioral therapy. References Chieze M., Hurst, S., Kaiser S., & Sentissi O. (2019). Effects of Seclusion and Restraint in Adult Psychiatry: A Systematic Review. Frontiers in psychiatry, 10, 491. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyt.2019.00491 Department of Health. (2017). Reducing the need for restraint and restrictive intervention. GOV.UK. Retrieved 31 October 2021, from https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/reducing-the-need-for-restraint-and-restrictive-intervention. Gowda, G., Lepping, P., Noorthoorn, E., Ali, S., Kumar, C., Raveesh, B., & Math, S. (2018). Restraint prevalence and perceived coercion among psychiatric inpatients from South India: A prospective study. Asian Journal of Psychiatry, 36, 10-16. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajp.2018.05.024 Mask, A., & Adepoju, O. (2019). Relationship between Accountable Care Organization Status and 30-Day Hospital-wide Readmissions: Are All Accountable Care Organizations Created Equal? Journal for Healthcare Quality, 41(1), 10-16. https://doi.org/10.1097/jhq.0000000000000132 Mérineau-Côté, J., & Morin, D. (2013). Restraint and Seclusion: The Perspective of Service Users and Staff Members. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 27(5), 447-457. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12069  Raveesh B., Gowda G., & Gowda M. (2019). Alternatives to use of restraint: A path toward humanistic care. Indian journal of psychiatry, 61(Suppl 4), S693-S697. https://doi.org/10.4103/psychiatry.IndianJPsychiatry_104_19 South, J., Darby, F., Bagnall, A., & White, A. (2010). Implementing a community-based self-care training initiative: a process evaluation. Health & Social Care in the Community, 18(6), 662-670. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2524.2010.00940.x Tölli, S., Partanen, P., Kontio, R., & Häggman-Laitila, A. (2017). A quantitative systematic review of the effects of training interventions on enhancing the competence of nursing staff in managing challenging patient behaviour. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 73(12), 2817-2831. https://doi.org/10.1111/jan.13351
Assignment: Capstone Paper, Part II: Quality Improvement Plan, Resources and Conclusion You will write the final section your Capstone Paper. The Assignment you will submit this week will combine the
Name: NURS_4220_Week5_Assignment_Rubric Grid View List View   Excellent Proficient Basic Needs Improvement Required ContentProvided a detailed explanation of the evidence-based practice quality improvement plan used to address the practice problem. 50 (33.33%) – 60 (40%) Provided a fully developed evidence-based practice performance improvement plan with insightful analysis of concepts and related issues. 40 (26.67%) – 49 (32.67%) Provided a developed evidence-based practice performance improvement plan with reasonable analysis of concepts and related issues. 30 (20%) – 39 (26%) Provided a minimally developed evidence-based practice performance improvement plan with limited analysis of concepts and related issues. 0 (0%) – 29 (19.33%) Provided an under-developed evidence-based practice performance improvement plan with little or no analysis of concepts and related issues. Required ContentDescribed resources that will be needed to support the change in practice and explained why each resource is necessary. 36 (24%) – 40 (26.67%) Provided a fully developed explanation of resources used to support the plan and why each resource is needed with insightful analysis of concepts and related issues. 32 (21.33%) – 35 (23.33%) Provided a developed explanation of resources used to support the plan and why each resource is needed with reasonable analysis of concepts and related issues. 28 (18.67%) – 31 (20.67%) Provided a minimally developed explanation of resources used to support the plan and why each resource is needed with limited analysis of concepts and related issues. 0 (0%) – 27 (18%) Provided an under-developed explanation of resources used to support the plan and why each resource is needed with little or no analysis of concepts and related issues. Required ContentProvided a comprehensive concluding summary with no new additional information included. 15 (10%) – 20 (13.33%) Provided a fully developed summary with insightful analysis of concepts and related issues. 11 (7.33%) – 14 (9.33%) Provided a developed summary with reasonable analysis of concepts and related issues. 6 (4%) – 10 (6.67%) Provided a minimally developed summary with limited analysis of concepts and related issues. 0 (0%) – 5 (3.33%) Provided an under-developed summary with little or no analysis of concepts and related issues. Professional Writing: Clarity, Flow, and Organization 9 (6%) – 10 (6.67%) Content is free from spelling, punctuation, and grammar/syntax errors. Writing demonstrates very well-formed sentence and paragraph structure. Content presented is completely clear, logical, and well-organized. 8 (5.33%) – 8 (5.33%) Content contains minor spelling, punctuation, and/or grammar/syntax errors. Writing demonstrates appropriate sentence and paragraph structure. Content presented is mostly clear, logical, and well-organized. 7 (4.67%) – 7 (4.67%) Content contains moderate spelling, punctuation, and/or grammar/syntax errors. Writing demonstrates adequate sentence and paragraph structure and may require some editing. Content presented is adequately clear, logical, and/or organized, but could benefit from additional editing/revision. 0 (0%) – 6 (4%) Content contains significant spelling, punctuation, and/or grammar/syntax errors. Writing does not demonstrate adequate sentence and paragraph structure and requires additional editing/proofreading. Key sections of presented content lack clarity, logical flow, and/or organization. Professional Writing: Context, Audience, Purpose, and Tone 9 (6%) – 10 (6.67%) Content clearly demonstrates awareness of context, audience, and purpose. Tone is highly professional, scholarly, and free from bias, and style is appropriate for the professional setting/workplace context. 8 (5.33%) – 8 (5.33%) Content demonstrates satisfactory awareness of context, audience, and purpose. Tone is adequately professional, scholarly, and/or free from bias, and style is consistent with the professional setting/workplace context. 7 (4.67%) – 7 (4.67%) Content demonstrates basic awareness of context, audience, and purpose. Tone is somewhat professional, scholarly, and/or free from bias, and style is mostly consistent with the professional setting/workplace context. 0 (0%) – 6 (4%) Content minimally or does not demonstrate awareness of context, audience, and/or purpose. Writing is not reflective of professional/scholarly tone and/or is not free of bias. Style is inconsistent with the professional setting/workplace context and reflects the need for additional editing. Professional Writing: Originality, Source Credibility, and Attribution of Ideas 9 (6%) – 10 (6.67%) Content reflects original thought and writing and proper paraphrasing. Writing demonstrates full adherence to reference requirements, including the use of credible evidence to support a claim, with appropriate source attribution (when applicable) and references. 8 (5.33%) – 8 (5.33%) Content adequately reflects original writing and paraphrasing. Writing demonstrates adequate adherence to reference requirements, including the use of credible evidence to support a claim, with appropriate source attribution (when applicable) and references. 7 (4.67%) – 7 (4.67%) Content somewhat reflects original writing and paraphrasing. Writing somewhat demonstrates adherence to reference requirements, including the use of credible evidence to support a claim, with appropriate source attribution (when applicable) and references. 0 (0%) – 6 (4%) Content does not adequately reflect original writing and/or paraphrasing. Writing demonstrates inconsistent adherence to reference requirements, including the use of credible evidence to support a claim, with appropriate source attribution (when applicable) and reference. Total Points: 150 Name: NURS_4220_Week5_Assignment_Rubric
Assignment: Capstone Paper, Part II: Quality Improvement Plan, Resources and Conclusion You will write the final section your Capstone Paper. The Assignment you will submit this week will combine the
MY WEEK 4 ASSIGNMENT E: Group B Practice Experience Discussion – Week 4 COLLAPSE Top of Form Excessive or Unnecessary Use of Restraints and Seclusion of Mentally Ill Children In mental health inpatient facilities, mentally ill children die, get injured and psychologically traumatized by unnecessary seclusion and restraint practices (De Hert et al., 2011). In my practice setting, Aida Bugg, a nurse practitioner says that the use of noncoercive de-escalation where the patient is calmed down when agitated helps gain their cooperation and hence makes it easier to evaluate and treat the patient. Proposed Action Steps To improve mental health care for children, action steps can be taken to improve mental health care for children through: Influencing cultural change in mental health issues regarding restraint and seclusion by researching children’s personal experiences of seclusion and restraint, understanding the impact trauma has on children and then sustaining change by involving the patients and the staff (Matte & Collin, 2020). Assessing the risk of violence among secluded children, any medical risk factors and past traumas can be used to develop better safety plans. Trauma informed care of children with mental health issues shifts tradition from what is wrong with the child to what has happened to the patient. This way, health practitioners can understand that mental health issues are related to traumatic experiences and hence it doesn’t help to inflict more trauma on patients. This action step would be effective with the use of accurate data about how serious the issue is, how effective interventions for the issue will be and alternatives when these interventions don’t work (Raveesh et al., 2019). Conducting a movement against restraint and seclusion and the effect it has on children who are mentally ill by involving family members and other relevant advocates for inpatient care. This movement can be used to debrief those concerned about policy, procedures and practices that can be used to minimize the future use of restraints and seclusion (Roy et al., 2020). The movement can also be an avenue to address any adverse or traumatic events of restraint and seclusion. Partnerships and collaborations with both private and public sectors can be used to further influence cultural change, prevent and reduce the use of restraints and seclusion. Partners and stakeholders can be consulted to take an active role in developing new alternatives and taking role in the change process while ensuring accountability. Potential Challenges Implementation of the project can be compromised by lack of proper communication among stakeholders involved. Inadequate finances and resources can deter the project from running effectively and efficiently especially when mobilising new partners or conducting movement (Roy et al., 2020). Also lack of proper stakeholder engagement and cooperation when stakeholders are disinterested or do not give open feedback. Resources The resources that would be needed to implement the project include health care practitioners such as nurses, managers, researchers, material resources and computer software for proper communication with stakeholders and partners (Raveesh et al., 2019). The resources will be cost effective because taking steps to find alternatives or prevent seclusion and restraints will improve the mental health of these children and encourage health seeking behaviour which in turn reduces admissions.             References De Hert, M., Dirix, N., Demunter, H., & Correll, C. U. (2011). Prevalence and correlates of seclusion and restraint use in children and adolescents: a systematic review. European child & adolescent psychiatry, 20(5), 221-230. Matte-Landry, A., & Collin-Vézina, D. (2020). Restraint, seclusion and time-out among children and youth in group homes and residential treatment centers: a latent profile analysis. Child Abuse & Neglect, 109, 104702. Raveesh, B. N., Gowda, G. S., & Gowda, M. (2019). Alternatives to use of restraint: A path toward humanistic care. Indian journal of psychiatry, 61(Suppl 4), S693. Raveesh, B. N., Gowda, G. S., & Gowda, M. (2019). Alternatives to use of restraint: A path toward humanistic care. Indian journal of psychiatry, 61(Suppl 4), S693. MY WEEK 5 ASSIGNMENT  Group B Practice Experience Discussion – Week 5 COLLAPSE Top of Form Practice Experience: Applying Key Interventions to a Practice Problem Restraint and seclusion are utilized to prevent injury and alleviate agitation, as it is hard to administer a program for mentally challenged individuals without utilizing some restrictive intervention (Nielson et al., 2021). Children are subjected to restraint because they are reported to be excessively violent. Retraining is being conducted to decrease the occurrence of risky behavior such as irritation, threat, and assaulting personnel. However, secluding and retraining mentally disabled children has medical and psychological consequences, including developmental issues, psychotic and externalizing diseases, mood and depression, and anxiety (Nielson et al., 2021). Additionally, S/R is contentious since it impinges on patient autonomy and liberty. Huckshorn Six Strategies According to Hammervold et al. (2019), the Huckshorn six strategies is a successful planning tool that leads the creation of seclusion and retraining (S/R) reduction plans by combining a prevention strategy.  Huckshorn six strategies in the care setting include work development, thorough debriefing, leadership in organizational changes, data-driven practice, use of seclusion and restraining techniques, and full engagement of patients and families are among the strategies. According to Hammervold et al. (2019), these measures can significantly reduce isolation and restrain mental healthcare. The first phase is to establish leadership in response to organizational challenges. Senior leadership is involved in the techniques chosen to reduce seclusion and to restrain (S/R) use. The leadership measures include creating a vision, values, and philosophy for S/R, as well as preparing a performance improvement strategy. The vision is critical because it outlines the desired future state and what is expected to be accomplished in the future. In contrast, the improvement action plan directs employees on accomplishing S/R reduction (Perers et al., 2021). The second step entails data collection to inform practice. The purpose of the data collection is to establish a facility’s S/R baseline and collect data on the usage unit, shift, individual staff members participating, consumer demographics, and injuries linked with S/R. The third phase is to establish a workforce. Policies, procedures should guide the treatment environment and practices founded on recovery knowledge and principles and the characteristics of trauma-informed care. The initiatives are carried out with the assistance of extensive and continuing staff training and education. The training will emphasize S/R application training and vendor selection, and the provision of sufficient therapy activities that provide patients with options (Perers et al., 2021). Providers will be educated on sickness and emotional self-management of symptoms and personal triggers that contribute to patient loss of control. The training will further emphasize on educating providers on how to construct customized person-centered treatment plans tailored to each individual’s needs. The team will get instruction on the impact of traumatic experiences on developmental learning, emotional development, recovery, resiliency, and overall health. This will ensure that staff members understand what to do and act professionally to avoid inflicting traumatic experiences on the patient (Perers et al., 2021). Thirdly, isolation and restraining preventative measures are used. The facility’s policies and procedures and each client’s recovery plan incorporate various tools and assessments. The evaluation tools are used to ascertain a child’s risk of violence and his or her history of S/R. Additionally, the universal trauma assessment instruments are used to identify children who are in danger of death or serious harm. Another intervention that is integrated into the individual consumer recovery plan is a de-escalation survey or assessment tool for safety planning to determine individual triggers. The instruments are effective in determining which interventions are most beneficial for emotional self-management. Environmental modifications such as comfort and sensory rooms, sensory modulation interventions, and other therapeutic activities included to teach children self-management skills (Perers et al., 2021). The aggressiveness control behavior scale supports staff in classifying patients who exhibit agitated, disruptive, dangerous, or fatal conduct, thereby avoiding unnecessary restraining and confinement. The fifth phase comprises of performing consumer tasks in a hospital setting. This technique is critical in the S/R treatment plans since it entails the consumer, children, relatives, and external advocates all playing roles in assisting with seclusion and restraint reductions. Consumer assistance includes oversight and monitoring to ensure that seclusion and restraining are conducted in accordance with fundamental human rights, that ensures patient integrity and dignity are preserved, and that patients are treated with care and respect (Perers et al., 2021). Providers conduct debriefing sessions to determine what they could have done differently and make short-term goals to avoid repeated restraint use. The debriefing will aid in elucidating both parties’ behavior concerning prior restraining use. Peer support is also required to guarantee that the patient obtains the critical support necessary for their rehabilitation plan. The final step of seclusion and restraining(S/R) reduction involves employing a debriefing strategy. Debriefing is critical for lowering S/R use since it aids in collecting necessary knowledge that informs policy, procedures, and practice. The treatment team conducts a debriefing in two sections. The first is an immediate post-event acute analysis, and the second is formal problem analysis. Multiple hold debriefings are conducted with children, and staff members involved in treatment events are recognized for instruction on adjusting the treatment plan. Debriefing encompasses all consumer stakeholders, including family, peer support, advocates, and providers.       References Hammervold, U. E., Norvoll, R., Aas, R. W., & Sagvaag, H. (2019). Post-incident review after restraint in mental health care-a a potential for knowledge development, recovery promotion, and restraint prevention. A scoping review. BMC health services research, 19(1), 1-13. Perers, C., Bäckström, B., Johansson, B. A., & Rask, O. (2021). Methods and strategies for reducing seclusion and restraint in child and adolescent psychiatric inpatient care. Psychiatric quarterly, 1-30. Nielson, S., Bray, L., Carter, B., & Kiernan, J. (2021). Physical restraint of children and adolescents in mental health inpatient services: A systematic review and narrative synthesis. Journal of Child Health Care, 25(3), 342–367. https://doi.org/10.1177/1367493520937152 Bottom of Form Bottom of Form

Writerbay.net

We offer the best essay writing services to students who value great quality at a fair price. Let us exceed your expectations if you need help with this or a different assignment. Get your paper completed by a writing expert today. Nice to meet you! Want 15% OFF your first order? Use Promo Code: FIRST15. Place your order in a few easy steps. It will take you less than 5 minutes. Click one of the buttons below.


Order a Similar Paper Order a Different Paper